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Should You Support a Minimum Wage Increase?

October 23rd, 2014 Comments off
Should you support a minimum wage increase?

A recent CareerBuilder survey makes it clear that 3 in 5 employers support a minimum wage increase.

In the survey, employers were also asked about why they supported or opposed an increase. To what extent does the academic literature in economics support their arguments? Let’s take a look:

For: The minimum wage improves the standard of living.

This is the most common reason given by employers in support of an increase. However, the minimum wage in the U.S. has not been shown to have a large effect on poor families. Indeed, only a minority of minimum wage workers live in poor families. Second, and quite sadly, in many poor families, no one has a job. Therefore, while the minimum wage does increase the incomes of individual minimum wage workers, it has a small effect on the incomes of poor families.

For: The minimum wage has a positive effect on employee retention.

This is the second most common reason given by employers in support of a minimum wage increase. Both theory and evidence from economic studies support this claim. However, I do wonder: Why don’t employers increase wages of their own accord if they want to increase employee retention? Why wait for a minimum wage increase?

Not sure where you stand? Check out these 3 things you need to know about the battle to raise minimum wage.

Against: The minimum wage causes employers to hire fewer people.

This is the most popular reason given by employers against increases. In some cases, the increase does indeed cause employers to hire fewer people. But the most solid evidence from the U.S. shows that, overall, minimum wage increases have no effect on the level of employment in the economy.

Against: The minimum wage causes issues for small businesses struggling to get by.

This is the second most popular reason given by employers against a minimum wage increase. Both theory and evidence suggest that profits do decline after an increase, especially in small businesses. However, it’s also been found that minimum wage increases do not cause more businesses to shut down.

 

What are your thoughts? Are you for or against a minimum wage increase, and why?

U.S. to Add 2.5 Million Middle-Skill Jobs From 2013-2017

October 20th, 2014 Comments off
U.S. to Add 2.5 Million Middle-Skill Jobs From 2013-2017

Middle-skill jobs are on the rise and projected to overtake both high- and low-skill jobs over the next few years, according to data by Economic Modeling Specialists Intl. (EMSI), a CareerBuilder company, in tandem with a new report from USA Today.

The U.S. is expected to add 2.5 million net new middle-skill jobs within just a four-year span between 2013 and 2017, which is 37 percent of all projected growth. To put that into context, that number is slightly greater than the 36 percent growth of low-skill jobs and significantly more than that of high-skill jobs (27 percent).

According to EMSI:

Middle-skill jobs requiring some post-secondary education but less than a bachelor’s degree are expected to make up the largest share of new jobs.

What are some examples of middle-skill jobs, you ask? It runs the gamut from radiation therapists to elevator installers and repairers to dental hygienists. And in general, middle-skill jobs would earn U.S. workers about $13 or more an hour in terms of median hourly wages.

What does this mean for you?

Are middle-skill jobs part of your workforce equation? The term “middle-skill jobs” may have somewhat of a stigma associated with it, and we can start changing such perceptions by embracing these jobs of tomorrow and using data to start preparing for the demand sooner rather than later.

As EMSI notes:

MIT professor Paul Osterman told USA TODAY that there will be “tremendous demand” for middle-skill workers as baby boomers retire. And already, middle-tier job growth is going strong in key regional economies.

Want access to more data? Read EMSI’s entire report here.

Want to receive Talent Factor by email? Subscribe here and get a brand new recruiting industry statistic delivered to your inbox every Monday. Join the conversation on Twitter: #TalentFactor.

3 Talking Points From the September 2014 Jobs Report

October 3rd, 2014 Comments off
3 Talking Points From the September 2014 Jobs Report

If there’s a little extra pep in our step today, it’s not just because it’s Friday — it’s because a surprisingly strong September jobs report emerged this morning, picking up momentum once again following a notably lackluster report last month.

Not only that, the unemployment rate finally dipped below 6 percent for the first time in six years.

As you may know, following each month’s jobs report, we read dozens of news reports, scour the Web, and break what we find down to three key talking points you can use. Whether you’re taking a break at the office water cooler or conversing with peers in the industry, you’ll have three conversation starters in your pocket.

HERE’S THE NEWS YOU CAN USE FROM TODAY’S RELEASE:

1. Economists are (probably) doing a happy dance. OK, so they may have been off by a mere 33,000, but at least the outcome was more positive than expected. U.S. employers added 248,000 jobs in September, which beat the 215,000 additional jobs that economists had predicted. That puts the average job gains per month at 200,000-plus over the past year.

Granted there’s more complexity to the situation, but can we please just celebrate tiny victories?

3 Talking Points From the September 2014 Jobs Report

2. As if that weren’t enough… Remember the weak numbers we cringed at when the August jobs report came out? Well (thankfully!), those numbers were revised up. August’s numbers were revised up from 142,000 to 180,000 and July’s jobs numbers also got a bump from the previously estimated 212,000 to 243,000. To save you from doing some math, that’s a total of 69,000 jobs more.

3. Now for the not-so-great news. Labor force participation rate continues to be a cause for concern every time the BLS releases a jobs report. This was no exception, as it dropped from 62.8 percent to 62.7 percent and continues to hover at a three-decade low. Compare that to the 66 percent it was prior to the recession — a time you can probably barely remember.

In case you’re looking for handy, easily digestible charts from the just-released jobs report, Quartz has some with highlights.

Don’t miss the jobs report buzz! Follow us on Twitter @CBforEmployers and live tweet with us starting at 8:30 a.m. EST on the first Friday of every month as part of #JobsFriday.

Did you miss the JuneJuly and August jobs report breakdown? It’s never too late to catch up on some economy-related reading.

3 Talking Points From the August 2014 Jobs Report

September 5th, 2014 Comments off
3 Talking Points From the August 2014 Jobs Report

August turned out to be lukewarm and disappointing at best in more ways than one. First, instead of having a continuous streak of 90-degree days in Chicago (my favorite kind), the average temps hovered in the 60s and low-70s. Even more devastating, though, is the August BLS jobs report released this morning, which revealed that U.S. employers added 142,000 jobs in August. No guys, that’s not a typo — it really is only 142,000. Guess how many economists were expecting? 225,000.

3 Talking Points From the August 2014 Jobs Report

As you may know, following each month’s jobs report, we read dozens of news reports, scour the Web, and break what we find down to three key talking points you can use. Whether you’re taking a break at the office water cooler or conversing with peers in the industry, you’ll have three conversation starters in your pocket.

HERE’S THE NEWS YOU CAN USE FROM TODAY’S RELEASE:

1. The sobering stats. You better sit down for this. While the unemployment rate dipped ever so slightly from 6.2 percent to 6.1 percent, U.S. employers added a mere 142,000 jobs in August. That, of course, is nowhere near the 225,000 jobs that some economists were expecting. Seriously — that’s not even kind of close with a difference of 83,000. Not only does that make August the month with the lowest level of job growth in 2014, but it also means our 6-month streak of adding 200,000-plus jobs per month has officially ended.

2. Even prior months look a bit gloomier. Even though July’s job  growth numbers were revised up by a modest 3,000 — from 209,000 to 212,000 — the BLS revised down June’s numbers quite a bit more — from 298,000 to 267,000. That’s 31,000 jobs fewer than we thought we had added. Now, if you’re more of a glass-half-full person, then you may be interested in putting the whole thing in context.

3. Were there any winners? (Sort of.) Retail job growth stopped its upward trend in August, when it instead shed more than 8,000 jobs. Meanwhile industries such as manufacturing, transportation and wholesale trade remained relatively stable. The big winner was business services, which added 47,000 jobs, followed by healthcare with 34,000; hospitality with 22,000; and construction with 20,000.

In case you’re looking for handy, easily digestible charts from the just-released jobs report, Quartz has some with highlights.

Don’t miss the jobs report buzz! Follow us on Twitter @CBforEmployers and live tweet with us starting at 8:30 a.m. EST on the first Friday of every month as part of #JobsFriday.

Did you miss the MayJune and July jobs report breakdown? It’s never too late to catch up on some economy-related reading.

Why More Veteran Nurses Are Saying “No” to Retirement

August 18th, 2014 Comments off
Why more nurses are saying "no" to retirement

Foreword by Dana Naquin, health care marketing manager, CareerBuilder:

In the recent past, there has been a lot of concern surrounding the risk of a nursing shortage because of an increase in the aging of both the workforce and general population. This, in turn, creates the perfect storm for a potential coverage gap when it comes to nursing care. Add to this, the fact that nurses are asked to take on more and more responsibilities as organizations look to reduce costs.

Why more veteran nurses are saying "no" to retirementHowever, things might be looking up. The article below was recently featured in H&HN magazine and challenges these concerns. In the midst of the recent recession, many nurses decided to delay retirement and continue working to ensure financial security. It turns out that many of these nurses are continuing to work past the average retirement age and this could have a significant impact on the feared shortage.

For recruiters and HR leaders this means increased flexibility when working on long-term strategic planning. Look for ways to engage your older workforce and place them in roles where they can excel and take on tasks that younger workers might not be ready for. How about some of those tasks that nurses have been asked to take on that they previously weren’t responsible for? Is there value in possibly splitting those duties with younger nurses?  Read on to learn more about the study and get additional insight in to how older nurses may be the key to preventing a shortage.

More RNs are opting to forego retirement, averting an expected shortage — but why?

Phil, an older friend of mine who’s been in the hospital with a broken hip, was surprised when one of his nurses mentioned that she was 20 years younger than her husband — and that her husband was a year Phil’s senior.

“That makes the guy 89,” Phil told me when I stopped by to visit over the weekend. “So this woman is 69, and she’s still running around taking care of patients. I don’t know how she does it.”

