logos

1 in 4 Workers Does Not Get Enough Sleep Each Night

March 13th, 2017 Comments off
Sleeping and productivity

Employers, beware: The switch to Daylight Saving Time may result in more yawning in the office and a potential dip in productivity. According to a new survey from CareerBuilder, 1 in 4 workers (26 percent) feel he or she does not get enough sleep each night. Ironically, nearly half of all workers (47 percent) say thinking about work keeps them up at night.

Further, only 17 percent of all workers get at least eight hours of sleep a night — which can have a negative impact on productivity, among other factors.

Sleep-deprivation doesn’t just hurt workers – it hurts the bottom line, too. For instance, 3 in 5 workers (60 percent) say lack of sleep has had an impact on their work in some way.

What Does This Mean For You?

Over the past few years, successful organizations have finally started to view sleep deprivation for what it is: a productivity killer and employee health issue. As a result, they’re actively pursuing ways to gently encourage their workers in the right direction.

Here are ways you can improve employees’ sleep quality:

  • Create a company program: Invite sleep experts to visit the office to counsel employees about their habits. Offer stipends for sleep treatments, as part of your wellness program. Stress-reducing treatments, such as fitness memberships and massages, can also help employees become more relaxed at work.
  • Control use of mobile devices at home: Using mobile devices can have detrimental effects on sleep quality. Instead of letting employees bring their company-owned mobile devices home, consider limiting its use to the office only.
  • Create brighter workspaces: Natural lighting helps employees sleep better at night, therefore making them more productive during the day.

 

Get CareerBuilder’s expert recruiting tips and trends, right to your inbox.

5 Reasons You Should Consider HR Automation

February 23rd, 2017 Comments off
HR automation

When is the last time that you’ve had to manually calculate your organization’s payroll? Or had to manage employee time cards? It’s probably been a while, thanks to HR automation tools. These products have empowered HR professionals to spend less time on the tactical details of their jobs and to concentrate on more strategic elements. A new survey from CareerBuilder shows that 72 percent of employers expect that some roles within talent acquisition and human capital management will become completely automated within the next 10 years. 

Now that we have the basics down, it’s time to crank the effectiveness of HR automation to the next level. But the rate at which companies with 250-plus employees are adopting automation varies considerably. Although more are turning to technology to address time-consuming, labor-intensive talent acquisition and management tasks – that are susceptible to human error – the study shows a significant proportion continue to rely on manual processes. One-third of employers (34 percent) don’t use technology automation for recruiting candidates, 44 percent don’t automate onboarding and 60 percent don’t automate human capital management activities for employees.

Why Now Is The Time to Adopt HR Automation

Employers who have automated a part of their talent acquisition and management processes have seen a lot of improvements as a result. Some of the most common include:

  • Saved time and increased efficiency (93 percent): An HR manager who wastes time looking through time-log spreadsheets, files or emails might end up doing nothing else but that. The more the time consumed, the lesser the productivity. Automating the process increases the productivity rate of the HR team and also makes the work hassle-free.
  • Improved the candidate experience (71 percent): Communicating clearly and consistently with applicants throughout the recruiting lifecycle reduces candidate frustration. Applicant tracking software makes it easy to communicate electronically, and candidates also feel empowered because they can log in and check their own application status. Further, if applicants call HR with questions, all the relevant information is available in one place for the HR team.
  • Reduced errors (69 percent): Automating your strategy enables you to standardize records management. At the same time, it removes the potential for human error that plagues so many HR offices. A paper-based system can be a big risk – there might not be back up and, if misplaced or lost in a fire or burglary, for example, some information may not be recoverable.
  • Saved money and resources (67 percent): Automation saves time, and therefore money, leaving your business free to spend that cash on things that really matter.
  • Improved the employee experience (60 percent): Every employee has different requirements. Some travel and have to apply for travel requests and submit expense reports. Others may contact the HR constantly to update their personal and professional information. As an organization grows there will be more and more employees that require HR assistance. Automated HR systems let employees manage all these activities themselves. This way the employee is empowered and the HR burden is reduced tremendously.

