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5 Things to Remember When Utilizing Data in Health Care Hiring

March 14th, 2017 Comments off
health care hiring

The health care industry is experiencing phenomenal growth, and with growth comes a demand for more talent. According to the 2017 CareerBuilder Health Care Talent Brief, 38 percent of health care industry professionals expect job demand to continue to outpace overall supply.

“Competition to fill these spots is fierce, especially in small, rural markets,” says Bobbi Hicks, President of Akeso Talent Engagement. The correct use of data in your hiring strategy can provide an advantage without incurring the high costs of a recruitment service.

1. Invest in tools that pull real-time data.

“Decision makers respond to facts and data. That said, it’s important to invest in tools that can provide you with a real-time snapshot of the market that you support,” Hicks says. “We regularly use paid recruiting tools like job boards, Supply & Demand, compensation portals, and social media sites to scope out our competitors and better predict salary ranges and time to fill.”

2. Pull compensation data more often.

Most health care companies pull compensation data once or twice a year. That’s not nearly enough, says Hicks. Pay rates change frequently due to high competition. Your staff likely picks up extra shifts at competing hospitals, so they know firsthand what the competitor is offering.

“You don’t want to risk training your leaders for another facility, because you didn’t compensate them correctly on the front end,” says Hicks.

Stay ahead of the curve by pulling compensation data quarterly.

3. Utilize Supply & Demand data to address the talent deficit.

“If you’re not utilizing Supply & Demand data, then you should be,” says Hicks. By tracking the number of nurses and therapists coming onto the market, you can locate where the talent deficit is, project how substantial it will be, and adjust your hiring strategy accordingly.

4. Include “NOT” statements in Boolean searches.

Boolean search is a helpful way to source candidates faster, but most researchers only utilize “and” and “or” statements. Including “not” statements allows you to exclude terms and narrow results. For example, “pharmaceutical and not sales” would yield candidates who have “pharmaceutical” in their resume, but exclude those with “sales.”

5. Don’t forget about culture.

Competitive compensation and large sign-on bonuses only go so far when attracting and retaining talented employees. You should strive to create a positive culture that values both the employee and patient experience.

“A $15,000 sign-on bonus puts up a red flag,” says Hicks. “Whenever I see that I think: ‘What’s going on over there that makes such a sizable bonus necessary to attract employees?’”

Proper onboarding — and off-boarding — can go a long way toward improving the employee experience and retaining top talent. Many times employees will leave to develop their skill sets elsewhere, but return seeking more senior positions. Ending the working relationship in a professional manner increases the likelihood that a talented employee will come back.

Put insight into action: Learn more about how to use data in health care hiring right now.

The Importance of a Defined Talent Strategy: Q and A with Talent Strategy Institute Founder Al Adamsen

April 5th, 2016 Comments off
Defined talent strategy

“Talent strategy” might not be a four letter word, yet many organizations are still afraid to use the term, according to Al Adamsen, founder and executive director of Talent Strategy Institute. That may stem from the inability to define what it truly means and understand how it fits into a company’s overall business strategy. Yet having a clear game plan for acquiring and keeping top talent is crucial to a company’s success.

We interviewed Adamsen to gain insight on how organizations can build a winning talent strategy and the key role workforce analytics plays in its development and execution.

CB: Companies that want to stay ahead of the competition need a talent strategy in addition to other key business strategies. Where do you see data coming into play within a company’s talent strategy?

AA: When talking to business leaders and HR executives, ask them, “Do you regard people as a key asset? Do you have a people strategy? Can you share with me how you formulate, manage and message?” It’s likely that no one will share this information because they don’t have it.

Let’s talk about how to do this – how to consciously create the candidate and employee experience. Some of the questions you need to ask include:

  • Where do analytics come in to play? You have to know what is and isn’t already in place.
  • Who are your high performers and how are they identified? No one is happy with their performance benchmarks.
  • How do you understand what is keeping people at your company? Historical measures might not be appropriate. Let’s track this through the life cycle.
  • What is the best source for this data – internal, external or both? How would you value each of these sources?

 

When it comes to turn around, think about what your leaders want or need to know. Some might be focused on the wrong things, so you need to prioritize and then find out what data you need.

CB: Why is it so important for organizations to understand what a talent strategy is?

AA: I often cite the quote, “The beginning of wisdom is starting with the right terms.” “Talent strategy” is rarely used as a term by an organization. Really defining what a talent strategy is and how it fits into your business planning cycle is crucial. The organizations that are creating workforces well are measuring and finding ways to manage the success of the process. Organizations must focus on data, technology and people – if you only focus on one of these pillars, the boat is not going to float.

CB: Do you think companies should be establishing workforce analytics teams within HR, or should HR teams skill up to do more data analysis for talent forecasting?

AA: In today’s market, not many truly get this and fewer are addressing it. It’s one of the reasons why our discipline hasn’t matured. The person doing this work needs to have the internal cache to say, stop – we need to take a look at our performance management.

HR teams need to hire someone responsible for all four buckets of workforce intelligence capability: HR metrics, surveys, analytics and workforce planning. You need all four buckets funneling through one person, otherwise you’re just creating a lot of noise. This person shouldn’t be too senior or too junior. If they are too high level, they might not be willing to get into the “weeds.” If they are too junior, they may not have the ability to tell the story with the data.

CB: You mentioned that while workforce analytics is a hot topic, only about 20-25 percent of all companies are actually using workforce analytics data to drive decisions. What holds those other organizations back?

AA: Two things hold them back. The first is leadership involvement, and a leader’s decision to do the work. Many sit back and ask for insight, but they don’t support HR or the owner of the process with the right resources. Leaders have to make a conscious decision to make it a priority.

Also, organizations need someone to focus on this effort. Creating a story around the data is a full-time job – not a part-time one. If you are a large enterprise, five key roles are needed to be committed to it.

CB: Why would a company want to consider using a partner for external workforce analytics data vs. having an internal team do the work?

AA: Even if you are large company, this might be too much for one person. It might make sense to ask for help from an external team with more expertise. Smaller companies should really consider going externally. For this to take hold, there needs to be a reoccurring event where this data is displayed, whether that’s through a quarterly meeting, event, etc. If you use an external partner, it’s still important to have someone internally to lead and manage the process.

CB: How do you recommend telling a story with data, and how can this practice help HR when having conversations with key stakeholders who don’t understand workforce planning?

AA: When telling a story with data to stakeholders, it should come from an advisor who can build trust by offering ideas based on insights that have been empirically derived. Leaders often don’t know what questions to ask, so analysts need to do the work for them. It’s an analyst’s job to test new hypotheses and either validate facts or bust myths.

Al Adamsen is a globally recognized thought leader, advisor and educator in the areas of Talent Strategy, Workforce Planning and Analytics, Talent Measurement and Organizational Change. He’s the founder and executive director of the Talent Strategy Institute, a global association committed to expanding the production and use of meaningful workforce insight. For more on Adamsen, check out his LinkedIn profile.

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