Turns out there are quite a lot of nurses working well past what typically is considered retirement age. A study published earlier this month in Health Affairs found that of those RNs working at age 50 between 1991 and 2012, 24 percent continued to work as of age 69. Delayed retirement is one of the reasons the size of the RN workforce grew to 2.7 million in 2012, significantly above of the 2.2 million that experts were expecting a decade ago. Unlike Phil’s nurse, however, most RNs tend to leave the hospital setting as they age:

“Older nurses are far more likely to work outside of the hospital than younger RNs are,” the study authors wrote.

The Affordable Care Act is prompting a reorganization of clinical processes, with more care delivered outside the hospital — in homes and ambulatory care facilities — and increasing the demand for nurses. Older RNs are filling that gap. In the past, H&HN has reported on hospitals that encourage veteran nurses to remain on the job by using a variety of incentives — from offering flexible scheduling to hiring staff to lift and move patients so older RNs don’t have to.

How Hospitals Can Improve the Workplace for All Nurses

A couple of recent reports spotlight other ways hospitals can improve work for nurses of all ages. Physical work environments that help nurses to complete tasks without interruption, communicate easily with other nurses and physicians, and do their jobs efficiently are related to higher job satisfaction, according to the results of a nationwide survey published this month in Research in Nursing & Health. And on July 21, The Wall Street Journal’s Laura Landro wrote about hospitals that are changing traditional work practices with the goal of tripling the amount of time nurses spend on direct patient care. Among the tactics: shifting routine tasks to certified nurse assistants and other less highly skilled staff; moving supplies — as well as computers with access to patient records — to inside patient rooms; and having pharmacists deliver medications to patient floors. As Landro noted, the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation’s Transforming Care at the Bedside program is intended to help hospitals increase to 70 percent the amount of time nurses spend on direct patient care.

 By Bill Santamour, H&HN Managing Editor

H&HNOriginally published on August 5, 2014 on H&HN Daily. Reprinted with permission from H&HN magazine online. Copyright 2014 by Health Forum Inc. All rights reserved.

3 Talking Points from the July 2014 Jobs Report

August 1st, 2014 Comments off
talking points about job numbers

You may have noticed temperatures starting to dip slightly as we head into the last few weeks of summer — and, as evidenced by the July jobs report released this morning, the U.S. economy appears to have cooled off a bit too. As you may know, following each month’s jobs report, we read dozens of news reports, scour the Web, and break what we find down to three key talking points you can use. Whether you’re taking a break at the office water cooler or conversing with peers in the industry, you’ll have three conversation starters in your pocket. HERE’S THE NEWS YOU CAN USE FROM TODAY’S RELEASE:

  1. A summer cool down. The U.S economy added 209,000 jobs in July, quite a bit less than the 230,000 that economists were expecting. Meanwhile the unemployment rate ticked up slightly to 6.2 percent from 6.1 percent the previous month. “Not too hot, not too cold,” as some are calling today’s reactions to the report.
  2. Silver lining, maybe? For one thing, June’s jobs report numbers were revised up from 288,000, which was previously reported, to 298,000. And May’s numbers were revised up from 224,000 to 229,000. Also, if you were keeping count, this happened to be the sixth straight month that the economy has added at least 200,000 jobs. The last time that happened was back in 1997.
  3. These industries are powering forward. Professional and business services are leading the way in terms of job creation, with an addition of 47,000 jobs in July. Manufacturing came in second with 28,000 jobs created, while retail wasn’t too far behind with 27,000 jobs.

In case you’re looking for handy, easily digestible charts from the just-released jobs report, Quartz has some with highlights.

Don’t miss the jobs report buzz! Follow us on Twitter @CBforEmployers and live tweet with us starting at 8:30 a.m. EST on the first Friday of every month as part of #JobsFriday.

Did you miss the AprilMay and June jobs report breakdown? It’s never too late to catch up on some economy-related reading.

Top 10 Metros with the Biggest Share of Post-Recession Job Creation

July 7th, 2014 Comments off

careerbuilder talent factorIt’s no secret the Great Recession has changed many things: baby boomers have a larger share of jobs, consumers are more financially responsible, and now, as illustrated by new research from CareerBuilder and EMSI, certain metro areas are more competitive, thanks to a surge in post-recession job creation.

CareerBuilder and EMSI recently looked at total job growth across industries for each of the 50 most populous U.S. metros from 2010 to 2013. They then compared each metro’s expected job growth from 2010 to 2013 (based on national job growth trends) with its actual job growth to find which metros are exceeding national job growth trends.

For instance, from 2010 to 2013, total U.S. employment grew 4 percent. At this rate, it would be expected for Houston to add 142,378 jobs during this time; however, Houston actually added 250,607 jobs, giving it a share of 3.6 percent of total employment and making it the top metro area with the biggest share of post-recession job creation. Here’s the rest of the list. TWEET THIS

Top 10 Metros with the Biggest Share of Post-Recession Job Creation

MSA Total Employment in 2013 Jobs added 2010-2013 Jobs expected to be added 2010-2013 Percentage of total employment
Houston 3,030,835 250,607 142,378 3.6%
Dallas 3,370,536 221,161 130,742 2.7%
San Francisco 2,336,223 165,768 80,549 3.6%
Los Angeles 6,282,545 283,664 207,319 1.2%
Austin 929,439 84,774 29,152 6.0%
Phoenix 1,956,524 124,501 70,263 2.8%
Miami 2,540,304 134,588 83,934 2.0%
San Jose 1,040,777 90,559 46,767 4.2%
Detroit 1,932,779 125,330 89,148 1.9%
Riverside 1,432,813 76,646 42,412 2.40%

Want to receive Talent Factor by email? Subscribe here and get a brand new recruiting industry statistic delivered to your inbox every Monday. Join the conversation on Twitter: #TalentFactor.

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3 Talking Points from the June 2014 Jobs Report

July 3rd, 2014 Comments off

3 Talking Points from the June 2014 Jobs ReportMaybe the U.S. economy sensed the jobs report would be released around the Fourth of July and wanted to steal its thunder because this was one (surprisingly) healthy jobs report released this morning. And before you check your calendar to make sure you’re not losing your mind, yes, the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics did release the June 2014 report a day earlier because of the holiday weekend.

As you may know, following each month’s jobs report, we read dozens of news reports, scour the Web, and break what we find down to three key talking points you can use. Whether you’re taking a break at the office water cooler or conversing with peers in the industry, you’ll have three conversation starters in your pocket.

HERE’S THE NEWS YOU CAN USE FROM TODAY’S RELEASE:

1. Time to celebrate? Why not! Not that you shouldn’t take these numbers with a grain of salt, but since the country is in a celebratory mood already, let’s take a minute to smile at the fact that employers added 288,000 jobs in June, which was quite a bit more than the 215,000 jobs that economists had anticipated. What’s more, the unemployment rate fell from 6.3 percent to 6.1 percent, which is the lowest it has been since back in September 2008.

3 Talking Points from the June 2014 Jobs Report

2. More good news … or maybe people are just in a generally good mood. Not only were April and May’s jobs numbers revised up — a total of 29,000 jobs MORE than was originally reported by the BLS — but also I guess you could say we’re on a roll. This jobs report solidifies the fact that we now have the “best five-month stretch of job creation” in about eight years. As one economist told The Wall Street Journal: “This is one welcome Fourth-of-July report for the outlook. [The 288,000 new jobs] are just the fireworks the economy needs to brighten up.” Um, if you say so, sir.

3 Talking Points from the June 2014 Jobs Report

3. Yay for lower wage jobs! (Wait, what?!) You heard that right. This jobs report shows that lower-wage sectors are winning when it comes to job creation each month. For instance, retail added more than 40,000 jobs and leisure/hospitality added 39,000. Some of the higher-wage sectors such as manufacturing and construction are running the race a little bit slower, with 16,000 and 6,000 respectively.

In case you’re looking for handy, easily digestible charts from the just-released jobs report, Quartz has some with highlights.

Don’t miss the jobs report buzz! Follow us on Twitter @CBforEmployers and live tweet with us starting at 8:30 a.m. EST on the first Friday of every month as part of #JobsFriday.

Did you miss the MarchApril and May jobs report breakdown? It’s never too late to catch up on some economy-related reading.

Dude, Where’s Your College Degree? How Education Is Impacting Employment

June 19th, 2014 Comments off

Dude, Where's Your College Degree? How Education Is Impacting EmploymentDon’t let reality shows like The Real Housewives or The Escape Club fool you into thinking our collective education level as a society has taken a nosedive over the past few years. In fact, we’re hearing from employers that there’s been a notable shift lately toward a more educated workforce.

This post is based on information from the book “The Talent Equation” co-written by CareerBuilder’s CEO Matt Ferguson. Find more interesting stats here.

In 2013 CareerBuilder surveyed more than 2,700 hiring managers and HR managers across the U.S. to find out their views on education level and hiring. What we found was a strong preference for college-educated workers. In fact, the number of employers who require at least some college education is far above the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics’ educational requirement estimates.

In fact, nearly a third (32 percent) of employers are hiring college-educated individuals to work in jobs that were previously filled with those who had high-school degrees. TWEET THIS

Take a look at the minimum education requirements for jobs, and notice how nearly 1 in 5 (18 percent) employers have increased their educational requirements over the past five years. TWEET THIS

Minimum education requirement for jobs

One question you may be asking is WHY. Why are employers increasing their educational requirements for applicants? Is it because they simply have more to choose from and raising the bar makes screening easier? Or have they actually found a higher level of education to be beneficial to the bottom line?

Take a look at what we found.

Do employees with college degrees have a greater impact?