 

To help companies find, hire and manage the talent they need, CareerBuilder has extended its product offering beyond recruitment and background screening. Moving into post-hire solutions, CareerBuilder offers everything from benefits administration and onboarding to performance management compliance and wellness.

For more information, visit hiring.careerbuilder.com.

This Year’s Most Bizarre Excuses for Being Late to Work

January 26th, 2017 Comments off
Retro alarm clock on wooden table

We’ve all been there. That time your alarm mysteriously didn’t go off, you couldn’t find your keys and the train was late. But, there’s another breed of latecomers out there — those who don’t seem the least bit bothered by clocking in late for work.

According to a new CareerBuilder survey, when asked how often they come in late to work, more than 1 in 4 workers (29 percent) admitted they do it at least once a month — up from 25 percent last year — and 16 percent say it’s a weekly occurrence for them — up 3 percentage points since last year.

Most of the time when people are late, the excuses are pretty common. But other times, the story gets stranger — which can make it harder to believe. When asked about the most outrageous excuses employees have given them for being late, employers shared the following:

  • I forgot it wasn’t the weekend.
  • I put petroleum jelly in my eyes.
  • I had to watch a soccer game that was being played in Europe.
  • I thought Flag Day was a legal holiday.
  • My pet turtle needed to visit the exotic animal clinic.
  • The wind blew the deck off my house.
  • I overslept because my kids changed all the clocks in the house.
  • I was cornered by a moose.
  • My mother locked me in the closet.
  • The pizza I ordered was late being delivered, and I had to be home to accept/pay for it.
  • The sunrise was so beautiful that I had to stop and take it in.
  • My mother-in-law wouldn’t stop talking.
  • My dad offered to make me a grilled cheese sandwich, and I couldn’t say no.

 

What Are the Rules?

Some jobs require adherence to a specific schedule in order to maintain quality service levels and precise hours of operation. Other jobs can be successfully performed with very flexible hours. Nearly 2 in 3 employers (64 percent) and employees (64 percent) believe the concept of “working 9 to 5” is an antiquated practice, but more than half of employers (53 percent) expect employees to be on time every day, and 4 in 10 (41 percent) have fired someone for being late.

 

What Can You Do About It?

While coming in late once in a while may be unavoidable, chronic tardiness must be dealt with professionally and firmly. Here are three steps to make sure the issue is confronted before it gets out of hand:

  1. Call your employee into a one-on-one meeting.
  2. Discuss any factors causing your employee’s tardiness.
  3. Write up a list of escalating consequences for tardiness

 

Never miss a thing: Get CareerBuilder’s expert recruitment tips in your inbox.

This Year’s 12 Most Outrageous Job Interview Mistakes

January 12th, 2017 Comments off
interview mistakes

What is the most unusual thing a candidate has done in a job interview this year? Invite you to dinner? Bring toys to the interview? CareerBuilder released its annual survey of the most outrageous interview mistakes candidates have made, according to more than 2,600 hiring managers and HR professionals nationwide.

This year’s list includes:

  • Candidate asked to step away to call his wife to ask her if the starting salary was enough before he agreed to continue with the interview.
  • Candidate asked where the nearest bar was located.
  • Candidate brought his childhood toys to the interview.
  • Candidate ate a pizza he brought with him (and didn’t offer to share).
  • Candidate asked interviewer why her aura didn’t like the candidate.
  • Candidate invited interviewer to dinner afterwards.
  • Candidate stated that if the interviewer wanted to get to heaven, she would hire him.
  • Candidate ate crumbs off the table.
  • Candidate said her hair was perfect when asked why she should become part of the team.
  • Candidate sang to a song on the radio playing overhead.
  • Candidate bragged about the fact that they were in the local newspaper for allegedly stealing a treadmill from an older woman’s house.
  • Candidate put on and took off her sunglasses repeatedly.