This means employers are in fact finding that in some ways, the more educated the workforce the better business results they’re seeing in some areas.

Tell us in the comments below or tweet us @CBforEmployers: Have you increased your educational requirements when screening applicants? If so, are you noticing a difference? 

Today’s data-driven hiring climate is difficult to navigate. We get it. “The Talent Equation” can help you make sense of it and propel your business forward. You can download a sample chapter here.

How to Find the Hottest Cities to Recruit Engineering Talent

June 17th, 2014 Comments off

What are the top cities for hiring engineers, and why?It’s no secret that engineers are hard to recruit. Using CareerBuilder’s Supply & Demand Portal, we find that engineers are harder to recruit than 75 percent of occupations. Using the Hiring Indicator tool, we can do a market comparison and study top candidate areas for engineering talent.

 

Hiring indicator for top cities to find engineering talentCities that are easier for recruiters are places where there is relatively more available talent given the number of available vacancies. The market study reveals that New York City is the best area to recruit, followed by Dallas and Chicago.  At the other end, among places with a large supply of engineers, San Jose is the hardest area to recruit in: It has very high demand relative to the supply of candidates.

Where Pay Fits In 

However, ease of recruitment is only one dimension that is relevant. As a recruiter, you should also take into account pay. So, for example, pay tends to be higher in New York and San Jose, and somewhat lower in Dallas and Chicago. Interestingly, a new study shows that pay tends to be higher in areas where more foreign STEM (Scientists, Technology professionals, Engineers, and Mathematicians) workers locate. And indeed, the share of white engineers is around 50 percent is Chicago and Dallas, close to 40 percent in New York and below 40 percent in San Jose. In fact, in San Jose, where the pay is the highest, 52 percent of engineers are Asian. Therefore, areas with more non-white engineers do tend to pay more.

Is High Pay a Plus for Recruiters?

Is higher pay a good or a bad thing for you as a recruiter? On the one hand, obviously higher pay is costly for your budget. On the other hand, you get what you pay for. Therefore, higher pay may be the symptom of better talent. In fact, the study I mentioned above finds that a greater influx of foreign STEM workers in a city increases the productivity in that city. In other terms, those cities with high pay and a larger share of non-white STEM workers may well also be more productive.

What would you choose? Would you rather recruit in an area with higher pay and more productive STEM candidates or an area with lower pay and relatively less productive candidates?

Have questions about the Supply & Demand Portal or want more information? Call 877.479.0682 or email supplydemandportal@careerbuilder.com today.

3 Talking Points from the May 2014 Jobs Report

June 6th, 2014 Comments off

Three takeaways from the May 2014 jobs report.At first glance, the numbers coming out of the May jobs report released this morning look as good as National Donut Day feels — job gains lived up to economists’ expectations; the unemployment rate remained unchanged; we finally recouped the jobs lost during the recession; and this was the first four-month stretch with 200,000-plus job gains since the 1990s. But there’s always more to the story, so (grab some free donuts and) read on to find out.

As you may know, following each month’s jobs report, we read dozens of news reports, scour the Web, and break what we find down to three key talking points you can use. Whether you’re taking a break at the office water cooler or conversing with peers in the industry, you’ll have three conversation starters in your pocket.

HERE’S THE NEWS YOU CAN USE FROM TODAY’S RELEASE:

1. Slow flat and steady wins the race? The U.S. economy added 217,000 jobs in May. For the most part, we remained relatively flat across the board: The unemployment rate was unchanged at 6.3 percent; the labor force participation rate in May also remained unchanged at 62.8 percent. TWEET THIS

Even the number of long-term unemployed — individuals who have been jobless for 27-plus weeks — stayed steady at 3.4 million.

2. Employment is back to pre-recession level, but hold the high-fives.

U.S. employers have (finally!) recouped the 8.7 million jobs lost during the recession. TWEET THIS According to CNN Money: “There are now more jobs in the country than ever before. The last time we were near this point was January 2008.” But, as with every economy-related update, you should always take these numbers with a grain of salt and understand that the economy is still quite a ways from being considered truly healthy.

3. Winners and losers of May’s jobs report. Health care emerged a winner this morning with gains of 34,000 jobs in May, which is twice the average gain per month that we’ve seen over the past year. April, on the other hand, emerged the loser with that month’s jobs numbers being revised down by 6,000 — from 288,000 to 282,000. Still, job growth over the past 12 months has averaged 197,000 jobs.

Watch Matt Ferguson, CEO of CareerBuilder and co-author of The Talent Equation, discuss the jobs report and U.S. labor market issues on Bloomberg TV’s “Market Makers.”

In case you’re looking for handy, easily digestible charts from the just-released jobs report, Quartz has some with highlights.

Don’t miss the jobs report buzz! Follow us on Twitter @CBforEmployers and live tweet with us starting at 8:30 a.m. EST on the first Friday of every month as part of #JobsFriday.

Did you miss the FebruaryMarch and April jobs report breakdown? It’s never too late to catch up on some economy-related reading.

An Interactive Map Of Boomers and Millennials in the Workforce

June 5th, 2014 Comments off

Then & Now: An Interactive Map Of Boomers and Millennials in the WorkforceWhile Jay-Z and Solange Knowles recently grabbed headlines for engaging in a heated elevator tussle, baby boomers and millennials have also been battling it out — in the workforce, that is.

Following the recession, boomers have far outpaced millennials in the jobs recovery by taking up a growing share of the workforce while millennial employment has lagged quite significantly.

New analysis from CareerBuilder and Economic Modeling Specialists Intl. tracks changes to boomer and millennial segments of the workforce in 175 U.S. metros.

Jobs recovery at an uneven pace

Not that the recession was easy — by any stretch of the imagination — on either demographic, but baby boomers have emerged notably stronger from the recession with more jobs in STEM fields and other occupations as compared to millennials, who have struggled to keep the same pace.

By how much, you ask?

Between 2007 and 2013, the number of jobs held by baby boomers grew 9% (a gain of 1.9 million jobs) while millennial employment grew only 0.3% (an increase of 110,000 jobs) during the same time. TWEET THIS

Boomer vs millennial employment growth between 2007 and 2013

If you look at it another way, the population of 55 and older Americans has grown 20 percent since 2007, which is FOUR TIMES as fast as prime-working age millennials (ages 25-34), according to BLS data. TWEET THIS

The population of Americans 55 and older has grown 4 times as fast as prime working-age millennials.

In fact, CareerBuilder CEO Matt Ferguson addresses the growth of boomers in the workforce today, but also cautions employers to look and plan ahead.

Matt Ferguson quote on the growth of boomers in the workforce today

And in case you’re curious, these are the U.S. metros with fastest job growth for boomers and millennials.

Metros with the fastest job growth for boomers and millennials

OK, so what does that mean?

“The recession prompted boomers and millennials to approach the labor market differently,” said Matt Ferguson, CareerBuilder CEO and co-author of The Talent Equation. “Confronted by weaker entry-level job prospects, young professionals left the workforce in greater numbers or took lower paying jobs that didn’t take immediate advantage of their degrees. Older workers, on the other hand, often had to postpone retirement to recoup lost savings.

He goes on to say:

“In a depressed labor market, we ideally want more people to acquire college degrees, but the rates of graduates did not spike during the recession. This suggests rising costs prohibited many people in need of new skills from obtaining them, a trend that needs to be reversed going forward.”

Want to know how the job outlook has changed for boomers and millennials as well as the 175 most populous U.S. metros for these workers over the past few years? Check out this interactive map of millennials and boomers in the workforce.

3 Talking Points from the April 2014 Jobs Report

May 2nd, 2014 Comments off

Three takeaways from the August 2013 jobs report.Much like the twists and turns on popular TV shows today like “Game of Thrones” or “Scandal,” the BLS monthly jobs reports tend to evoke a roller coaster of emotions ranging from happiness, to disbelief, to disappointment, to gratitude, to anger, to confusion. And the April jobs report released this morning was no different. As you may know, following each month’s jobs report, we read dozens of news reports, scour the Web, and break what we find down to three key talking points you can use. Whether you’re taking a break at the office water cooler or conversing with peers in the industry, you’ll have three conversation starters in your pocket. HERE’S THE NEWS YOU CAN USE FROM TODAY’S RELEASE:

1. Good news! (But is it really?) If you awoke to joyous Twitter banter this morning, it may have been people rejoicing about the April jobs report. U.S. employers added 288,000 jobs in April, which is a whole lot more than the 218,000 economists were initially expecting. Even better, the unemployment rate dropped to 6.3 percent, which is the lowest it’s been since September 2008. BUT, like all good things there must be a catch, right? Right. (Thanks a lot, economy.)

 

 

 

 

 

 

2. People are dropping (out of the workforce) like flies. As it turns out, the catch to the low unemployment rate is the labor force participation rate, which has now fallen to approximately a 30-year low of 62.8 percent. The labor force shrank by 806,000 and the number of people who are employed dropped by 73,000. These reports are such a roller coaster of emotion, I tell ya. 3. We’re on a roll — sort of. March’s employment numbers were revised up, from 192,000 to 203,000 jobs. And so was February’s — from 197,000 to 222,000 jobs. These new revisions mean the U.S. economy has averaged 190,000 jobs over the past year, thanks to some math that Forbes kindly did. In April it was business services (75,000), retail trade (35,000) and construction (32,000) jobs that led the way.

In case you’re looking for handy, easily digestible charts from the just-released jobs report, Quartz has some with highlights.

Don’t miss the jobs report buzz! Follow us on Twitter @CBforEmployers and live tweet with us starting at 8:30 a.m. EST on the first Friday of every month as part of #JobsFriday.