 

In addition to the most unusual blunders, employers were also asked about the most common and detrimental mistakes candidates have made during an interview. Here are five instant deal breakers, according to employers:

  1. Candidate is caught lying about something: 66 percent
  2. Candidate answers a cellphone or text during the interview: 64 percent
  3. Candidate appears arrogant or entitled: 59 percent
  4. Candidate dresses inappropriately: 49 percent
  5. Candidate appears to have a lack of accountability: 48 percent

 

But it’s not always what you say – sometimes it’s what you do. When asked to identify the biggest body language mistakes job seekers make during an interview, hiring managers named the following:

  1. Failing to make eye contact: 67 percent
  2. Failing to smile: 39 percent
  3. Playing with something on the table: 34 percent
  4. Fidgeting too much in their seats: 32 percent
  5. Crossing their arms over their chests: 32 percent
  6. Having bad posture: 31 percent
  7. Playing with their hair or touching their faces: 28 percent
  8. Having a weak handshake: 22 percent
  9. Using too many hand gestures: 13 percent
  10. Having a handshake that was too strong: 9 percent

 

Interviews give both the employer and interviewee insight into what it will be like to work together. The above interview mistakes may be extreme examples of job seeker missteps, but hiring managers also make similar mistakes that drive away excellent candidates. Before an interview, be sure to familiarize yourself with a candidate’s resume and background, be prepared with a list of targeted and general questions, and be strategic in the interview style you choose.

Tweet at @CBforEmployers: What are the biggest interview mistakes you’ve witnessed a candidate make? Was he or she able to recover? How did you react?
Categories: industry news Tags:

Are Your Employees Planning to Leave in 2017?

December 27th, 2016 Comments off
Person silhouette standing in 2017 on the hill at sunset

Now may not be the time to get too attached to workers. According to a new CareerBuilder survey, more than 1 in 5 workers (22 percent) are planning to change jobs in 2017. Among younger workers, the numbers are even higher. More than a third of workers ages 18 to 34 (35 percent) expect to change jobs in the next year.

Employee retention is critical to the long-term health and success of your business. So what can you do to make workers stay?

When asked what extra perks would make them more willing to join or stay with a company, the most popular choices workers pointed to include:

  • Half-day Fridays: 40 percent
  • On-site fitness center: 27 percent
  • The ability to wear jeans: 23 percent
  • Daily catered lunches: 22 percent
  • Employee’s own office: 22 percent

While you may not be able to offer everything on the above list, below are a few strategies you can use to retain your talent in 2017 and beyond:

Provide a competitive benefits package. You’re competing for clients and for employees. Flex schedules, health insurance and specialty insurance (such as disability and life) make a difference when it comes to attracting and keeping employees.

Create an open and honest work environment. Give feedback on work performed and be willing to listen, really listen, to the concerns of your employees.

Get employees’ input: If you want to keep your best and brightest people, involve them in the decision-making process. Not only will it serve to provide different perspectives that can lead to smarter decisions, it will also boost morale,

Provide productivity tools: Ensuring your employees have access to the tools and information they need helps ensure they can do their job more productively.

Recognize and reward good work: Monetary bonuses are always nice, but recognition of a job well done goes a long way to creating good will and loyalty. The most powerful recognition is specific. For example, “good job” is acceptable, but “good job on the rebrand project” is much better.

 

Never miss a thing: Get CareerBuilder’s expert recruitment tips in your inbox.

Clinton vs. Trump: Who’d Be a Better Boss?

November 3rd, 2016 Comments off
election boss

You might have your mind made up on who you’d want leading the country. But working for him or her could be an entirely different story. Recently CareerBuilder asked employees across the U.S. one important question: “If you had to choose, which candidate would you like to be your boss?”

According to survey results, 57 percent of workers say they would prefer to work for the former Secretary of State, Hillary Clinton – while the remaining 43 percent say they would like businessman Donald Trump as a boss.

Hillary Clinton was firmly preferred by women in the survey with 62 percent saying they would prefer the former Senator as a boss. Men were tighter in their decision between candidates, with an even split between Clinton and Trump.

Broken down by race, 52 percent of workers that identify as Caucasian would like Donald Trump as their boss. On the other hand, Hillary Clinton was the preferred choice among African American (87 percent), Hispanic (79 percent) and Asian (78 percent) professionals.