Did you miss the January and February and March jobs report breakdown? It’s never too late to catch up on some economy-related reading.

A Time of Re-Building: What’s Driving the Construction Jobs Recovery?

May 1st, 2014 Comments off

What's driving the construction jobs recovery?I know what you’re thinking: The recession took a bigger swing at U.S. construction jobs than Miley Cyrus’ wrecking ball did to her tween fans everywhere.

“I came in like a wrecking ball,
Yeah, I just closed my eyes and swung…”

Um…thanks, economy.

But in case you find yourself thinking, “Man, we hear about health care jobs and software jobs all the time, but what about those poor folks in construction?” don’t feel too bad. Despite the fact that construction employment in the U.S. hasn’t returned to its glory days (i.e. pre-2008), we are seeing glimmers of hope.

According to new analysis from CareerBuilder and Economic Modeling Specialists International (EMSI), commercial and industrial building is outpacing residential construction, even though there’s been solid growth in remodeling and new housing developments.

But what’s the fastest growing sector over the past few years, you ask? That’d be heavy and civil engineering construction.

In terms of new building construction, residential sector jobs are expected to grow 3 percent in the time period between 2011 and the end of this year. That amounts to more than a million jobs. As you might imagine, commercial building jobs are expected to increase even faster – at a rate of 4 percent. That amounts to approximately 764,000 jobs.

What does that mean in the context of the overall economy?

“It will be awhile before employment in construction reaches levels seen during the housing bubble, but recent job growth, particularly in residential remodeling and industrial construction, signal healthier consumer confidence and private-sector investment. The industry is an important economic bellwether, as growth has positive ripple effects up and down supply chains. Fortunately, we’re seeing significant year-over-year increases in job listings on CareerBuilder across a range of titles, including laborers, building inspectors, carpenters and operating engineers.” – Matt Ferguson, CEO of CareerBuilder

Want to know more? Read the entire press release here.

A Time of Re-Building: What’s Driving the Construction Jobs Recovery?

May 1st, 2014 Comments off

What's driving the construction jobs recovery?I know what you’re thinking: The recession took a bigger swing at U.S. construction jobs than Miley Cyrus’ wrecking ball did to her tween fans everywhere.

“I came in like a wrecking ball,
Yeah, I just closed my eyes and swung…”

Um…thanks, economy.

But in case you find yourself thinking, “Man, we hear about health care jobs and software jobs all the time, but what about those poor folks in construction?” don’t feel too bad. Despite the fact that construction employment in the U.S. hasn’t returned to its glory days (i.e. pre-2008), we are seeing glimmers of hope.

According to new analysis from CareerBuilder and Economic Modeling Specialists International (EMSI), commercial and industrial building is outpacing residential construction, even though there’s been solid growth in remodeling and new housing developments.

But what’s the fastest growing sector over the past few years, you ask? That’d be heavy and civil engineering construction.

In terms of new building construction, residential sector jobs are expected to grow 3 percent in the time period between 2011 and the end of this year. That amounts to more than a million jobs. As you might imagine, commercial building jobs are expected to increase even faster – at a rate of 4 percent. That amounts to approximately 764,000 jobs.

What does that mean in the context of the overall economy?

“It will be awhile before employment in construction reaches levels seen during the housing bubble, but recent job growth, particularly in residential remodeling and industrial construction, signal healthier consumer confidence and private-sector investment. The industry is an important economic bellwether, as growth has positive ripple effects up and down supply chains. Fortunately, we’re seeing significant year-over-year increases in job listings on CareerBuilder across a range of titles, including laborers, building inspectors, carpenters and operating engineers.” – Matt Ferguson, CEO of CareerBuilder

Want to know more? Read the entire press release here.

3 Talking Points from the March 2014 Jobs Report

April 4th, 2014 Comments off

Three takeaways from the August 2013 jobs report.If you live in a city like Chicago where the weather is constantly freezing and dreary in flux, your reaction to a sunny 40-degree day is, “Eh…it’s not ideal, but we’ll take it.” That’s the type of reaction economic experts had to the March jobs report released this morning by the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics, following the past few winter months that consistently fell short of expectations.

As you may know, following each month’s jobs report, we read dozens of news reports, scour the Web, and break what we find down to three key talking points you can use. Whether you’re taking a break at the office water cooler or conversing with peers in the industry, you’ll have three conversation starters in your pocket.

HERE’S THE NEWS YOU CAN USE FROM TODAY’S RELEASE:

  1. Eh…it’s not ideal, but we’ll take it. U.S. employers added 192,000 jobs in March, which fell slightly short of the 200,000 jobs that some economists had expected. Meanwhile, the unemployment rate held steady at 6.7 percent. The interesting thing is that if we look at the private sector, the labor market is officially back to the pre-recession peak. In the words of a Columbia Business School professor, “This current jobs report doesn’t move me in any significant way.” Touché, sir.
  2. These industries came out on top. We’re all winners here. Just kidding, THESE industries won the March jobs report: professional and business services, which went up by 57,000; restaurants and bars, which registered a jump of 30,000 jobs; as well as hiring improvements in construction, mining and logging, and health care.
  3. January and February employment numbers got a boost. January’s numbers were revised up 15,000 (from 129,000 to 144,000) and February’s numbers were revised up 22,000 (from 175,000 to 197,000). That’s significant. If you do the math, that’s 37,000 MORE jobs than were previously reported, if you combine the two months. Those revisions bring the 3-month average to 178,000 jobs added in the first quarter of this year.

In case you’re looking for handy, easily digestible charts from the just-released jobs report, Quartz has some with highlights.

Don’t miss the jobs report buzz! Follow us on Twitter @CBforEmployers and live tweet with us starting at 8:30 a.m. EST on the first Friday of every month as part of #JobsFriday.

Did you miss the DecemberJanuary and February jobs report breakdown? It’s never too late to catch up on some economy-related reading.

Show Me MORE Money! President Obama Aims to Expand Overtime Pay

March 14th, 2014 Comments off

President Obama signed an executive order this week that’s aimed at broadening the expansion of overtime pay for millions of U.S. workers, who at the moment are not getting paid for their extra hours of work.

Most hourly workers today are expected to get paid time-and-a-half if they work beyond 40 hours a week. The same does not apply to salaried workers, however — with the exception of those who earn less than $455 a week.

This proposal in particular targets salaried workers who do in fact earn more than $455 a week but do not, under current rules, qualify for overtime pay because of their management status, even if their managerial duties are negligible.

“Unfortunately, today millions of Americans aren’t getting the extra pay they deserve,” President Obama said. Even Cecilia Muñoz, the director of the White House Domestic Policy Council, has said: “We need to fix the system so folks working hard are getting compensated fairly.”

The question is who will be most impacted by this proposal?

For starters, several million fast food managers, loan officers, computer technicians and their peers who are classified by employers as “executive or professional” so that employers can get away with not paying overtime.

Read our recent study about the decline of middle-wage jobs in the U.S., which lags far behind high- and low-wage jobs.

There are some naysayers to the proposal who argue that such a move may force employers — small business owners, in particular — to trim down their workforce. For instance, Daniel Mitchell, a senior fellow with the Cato Institute, voiced his reluctance suggesting that “there’s no such thing as a free lunch. If they push through something to make a certain class of workers more expensive, something will happen to adjust.”

On the other end of the spectrum are those who predict the move would actually boost the U.S. economy by expanding the circle of workers who’ll be able to put more money in their pockets at the end of the day. Some economists have also speculated that the move could push some employers to go ahead and hire more workers instead of paying time-and-a-half.

Jared Bernstein, former chief economic adviser to Joe Biden and former executive director of the White House Task Force on the Middle Class, said: “I think the intent of the rule change is to make sure that people working overtime are fairly treated. I think a potential side effect is that you may see more hiring in order to avoid overtime costs, which would be an awfully good thing right about now.”

This move comes on the heels of the president’s efforts to raise the federal minimum wage. You may remember that earlier this year, he signed an executive order that would require businesses with with new or renewed federal contracts to pay minimum-wage workers $10.10 starting next year, instead of $7.25.

Tell us in the comments below what you think of the proposal to overhaul overtime pay.

3 Talking Points from the February 2014 Jobs Report

March 7th, 2014 Comments off

Three takeaways from the August 2013 jobs report.Brr… While much of the country continues to trudge through record-breaking (and unwelcome) amounts of snow and ice, the U.S. economy appears to be thawing — at least a little. This is evidenced by some positive news coming out of the February 2014 jobs report released this morning by the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics.

As you may know, following each month’s jobs report, we read dozens of news reports, scour the Web, and break what we find down to three key talking points you can use. Whether you’re taking a break at the office water cooler or conversing with peers in the industry, you’ll have three conversation starters in your pocket.

HERE’S THE NEWS YOU CAN USE FROM TODAY’S RELEASE:

    1. Better, but not good. February’s jobs numbers exceeded economists’ expectations (it’s been a while since that happened, eh?). The U.S. economy added 175,000 jobs in February, quite a bit higher than the 150,000 jobs economists were expecting. If you’re the type of person who looks at the glass as half full, you’ll notice that job growth has picked up compared to the past two months. It’s still hard to ignore the fact that this pales in comparison with 200,000, the average pace of jobs added between June and November 2013. Also, the unemployment rate ticked up ever so slightly from 6.6 percent to 6.7 percent.
    2. Wintry weather woes? The big question leading up to the February jobs report was whether wintry conditions would drastically impede hiring. Turns out, it was not as huge a deterrent as some expected, but it still did impact the job market. As many as 6.9 million full-time workers saw their hours being temporarily reduced citing the bad weather as the culprit — the last time it was this bad was back in January 1996.
    3. These industries get a gold star. The big winner was professional and business services, adding 79,000 — this included 16,000 new positions in accounting and bookkeeping. Other industries that deserve special mention include construction and food services. The construction industry added 15,000 jobs — not that this is a huge improvement from the past, but it’s positive if you take wintry conditions into the equation. Restaurants and bars also fared well, adding 21,000 jobs — because who doesn’t like to eat, amiright?