What makes a good boss? “Managers who interact frequently and communicate directly are more likely to have the support of their employees. The ideal form of that communication will vary from individual to individual, but everyone’s jobs get done better when expectations and roles are clearly defined,” said Rosemary Haefner, vice president of human resources at CareerBuilder. “The best managers understand the triggers for their workers’ success and are able to course correct when productivity drops or conflict arises.”

Should you talk politics at work? While you can’t prevent an employee from expressing his or her beliefs, you can focus on the fact that your workplace may not be the appropriate forum for such conversations. Political chatter that gets too heated can hurt both the employee and the company, so having a policy on these discussions, or a broad anti-harassment policy, is encouraged. There are many ways to approach that policy. Some companies explicitly discourage discussions of flammable political topics such as abortion, others are vaguer because of the risks of free speech in the office. What’s written in the policy is dependent on your culture; what’s important is that it’s communicated to employees.

Also remember that subordinates often look up to managers, so modeling the right behavior is imperative when in a leadership role. As a manager your job is also to be a mentor. Employees should be learning from you. If employees see their managers water cooler chats getting heated, they’ll likely think that behavior is OK.

An important note on this topic is that while speaking about politics with your peers and colleagues may be alright in a more relaxed workplace, if you’re a manager, you should refrain from speaking about politics with subordinates — doing so can put your employees in an uncomfortable position. And, on the other hand, engaging your boss in a political debate could open you up to potential retaliation in the future.

Get CareerBuilder’s expert recruiting tips and trends, right to your inbox.

This Most Absurd Excuses Workers Used to Call in Sick This Year

October 20th, 2016 Comments off
callinginsick

No one should be forced to go into work when they are sick — not only is it bad for the employee’s health and productivity, it’s also bad for the health of everyone around that person. But some employees are going to great lengths to get a free, personal day off work.

Slightly more than a third of workers (35 percent) said they have called in to work sick when they were feeling just fine in the past year. When asked why they called in sick when they were feeling well, 28 percent said they just didn’t feel like going in to work and 27 percent took the day off to attend a doctor’s appointment. Another 24 percent said they needed to just relax and 18 percent needed to catch up on sleep. Meanwhile, 11 percent took the day off to run personal errands.

Checking on the Check Up

Though the majority of employers (67 percent) give their employees the benefit of the doubt, 33 percent say they have checked to see if an employee was telling the truth in one way or another. Among employers who have checked up on an employee who called in sick, asking to see a doctor’s note was the most popular way to find out if the absence was legit (68 percent), followed by calling the employee (43 percent). As many as 18 percent of employers went the extra mile and drove past the employee’s house.

More than 1 in 5 employers (22 percent) say they have fired an employee for calling in sick with a fake excuse, on par with last year.

The Craziest Excuses for Calling in Sick

When asked to share the most dubious excuses employees have given for calling in sick, employers reported hearing the following real-life examples:


How to Stop Employees From Fibbing

Employers should take a look at what’s keeping employees off the job and then decide what they can do to help. A company’s policy on taking time off should reflect the needs of the staff.

The CareerBuilder study found that 47 percent of employers do not have a flexible PTO program where sick days, vacation days and personal days are all lumped in together. Inflexible scheduling may put an employee in the position of having to fake a cold and take an entire day off when he or she only needed a few hours to take an elderly parent to a doctor’s appointment.

Of course, as noted in the crazy excuses above, employees don’t always have a good excuse for lying – most often they simply don’t feel like coming in –  but personal needs and stress account for a large number of unscheduled absences, so being flexible in allowing workers to meet demands on the home front is important. Workers in turn are more appreciative of the company and more willing to go the extra mile.

What’s the most absurd excuse you’ve ever heard when an employee has called in sick? Tweet us at @CareerBuilder

13 Bizarre Things Candidates Have Done In Job Interviews

August 18th, 2016 Comments off
Most Unusual Things Candidates Have Done in the Interview

For many job candidates, interviews are one of the most nerve-wracking experiences they will face. It’s not surprising, since there is often a lot on the line: the job of their dreams, the ability to make their next mortgage/rent payment, or regaining a lost sense of self-esteem. With so much at stake, some candidates are doing some creative and crazy things to make sure they’re not forgotten.