In case you’re looking for handy, easily digestible charts from the just-released jobs report, Quartz has some with highlights.

Don’t miss the jobs report buzz! Follow us on Twitter @CBforEmployers and live tweet with us starting at 8:30 a.m. EST on the first Friday of every month as part of #JobsFriday.

Did you miss the NovemberDecember and January jobs report breakdown? It’s never too late to catch up on some economy-related reading.

3 Talking Points from the January 2014 Jobs Report

February 7th, 2014 Comments off

Three takeaways from the August 2013 jobs report.Valentine’s Day is right around the corner and love is in the air — but it looks like jobs are getting the cold shoulder. January’s BLS numbers released this morning painted quite a grim picture of yet another consecutive jobs report with weaker-than-expected numbers.

The U.S. economy added 113,000 jobs in January, and the unemployment rate ticked down a hair to 6.6 percent. Meanwhile, the labor force participation rate rose ever so slightly from 62.8 percent to 63 percent. But before you think that’s a good thing, keep in mind that number is quite a bit lower than a year ago and, according to the Wall Street Journal, “hovers near 35-year lows.”

Where is employment Cupid when you need him?

As you may know, following each month’s jobs report, we read dozens of news reports, scour the Web, and break what we find down to three key talking points you can use. Whether you’re taking a break at the office water cooler or conversing with peers in the industry, you’ll have three conversation starters in your pocket.

HERE’S THE NEWS YOU CAN USE FROM TODAY’S RELEASE:

  1. Not so fast, economists. Today’s jobs report numbers fell short of economists’ expectations. By a lot. AGAIN. Whereas they were expecting the number of jobs U.S. employers added in January to be 185,000, we clocked in at 113,000 — no need to bust out your calculator; that’s a difference of 72,000.
  2. Boo to the bad weather? If you’ve spent at least part of the winter huddled under a blanket in your home, you’re not the only one. By all accounts, this winter has been a particularly brutal one. BUT, can we blame the poor performance of today’s report as well as the past few jobs reports on weather conditions? Reports we read said, “Not so fast.” We can blame Mother Nature for taking a toll on our social lives, but not on the economy.
  3. December was pretty bad after all. Remember how people freaked out as the December 2013 jobs report numbers started coming out? It was an epic fail. Once people picked their jaws off the floor, many were hopeful that eventually those numbers would be revised up quite dramatically. But no, they weren’t — unless you think a jump from 74,000 to 75,000 is worth writing home about.

Don’t miss the jobs report buzz! Follow us on Twitter @CBforEmployers and live tweet with us starting at 8:30 a.m. EST on the first Friday of every month as part of #JobsFriday.

Did you miss the August, SeptemberOctoberNovember and December jobs report breakdown? It’s never too late to catch up on some economy-related reading.

More People Have Multiple Jobs, But Fewer Are Self-Employed

February 6th, 2014 Comments off

self-employmentMany U.S. workers were forced to put their dream of working for themselves on hold thanks to the recession, which weakened the market for self-employment.

Between 2001 and 2006 self-employment experienced rapid growth: A whopping 1.8 million new self-employed jobs were added during this period.

However, the number of self-employed jobs around the country has dropped by 936,000 since the start of the recession and hasn’t recovered since, according to a new report by CareerBuilder and Economic Modeling Specialists Intl.

To put that in context, since self-employment peaked in 2006, the number of self-employed jobs has fallen by 9 percent, BUT the number of jobs for salaried employees has gone up by 4 percent.

quizPop Quiz:
Below you’ll see a list of two groups of industries. One of the groups experienced the most significant gains in self-employment while the other saw the biggest drops. Let’s see if you can figure out which is which. Then scroll all the way to the bottom to find the answers. No cheating!
GROUP 1
Landscaping
Maids
Personal care aides.
Photography
GROUP 2
Agriculture
Real estate
Child care
Retail trade

A snapshot of self-employment today

Today there are an estimated 10 million self-employment jobs in the U.S., which amounts to 6.6 percent of all jobs. That percentage has dipped from a high of 7.2 percent back in 2006 prior to the recession.

For the purposes of this report, self-employed workers comprise individuals who consider self-employment a significant part of their income or time working. Folks who we didn’t count in this category include owners of incorporated businesses, freelancers and those who have smaller, secondary sources of income.

Interestingly, more U.S. workers today are landing themselves second and third jobs to supplement their income — 1 in 5 full-time workers either has a second job or plans to get one this year — but fewer workers have taken the leap of giving up their day jobs to work for themselves.

Also, if you break it up demographically, men take up a much larger share (nearly two-thirds) of self-employed jobs compared to women — and nearly 1 in 3 of self-employed individuals are 55 years or older.

Interesting information, huh? You can read the full report here.
Oh, and if you took the quiz, Group 1 experienced the biggest GAINS in self-employment while Group 2 struggled to make self-employment work and saw the biggest declines. Did you get it right?

5 Highlights for Employers from the 2014 State of the Union

January 29th, 2014 Comments off

State of the UnionYou may have anticipated that President Obama would discuss hot topics such as jobs, wages and the skills gap — issues that are top of mind for employers — during last night’s State of the Union address. And if you saw last night’s speech, you would have seen that he didn’t disappoint. If you missed last night’s speech or if you’re just looking for a quick recap of the topics that matter to you, you’ve come to the right place. Here are five highlights.

1. Raising the minimum wage. President Obama discussed an executive order to raise the minimum wage for new federal contracts to $10.10 an hour. Why? “Raising the minimum wage will make sure no family of four with a full-time worker has to raise their children in poverty.” His message to those watching: “Do what you can to raise wages — it’s good for the economy, and it’s good for America.”

2. Closing the skills gap. The president briefly touched on the need to close the skills gap for ready-to-fill jobs through techniques such as offering more on-the-job training, more apprenticeships and partnering with community colleges to train people to get up to speed. Fortunately, our recent research shows that 1 in 2 employers will train new hires to close the skills gap instead of waiting around endlessly for qualified candidates. If you’re trying to close the skills gap in your company, here are 10 useful tips.

Fun fact: If you were live tweeting #SOTU last night, you helped to generate as many as 1.7 million tweets during the telecast. The top three trending topics were Mad Men, Min Wage and Healthcare.

3. Long-term unemployment. The topic of long-term unemployment also came up during the State of the Union, when the president announced he’s getting some prominent corporations to sign a pledge stating that they won’t discriminate against the unemployed and will consider qualified people even if they fall under the long-term unemployed category. You may be aware of the stigma that, for whatever reason, exists but to see how extensive it is, check out this study showing how some employers are more likely to pursue candidates with less relevant experience who have been unemployed for a short while rather than more qualified candidates who have been unemployed long term. Even a recent CareerBuilder survey found that nearly 1 in 3 people who were previously employed full-time said they couldn’t even land a single job interview since becoming unemployed a year ago or longer. What’s more, 1 in 4 long-term unemployed can’t afford food, 1 in 10 have lost their home or apartment, and a similar number have resorted to moving back home with their parents.

4. Veteran hiring. You may have heard the president proudly point to his wife when discussing Joining Forces, the White House initiative to assist military families. Led by  First Lady Michelle Obama (who recently keynoted Disney’s “Veterans Institute” workshop) and Dr. Jill Biden, the initiative puts military hiring in the spotlight. If you’re looking to find and attract military veterans but need some advice on how to move forward, here are nine practical tips to help you. And if you’re asking yourself: ”Why should I hire a military veteran?” an even better question is “Why wouldn’t you?” Consider the fact that 7 in 10 veterans feel prepared when they entered the civilian workforce following active duty.

5. Gender pay gap. Though women comprise about half of today’s workforce, they are still only paid 77 cents on every dollar a man earns, which the president called an embarrassment in the present day. “It’s time to do away with workplace policies that belong in a ‘Mad Men’ episode,” he said. Did you know men and women have starkly different views of gender inequality in the workplace, even when it comes to income? While 38 percent of women felt they earned less than their male counterparts, 84 percent of men believe males and females with the same qualifications are paid the same, according to a 2011 CareerBuilder survey.

ICYMI, here’s a complete transcript of the State of the Union.

Tell us what you thought of the State of the Union — including your top takeaways — in the comments below. Or tweet us @CBforEmployers.

Long-Term Unemployed: Stretched Thin but Staying in (Professional) Shape

January 23rd, 2014 Comments off

Plight of the long-term unemployedSorry E! but no one cares about the frivolous plight of rich kids of Beverly Hills (hunting for mansions or getting mani-pedis every other day), when some are struggling to put food on the table and a roof over their heads. I’m referring, of course, to the segment of the U.S. population labeled “long-term unemployed.” These individuals have been out of the workforce for 12 months or more — and not by choice.

According to a new CareerBuilder survey, 1 in 4 long-term unemployed can’t afford food, 1 in 10 have lost their home or apartment and a similar number have resorted to moving back home with mom and dad. More than 1 in 10 have reported maxing out their credit cards just to pay other bills. These tough conditions have caused 25 percent of long-term unemployed to experience tensions and strained relationships with friends and family.

What’s worse, nearly 1 in 3 people who were previously employed full-time said they couldn’t even land a single job interview since becoming unemployed a year ago or longer.