CareerBuilder just released its annual survey of the most outrageous interview mistakes candidates have made, according to more than 2,000 hiring managers and HR professionals nationwide.

These are some of the most unusual tactics job seekers used to stand out – but not always for the right reasons:

  1. Candidate had a priest contact the hiring manager and ask for the candidate to be hired.
  2. Candidate bought a first class upgrade to sit next to the hiring manager on a transatlantic flight.
  3. During the month of October, a candidate came dressed in a costume for Halloween.
  4. Candidate’s wife made homemade lavender soap bars for the hiring manager as a thank you for taking the time to interview the candidate.
  5. Candidate asked the hiring manager to share an ice cream cone.
  6. Candidate sent a pair of embroidered socks with a note saying he would “knock the company’s socks off” if hired.
  7. Candidate showed up in his camp counselor attire with some of the children from the camp he worked for to show his leadership capabilities.
  8. Candidate sent a shoe with a flower in it as a thank you after the interview. The note said: “Trying to get my foot in the door.”
  9. Candidate mailed the hiring manager money in an envelope.
  10. Candidate arrived to the interview in a white limo, an hour early, dressed in a three-piece suit. The position was middle-wage and had a required dress code of khakis, company button-down and black shoes.
  11. Candidate kissed the hiring manager.
  12. Candidate gave the hiring manager a book on a subject he knew she enjoyed.
  13. Candidate wore a tie that had the name of the company he was interviewing with on it.

 

Maybe these candidates are nervous or think hiring managers would appreciate honesty — or maybe they just have no boundaries. Whatever the reason, their tactics aren’t recommended.

 

Never miss a thing: Get CareerBuilder’s expert recruitment tips in your inbox.

7 Recruitment Best Practices From the Trenches

August 16th, 2016 Comments off
7 Recruitment Best Practices From the Trenches

As the competition for talent continues to grow, companies are constantly looking for new and innovative ways to find candidates. Fortunately, there are more resources and technologies available than ever before to attract top talent to your organization — but how do you decide what strategy works best?

Learn what fellow practitioners do to differentiate themselves in a competitive talent market, and discover how you can reinvent recruitment at your own organization.

We sat down with experts who are deep in the talent acquisition trenches — Jenna King, professional recruiter II at Medix; Valerie Davenport, director of talent programs at USAA; and Bryan Rice, director, global talent acquisition at Stryker — to talk about best practices.

Here are some of their top takeaways.

1. Always inquire about new ways to attract talent.

Jenna King: “When on a phone screen, why not ask talent where they’re posting their resume? What is the newest tool they’ve heard of? What are their friends using? Take that information from them and keep tabs for trends. Then go back to your leadership and ask to invest in new trends.”

2. Analyze what IS currently working for you.

Valerie Davenport: “Spend time taking a good look at the talent who did make it through to your organization. Find out what worked, what didn’t work and what about the hiring process they would improve.”

3. Don’t throw out all old-school practices that still work.

Bryan Rice: “Where has cold calling gone? We just don’t do it. We rely heavily on in-mails and emails. That’s something that’s missing from the candidate experience. I’m not saying every candidate and every rec should be called, but if you get to the top five or six candidates, nothing makes you feel good like even a voicemail that says, ‘Hey, I saw your resume, we’d love to talk to you about a job at Stryker.’ They’re more likely to call back rather than delete an email.”

4. Data is great – but make sure you’re using it wisely.

Valerie Davenport: “When someone asks you for data, first ask: ‘What are you trying to solve? What are you looking for with this data?’

We do a lot of data and scorecard tracking. Data can tell any story, so first find out what it is you want that data to tell you. On the sourcing side, you want ROI. What is this costing? Are strategies effective? As a recruiter, that likely doesn’t mean much to you.”

5. Enlist marketing to help you with your employer brand.

Valerie Davenport: “You can’t build an employer brand on your own — you need your company’s marketing team. USAA does a great job advertising to consumers looking for insurance to retired military. But some companies are able to do both in one ad: They tell the story of the company and culture as well as advertise the product or service at the same time. You need to sell your product from the employee’s point of view, which is why you need your CHRO to talk to your marketing team. You can do both and it will cost you nothing extra.”