So how do these folks make it? Nearly 2 in 5 rely on a spouse or partner to provide and nearly 1 in 3 have had to dip into their savings, while others have picked up side jobs (12 percent) or have had to borrow from those close to them to make ends meet (9 percent).

Want a visual breakdown of this data? Don’t miss this infographic.

Getting people back to work

In between applying for jobs, many of the long-term unemployed hone their skills by growing their professional networks or volunteering (1 in 5), signing up with a recruiter or staffing firm (nearly 1 in 5), working part-time (14 percent) and taking classes (12 percent).

Still, many of their efforts are besieged by challenges. Here are some of the most common ones, along with our suggestions of how YOU can help.

  • 1 in 3 are afraid their age or experience works against them. This fear is even more pronounced among individuals older than 55, with more than 90 percent pointing to their age as a contributor to their long-term unemployment. Tip: Don’t forget that mature candidates bring a wealth of knowledge to an organization and can mentor others.
  • More than 3 in 5 say it’s their long-term unemployment situation itself that turns many employers off. Tip: Don’t overlook talented, skilled workers because of hidden biases that are unfounded.
  • Nearly 2 in 5 say the number of jobs in their profession isn’t nearly what it used to be prior to the recession. Tip: Consider widening the net of potential candidates who might be a good fit for your company and offer options to close the skills gap.
  • Nearly 1 in 3 find it even more challenging to find a job because they can’t relocate or travel far. Tip: Ever considered having remote workers if they’ve got the skills you need?
  • Nearly 1 in 5 have their eyes set on a different industry or field, but are finding the transition hard. Tip: Consider hiring and training individuals who don’t have experience in their industry to get them skilled up, like nearly half of employers are planning to do.

Amid much of this doom and gloom, the silver lining is that companies like CareerBuilder have dedicated their existence to empowering employment. See how you can join the fight to put people back to work.

3 Talking Points from the December 2013 Jobs Report

January 10th, 2014 Comments off

Three takeaways from the August 2013 jobs report.Remember when Jennifer Lawrence fell on her way up the stairs to receive her Oscar Award for Best Actress in front of millions of viewers? That was sort of an epic fail — but in a cute way, because who doesn’t love J-Law (and also, who hasn’t daydreamed about cake)? Unfortunately, we saw another epic fail with the release of today’s jobs report, except there was nothing cute about it.

Economists were expecting the U.S. economy to add 197,000 jobs in December — but they were off by a hefty 123,000. So whether you’re at brunch or a dinner party this weekend, don’t expect too many glasses to be clinking in a toast to this report.

As you may know, following each month’s jobs report, we read dozens of news reports, scour the Web, and break what we find down to three key talking points you can use. Whether you’re taking a break at the office water cooler or conversing with peers in the industry, you’ll have three conversation starters in your pocket.

HERE’S THE NEWS YOU CAN USE FROM TODAY’S RELEASE:

  1. How low can it go? Sorry we asked. The U.S. economy added 74,000 jobs in December. This was not just lower than expected; it was the smallest job gain in in three years. Considering the momentum the economy picked up over the past few months, this was sort of a fail. Even the Wall Street Journal called it an “ugly” jobs report. Ouch!
  2. The unemployment rate is like sunshine on a frigid day — it looks deceptively good. OK, so the unemployment rate dropped from 7 percent to 6.7 percent, the lowest since October 2008. But in case you saw that and got a bit excited, don’t be. It appears to be mostly a result of more people dropping out of the labor force.
  3. Some winners, many losers. The big winners of this jobs report? Drumroll, please… retailers and manufacturers, with both posting noteworthy hiring increases. Unfortunately, not too many other industries had the same kind of luck in December.

Don’t miss the jobs report buzz! Follow us on Twitter @CBforEmployers and live tweet with us starting at 8:30 a.m. EST on the first Friday of every month as part of #JobsFriday.

Did you miss the August, SeptemberOctober and November jobs report breakdown? It’s never too late to catch up on some economy-related reading.

New Year, New Employer: 1 in 5 Workers Expect to Change Jobs in 2014

January 9th, 2014 Comments off

1 in 5 workers plan to change jobs in 2014Eat healthy. Drink less. Travel to a new place. Visit the gym more. Who are we kidding — just JOIN a gym. These are the typical resolutions you might expect to find on people’s lists this time of year.

But employers, brace yourselves: As many as 1 in 5 (21 percent) U.S. workers are getting ready to walk out your door by resolving to change jobs this year, according to a new CareerBuilder survey of more than 3,000 full-time employees. TWEET THIS

To put that number in context, it’s up from 17 percent last year, and is at its highest since the Great Recession.

The question is, WHY are people giving their two weeks notice and running for the hills? And who is most at risk?

I Can’t Get No Satisfaction!

That’s the tune many employee are singing today. Get this — since last year, worker satisfaction has dropped seven points (from 66 percent to 59 percent).

Salary concerns (66 percent) and not feeling valued (65 percent) at work are the biggest culprits for the 18 percent who say they’re dissatisfied (up from 15 percent last year). TWEET THIS

How can you as an employer mitigate such concerns? Rosemary Haefner, vice president of human resources for CareerBuilder, offers a few tips: “Offering frequent recognition, merit bonuses, training programs and clearly defined career paths are important ways to show workers what they mean to the company.” So if you haven’t already, it may be time to start thinking along those lines.

What makes them go and what makes them stay?

Workers can become your biggest flight risks when they…

  • Are downright dissatisfied with their jobs (58 percent).
  • Can’t see the pathway to advancement opportunities (45 percent).
  • Want better work-life balance options (39 percent).
  • Are underemployed (39 percent).
  • Are highly stressed. Mini breakdown alert! (39 percent).
  • Don’t really think their boss performs that well (37 percent).
  • Didn’t get that promotion even though they felt they deserved it (36 percent).
  • Have less mileage with the company — two years or less.(35 percent).
  • Are stuck with the same old pay (28 percent).

Consider improving these areas in particular to try to prevent a looming exodus.

It isn’t ALL bad news though: 8 in 10 workers (79 percent) say they aren’t planning to go anywhere. While there may not be a magic bullet to solve your retention problems, factors besides the typical good salary (43 percent) and good benefits (49 percent) can help.

Among the top reasons workers cited for staying in their jobs, good co-workers (54 percent), good work-life balance options 50 percent), a good boss (32 percent) and the sense of feeling recognized and valued (29 percent) ranked high on the list.

We want to hear from you: Were you surprised by these stats? What retention tips have you found to be most effective in your company? Tell us in the comments below or tweet us @CBforEmployers.

Click here to read the full report. And you may also be interested to find out why 60 percent of millennials are leaving their dream jobs.

3 Talking Points from the November 2013 Jobs Report

December 6th, 2013 Comments off

Three takeaways from the August 2013 jobs report.If you hear someone today screaming, “Hooray for the unemployment rate!” please don’t punch them in the face. They mean well. They’re probably just talking about the good news coming out of the Bureau of Labor Statistics’s November 2013 jobs report, which was released this morning. Probably the biggest highlight was that the U.S. unemployment rate has ticked down to the lowest in five years. That’s huge, right? Well, there are some caveats, so keep reading.

As you may know, following each month’s jobs report, we read dozens of news reports, scour the Web, and break what we find down to three key talking points you can use. Whether you’re taking a break at the office water cooler or conversing with peers in the industry, you’ll have three conversation starters in your pocket.

HERE’S THE NEWS YOU CAN USE FROM TODAY’S RELEASE:

  1. How low can it go? The unemployment rate just fell to a 5-year low, dropping to 7 percent from 7.3 percent in October. The last time it was at 7 percent or lower was exactly 5 years ago in Nov 2008. But before you go throwing parties over this news, bear in mind that the month-to-month drop is at least partially reflective of federal workers returning to work following the government shutdown in October.
  2. Better than expected — but with a twist. The economy added 203,000 jobs in November. This number is way better than economists expected. Predictions varied from 180,000 to about 185,000 depending on which outlet you read. We’ve also now had back-to-back months in which more than 200,000 jobs have been added. Plus, the under-employment rate has ticked down to 13.2 percent from 13.8 percent in October. But once again, we can thank the return of furloughed federal workers at least in part for that drop.
  3. It’s still cold out there. And no, we’re not just talking about the freezing temps. The 4.1 million long-term unemployed — defined as people who have been out of work for 27 weeks or more — remained relatively unchanged. This continues to be a significant pain point, as long-term unemployment remains near historic highs.

Don’t miss the jobs report buzz! Follow us on Twitter @CBforEmployers and live tweet with us starting at 8:30 a.m. EST on the first Friday of every month as part of #JobsFriday.

Did you miss the AugustSeptember and October jobs report breakdown? It’s never too late to catch up on some economy-related reading.

3 Talking Points from the October 2013 Jobs Report

November 8th, 2013 Comments off

Three takeaways from the August 2013 jobs report.Whether it’s Gangnam Style, the Harlem Shake or Marina Shifrin’s catchy “I Quit” video that went viral last month, it’s OK to do a little happy dance today. (Your co-workers will probably thank you if you can refrain from doing so in public.) That’s because there’s surprisingly good news coming out of the October 2013 jobs report released this morning by the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics.

Following each month’s jobs report, we read dozens of news reports, scour the Web, and break what we find down to three key talking points you can use. Whether you’re taking a break at the office water cooler or conversing with peers in the industry, you’ll have three conversation starters in your pocket.

Here’s the news you cAN use from today’s big release:

  1. Oh economists, you cynics! Turns out there’s surprisingly good news coming out of today’s jobs report, according to many leading analysts and media outlets. Get this: Even though the unemployment rate ticked up ever so slightly (7.3 percent, up from 7.2 percent), the U.S. added 204,000 jobs in October – that’s 84,000 MORE than the 120,000 jobs economists were expecting. Also, not to minimize the repercussions of the 16-day partial government shutdown, but it didn’t have as much of an impact on the October jobs report as many economists had initially feared. You know that saying “Expect the worst, hope for the best?” Seems pretty applicable today.
  2. August and September numbers were revised up. As if to keep the good times rolling, the new jobs report revised up previously reported numbers for both August and September by a combined 60,000. Here’s a breakdown: August added 238,000 jobs (revised up from 193,000) while September added 163,000 jobs (revised up from 148,000).
  3. These sectors get gold stars. The leisure and hospitality sector led the way, adding 53,000 of the 204,000 new jobs in October. (A special toast to food services and drinking places, which accounted for 29,000 of those 53,000 jobs.) Retail came in second, adding 44,000 jobs; we of course know many retailers are gearing up for the holidays.

Don’t miss the jobs report buzz! Follow us on Twitter @CBforEmployers and live tweet with us starting at 8:30 a.m. EST on the first Friday of every month as part of #JobsFriday.

Did you miss the August and September jobs report breakdown? It’s never too late to catch up on some reading.

New Report: The Fastest-Growing Occupations and Metro Areas in the U.S.

November 7th, 2013 Comments off

CB_Job_Outlook_2013Much like the man Katy Perry once sang about, the labor market can be a temperamental beast: It’s hot, then it’s cold…it’s up, then it’s down. And then it just stops texting you back altogether. For example, in the next five years (2013 to 2017), the U.S. workforce is projected to grow 4.4 percent, which is faster than the 2009-2013 period (3.5 percent), but not as fast as the pre-recession period of 2003-2007 (5.8 percent).

This finding comes from a new occupational outlook report from CareerBuilder and Economic Modeling Specialists International (EMSI), which explores projections over a five-year period by occupation, wage group and education level for the United States and the 52 largest metropolitan areas. The report provides key insight into the future of the labor market, which employers can use to spot trends that will have an impact on their business in coming years.

The report outlines the following projections, which identify many of the key labor market realities laid out in Ferguson’s new book (and unofficial nominee for Oprah’s book club), The Talent Equation: Big Data Lessons for Navigating the Skills Gap and Building a Competitive Workforce, co-written by CareerBuilder CEO Matt Ferguson.

Workforce Projections 2013-2017: Key Findings

  • The U.S. workforce is projected to grow 4.4 percent from 2013 to 2017—faster than the 2009-2013 period (3.5 percent), but still down from the pre-recession 2003-2007 period (5.8 percent).
  • At 5 percent, high-wage occupations ($21.14 and above) are expected to grow faster than low-wage ($13.83 and below) and medium-wage ($13.84-$21.13) occupations—4.7 percent and 3.3 percent, respectively.
  • 75 percent of the 165 occupations expected to lose jobs nationally are in the middle-wage category.
  • Occupations requiring college degrees are growing significantly faster than those that do not. Associate degree and master’s degree occupations are each projected to grow 8 percent, while jobs requiring short-term, on-the job training trail at 4 percent. Bachelor’s degree jobs are projected to grow 6 percent.
  • 23 of the 52 largest metro areas will outpace the projected national rate of job growth, led by three in Texas (Austin, Houston and San Antonio); Raleigh, NC, and Phoenix, AZ. Washington, D.C. is poised have the largest share of new jobs coming from the high-wage sector, but San Antonio is expected to have the fastest rate of high-wage growth.

Fastest-Growing Occupations: 2013-2017

The report also looks at the fastest-growing occupations that are projected to see at least 8 percent growth and 30,000 jobs added from 2013 through 2017, the top 10 of which are listed below.

  1. Personal Care & Home Health Aides:
    • New Jobs: 473,965; 21% increase
    • Median Hourly Earnings: $9.77
  2. Market Research Analysts & Marketing Specialists
    • New Jobs:  60,889; 14% increase
    • Median Hourly Earnings: $29.10
  3. Medical Secretaries
    • New Jobs:  76,386; 14% increase
    • Median Hourly Earnings: $15.17
  4. Emergency Medical Technicians & Paramedics
    • New Jobs:  30,234; 13% increase
    • Median Hourly Earnings: $15.28
  5. Software Developers (Systems & Applications)
    • New Jobs: 110,049; 11% increase
    • Median Hourly Earnings: $47.64
  6. Medical Assistants
    • New Jobs: 60,109; 10% increase
    • Median Hourly Earnings: $14.35
  7. Registered Nurses
    • New Jobs: 256,703; 9% increase
    • Median Hourly Earnings: $32.04
  8. Network & Computer Systems Administrators
    • New Jobs: 34,825; 9% increase
    • Median Hourly Earnings: $35.14
  9. Pharmacy Technicians
    • New Jobs: 31,975; 9% increase
    • Median Hourly Earnings: $14.29
  10. Landscaping & Groundskeeping Workers
    • New Jobs: 111,444; 9% increase
    • Median Hourly Earnings: $11.07

The full report, America’s Job Outlook: Occupational Projections 2013-2017, includes a detailed analysis on projected growth by wage group and education requirements, as well as projections for the 52 largest metropolitan areas. (For a technical note on methodology and definitions, please see the sections at the end of the report.)

Three Talking Points from the September 2013 Jobs Report

October 22nd, 2013 Comments off

Three takeaways from the August 2013 jobs report.The day we’ve all been waiting for is finally here. No, unfortunately Friends didn’t announce a reunion, but after a government shutdown-induced delay, we finally got our hands on the BLS’ September jobs report this morning.

As you know, we read dozens of news reports and scour the web following each month’s jobs report and break it down to three key talking points for you. So whether you’re taking a break at the office water cooler or conversing with peers in the industry, you’ll have three conversation starters in your pocket.

Here’s today’s big news:

  1. U.S. employers added 148,000 jobs, trailing behind expectations. Many economists predicted that employers would add about 180,000 jobs in September. So they probably just settled for OJ instead of champagne this morning.
  2. The unemployment rate is at its lowest since 2008. That’s right, the unemployment rate dropped from 7.3 percent to 7.2 percent in September, which is the lowest it has been since November 2008. Many online reports claim this IS in fact a piece of good news (you know how skeptical everyone is) because 73,000 people joined the labor force.
  3. Overall, no one’s throwing a party over the employment situation. According to a CNNMoney article, economists called today’s report a “mixed bag,” “underwhelming” and “disappointing.” Similar sentiments are echoed by other online news reports that would seriously give McKayla Maroney a run for her money.

Follow us on Twitter @CBforEmployers and live tweet with us starting at 8:30 a.m. EST on the first Friday of every month as part of #JobsFriday.

Did you miss the last jobs report breakdown? It’s never too late to catch up on some reading.

How Employers in a Small U.S. Town Bring in Big Talent

October 7th, 2013 Comments off

North-DakotaWith an estimated 18,532 full-time residents, the town of Williston, N.D. doesn’t sound like a hotbed of economic activity. Yet, the formerly sleepy agriculture town – located in the northwest corner of the state, just 70 miles south of the Canadian border – is estimated to gain 10,000 jobs over the next five years, an increase of 27 percent, according to EMSI’s Talent Market Analyst.

In other words, Williston is growing nearly five times faster than the rest of the country. Despite the positive outlook, the challenge remains: How will employers find talent for these newly created roles?

This isn’t the first time employers in this area have faced such a challenge. Around 2008, when developers started using the controversial hydraulic fracturing method (also known as “fracking”) to reach untapped oil underneath the Bakken formation, Williston’s economy began to boom. With the sudden increase in opportunities, oil company employers were faced with the challenge of convincing thousands of workers to relocate to northwest North Dakota.

The solution, they soon realized, was money. Today, salary remains a major selling point for employers in this area trying to attract top talent. Williston boasts an average salary of $92,000, a whopping 55 percent more than the nationwide average. And it’s not just oil and gas jobs in this area that command six-figure salaries: Employees in wholesale trade command over $111,000 a year, while workers in the real Estate and rental and leasing industry average over $113,000 annually. Even those in the manufacturing sector – an industry typically at the bottom of the pay scale – average $80,000 a year in Williston.

Geologists estimate that only 6 percent of the oil around Williston is currently available for extraction, meaning the more technology advances, the more oil and gas activity in the region. As Williston approaches more than 50,000 jobs across all industries in 2018, it remains to be seen how the town itself will deal with rapid expansion.

In my next post, I’ll look at the town of Cupertino, Calif., where more than 12,000 Apple employees work. I’ll examine how Cupertino embraced this rapid growth, and how Williston’s labor market may have more in common with Silicon Valley than one might think.

Unlock Data on Job Growth in IT and Finance With This Interactive Map

September 12th, 2013 Comments off

Unlock data on job growthToday you can do virtually anything with the click of a mouse: Make online purchases, complete online courses, donate to disaster relief – AND, of course, unlock rich data detailing job growth and job concentration in the top U.S. metros thanks to this interactive map.

The map was created by CareerBuilder in tandem with Economic Modeling Specialists Intl., or EMSI, and is based on EMSI’s market database of more than 90 national and state employment resources.

Simply hover over the map of the U.S. to see the size of the total workforce, the average earnings per job and the percentage job growth since 2010. You can use it more specifically to drill down and get a detailed snapshot of which metros have added the most jobs following the recession in both the IT and finance industries.

To see which industries and cities are driving job growth in metros across the country, read our recent post on “The Hiring Site.”

Insights in IT

When browsing by industry, select “Information” on the right-hand side of your screen. This will give you a dropdown menu on some of the sub-categories of IT:

  • Software publishers.
  • Motion picture and video industries.
  • Sound recording industries.
  • Radio and television broadcasting.
  • Cable and other subscription programming.
  • Wired telecommunications carriers.
  • Wireless telecommunications carriers (except satellite).
  • Data processing, hosting and related services.
  • Internet publishing and other information services.