6. Don’t be afraid to use social media.

Bryan Rice: “About 50 to 60 percent of what Stryker puts on social media is about culture. We also advertise awards, testimonials, etc. but we think first about culture. We want people to know who we are and identify with that.”

Valerie Davenport: “You need folks at the top who understand social strategy. If your company has a social team on the enterprise team, then start with them. What you want to do is arm your team with comfort and confidence to be on social. Tell them what the rules are for your company. Social media is your call center of the future.”

7. Develop your sales and business skills.

Bryan Rice: “Recruiters need to be able to negotiate and sell. We’ve got to be able to sell in a methodical way throughout the process, negotiate, and close. Another important thing is business acumen. We need to know about the business and company we support.”

Want to learn more about what candidates expect from you during their job search? Download CareerBuilder’s 2016 Candidate Behavior Study.

How to Help Employees Overcome Financial Stress

August 11th, 2016 Comments off
Business man showing close up his empty pocket

Even in a post-recession environment, many working Americans are still struggling with anxiety over their finances. Three-quarters of Americans are living paycheck-to-paycheck to make ends meet, according to a survey from CareerBuilder, and while making ends meet is a struggle for many post-recession, those with minimum wage jobs continue to be hit the hardest. Of workers who currently have a minimum wage job or have held one in the past, 66 percent said they couldn’t make ends meet, and 50 percent said they had to work more than one job to make it work.

Workers may not be taking full advantage of their available saving opportunities, either. According to the survey, 16 percent of all workers have reduced their 401k contribution and/or personal savings in the last year, 36 percent do not participate in a 401k plan, IRA or comparable retirement plan, and 25 percent have not set aside any savings each month in the last year.

Perhaps in effort to help struggling employees, employers are taking a stance and advocating for higher pay. Not only do the majority of employers think minimum wage should be raised, but more employers than last year feel this way. Only 5 percent of all employers believe the federal minimum wage ($7.25 per hour) is fair. The majority (67 percent) feel a fair minimum wage is $10 or more per hour, up from 61 percent last year; and 15 percent say a fair minimum wage is $15 or more per hour, up from 11 percent last year. Sixty-four percent of employers believe minimum wage should be increased in their state, up from 62 percent in 2014.

But although 67 percent of employers feel a fair minimum wage is $10 or more per hour, of those hiring minimum wage workers this year, almost half (48 percent) said they’re going to pay less than $10.

  • Less than $8:00: 11 percent
  • $8.00-$8.99 per hour: 23 percent
  • $9.00-$9.99 per hour: 14 percent
  • $10.00-$10.99 per hour: 21 percent
  • $11.00-$11.99 per hour: 7 percent
  • $12.00-$12.99 per hour: 8 percent
  • $13.00-$13.99 per hour: 6 percent
  • $14.00-$14.99 per hour: 5 percent
  • $15.00 or more per hour: 6 percent


How You Fit In

If you want your business to run smoothly, consider how you can unobtrusively help your employees with their finances. While employers are not always able to raise wages, many have found ways to offer additional perks or benefits that can help employees who are struggling. For example, offering financial counseling as part of their retirement savings package or even looking at local perks, such as movie ticket discounts or deals with nearby restaurants.

There’s a reason companies invest in employee wellness programs: They are good for the company and good for employees. Investing in financial health is similar. Here are a few other things employers can do to help employees be more financially stable:

  • Host workshops on topics such as personal budgeting, credit managing, estate planning, estimating retirement savings and investment basics.
  • Hire experts to provide detailed information on complicated finance issues, such as an attorney speaking to employees about creating a will.
  • Organize lunch-and-learn seminars about financial topics such as understanding the stock market.
  • Provide one-on-one counseling to discuss monthly budgeting and contributions to a 401(k).

 

The best way to know which benefits employees want most is to ask. Listening to their needs and trying to tailor benefits goes a long way toward helping employees feel more financially secure – and more loyal to the company.