Clicking on one of these sub-categories will reveal on the map where the greatest density of such jobs exist. Seattle, Boston and San Francisco hold the greatest concentration of jobs in software publishing, for example. It will also provide a snapshot of job growth in metros across the nation: The map shows you that Greenville, Chapel Hill and Madison have witnessed the most growth in software publishing since 2010.

According to Eric Presley, CareerBuilder’s chief technology officer, the IT industry has been at the forefront in terms of job growth in the U.S. post-recession. In fact, between 2003 and 2012, the number of IT jobs increased by 13 percent in the U.S. Big data can help employers survey the competition by pinpointing specific locations across the country in which IT professionals are concentrated, Presley said.

The 411 on Finance

Similarly, selecting the “Finance and Insurance” tab breaks it down by the following sub-categories:

  • Monetary authorities – Central Bank.
  • Depository credit intermediation.
  • Nondepository credit intermediation.
  • Securities and commodity contracts intermediation and brokerage.
  • Securities and commodity exchanges.
  • Other financial investment activities.
  • Insurance carriers.
  • Agencies, brokerages, and other insurance-related activities.
  • Insurance and employee benefit funds.
  • Other investment pools and funds.

Selecting the “agencies, brokerages and other insurance-related activities” sub-category, for instance, reveals the highest density of jobs in Kansas City, St. Louis and Louisville. Meanwhile, the highest percentage job growth since 2010 occurred in St. Louis, Sarasota and Des Moines.

Kevin Knapp, CareerBuilder’s chief financial officer, said: “As employers in the financial industry look to expand their business, big data tools can offer unique insights as to what parts of the country they should be recruiting from.”

So go on, it’s OK to be click happy. And long live big data.

Top 10 Metro Areas with the Most Job Growth Per Capita

September 9th, 2013 Comments off

New research from CareerBuilder and Economic Modeling Specialists Intl.(EMSI) reveals which metros have added the most jobs per capita post-recession.

Metro areas in Texas, California and Utah dominate the list, with growth ranging from 8 to 12 percent since 2010. See the full list below:

Metropolitan Statistical Area Name Jobs added since 2010 % Increase # new jobs per 10,000 people
Salt Lake City, UT 62,000 9% 534
Grand Rapids-Wyoming, MI 39,000 10% 513
San Jose-Sunnyvale-Santa Clara, CA 91,000 10% 498
Austin-Round Rock- San Marcos, TX 90,000 11% 488
Houston-Sugar Land-Baytown, TX 281,000 10% 451
Nashville-Davidson-Murfreesboro-Franklin, TN 71,000 9% 432
Provo-Orem, UT 24,000 12% 427
Dallas-Fort Worth-Arlington, TX 267,000 9% 400
Bakersfield-Delano, CA 33,000 11% 394
Charlotte-Gastonia-Rock Hill, NC-SC 70,000 8% 381

For those who want to dig even deeper into these findings, EMSI has also released an interactive map of the industries that are driving job growth for the 100 most populous U.S. metros. Check it out here.

The Importance of Understanding Job Growth

These findings provide a look at where demand for specific talent will be highest in the coming years. As someone in the recruitment or talent acquisition space, understanding industry trends is imperative to staying ahead of the game and preparing yourself to face the challenges that lie ahead.

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Which Industries And Cities Are Driving Job Growth? An Interactive Map

September 5th, 2013 Comments off

These top 10 metros are driving increased employment.

So what if geography isn’t your strong suit? You may not be able to pinpoint Monte Carlo or Papa New Guinea on a map, but now with a click of a finger you can unlock data on job growth and labor trends in some of the most populous metros in the U.S.

Whether you’re looking to crunch and present numbers to your C-suite or just looking for tidbits that would make great dinner party conversation starters, be sure to check out this comprehensive, interactive map by CareerBuilder and Economic Modeling Specialists Intl. (EMSI). It pulls data from EMSI’s labor market database of more than 90 national and state employment resources.

Digging into the Map

Hovering over a particular U.S. metro on the map can provide an instant snapshot of that metro’s workforce, its percentage job growth increase from 2010 and the average earnings per job.

For example, if you select the Chicago-Joliet-Naperville region in Illinois, you’ll notice the number of jobs are in excess of 4.6 million; there has been a 4 percent growth rate since 2010; and the average earnings per job in the area is nearly $65,000.

If you wanted to drill down more specifically into a particular industry to see where it’s thriving, clicking on the industry menu will pull up a list of U.S. metros in which the industry is a key economic driver.

Let’s take legal services, which falls under the umbrella of “professional, scientific and technical services,” for example. We can see that the geographic location with the greatest number of such jobs is in the New York-Northern New Jersey-Long Island area, where there are nearly 150,000 legal services jobs with an average earning of about $121,000.

Top 10 Metros for Job Growth

According to a different study targeting the same 100 metros, also by CareerBuilder and EMSI, here are the top 10 metros that have added the most jobs per capita since 2010. (Drumroll, please…)

  1. Salt Lake City, UT. Industries such as electronic shopping and mail order houses have helped with the 62,000-plus jobs added since 2010. That’s a 9 percent increase.
  2. Grand Rapids-Wyoming, MI. Manufacturing — especially in segments such as plastics product and motor vehicle parts — continue to play a role in adding the 39,000-plus jobs here since 2010, a 10 percent increase.
  3. San Jose-Sunnyvale-Santa Clara, CA. Software publishing and computer systems design have helped contribute to the 91,000-plus jobs since 2010, which is a 10 percent increase. Surprise, surprise!
  4. Austin-Round Rock- San Marcos, TX. More than 90,000 jobs have been added since 2010, up 11 percent, with areas of job growth particularly evident in the technology and business arenas.
  5. Houston-Sugar Land-Baytown, TX. This metro invests its “energy” (pun intended) in creating jobs in areas such as utility system construction and mining support. These have helped contribute to the 281,000-plus jobs since 2010, a 10 percent jump.
  6. Nashville-Davidson-Murfreesboro-Franklin, TN. Aside from the predictable job growth in the music industry, which experienced a 25 percent increase in jobs, there was a rise in employment in other industries such as motor vehicle manufacturing and accounting services as well. Overall, this metro added more than 71,000 jobs since 2010, a 9 percent increase.
  7. Provo-Orem, UT. The tech sector — in particular software publishing and computer systems design — is driving employment growth in this metro. Since 2010 it has added 24,000-plus jobs, a 12 percent increase.
  8. Dallas-Fort Worth-Arlington, TX. This metro experienced job growth in areas ranging from computer systems design to oil and gas extraction to office administration. It added more than 267,000 jobs since 2010, a 9 percent increase.
  9. Bakersfield-Delano, CA. Agriculture-related industries in particular have helped contribute to the 33,000-plus jobs in this metro, an 11 percent increase since 2010.
  10. Charlotte-Gastonia-Rock Hill, NC-SC. Spectator sports as well as tech-related industries have helped add the more than 70,000 jobs here since 2010, an 8 percent increase.

Hot Jobs, Which Cities?

We challenge you to take this quiz to see if you can guess where in the U.S. some of these key industries are thriving. So grab a pen and notepad, and no cheating, please!

  • Where are jobs for manufacturing of motor vehicle parts beginning to emerge?
  • Which areas are becoming drivers of job growth in the oil and gas extraction space?
  • Where is general freight trucking booming?
  • What about software publishing? (Hint: It’s not just in Silicon Valley anymore.)
  • Think of a few cities where general medical and surgical hospitals jobs are on the upswing.
  • These cities are driving jobs in highway, street and bridge construction as some work to rebuild following natural disasters.

Check your answers against this list.

Tell us: Did you consider any of these findings to be particularly surprising? How can you use this data in your job?

Manufacturing Is On Fire, But a Skills Gap Is Watering Things Down

August 30th, 2013 Comments off

U.S. manufacturing is growing by leaps and bounds.Manufacturing in the U.S. was impressive in July. The Institute for Supply Management index for production was at a nine-year high, showing strong growth in manufacturing output. With such increased production, the sector will have to increase hiring – but this may prove difficult for some positions thanks to a skills gap.

A recent report from the Boston Consulting Group shows that skill shortages in manufacturing are not as pervasive as some may think. Still, shortages exist for some types of manufacturing jobs – welders, for example. While welding does not require an advanced degree, it is a potentially dangerous activity that requires proper training to be performed safely and to quality standards.

Thanks to CareerBuilder’s Supply & Demand Portal, we can examine how hard it is to recruit welders. The hiring indicator, at 54, indicates that welders are moderately hard to recruit nationwide. Over the past two years, it has been easier to recruit for welders than for 54 percent of all other occupations.

CareerBuilder's Supply & Deman Portal shows how hard it is to recruit welders.

If you’re looking for real-time access to labor market trends – including the availability of active candidates for any position as well as locations where you will find the most and least competition is for that talent – you may want to learn more about CareerBuilder’s Supply & Demand Portal (VIDEO.)

However, the situation is not uniform across the U.S. If you were to look at large cities, Chicago and Atlanta are among the best to recruit talent since there are relatively more welders per job opening. In contrast, the search for talent in the welding industry is harder in places such as Charlotte or Orlando, where there are about the same number of job openings for welders as in Chicago, but less than half the available talent.

If manufacturing in the U.S. continues to grow at a strong pace, the skills gap will likely become more pronounced. As great as stronger job growth is, employers will have more trouble filling some of their positions. If this is the case, it may be worthwhile to consider options such as higher pay and better training for new recruits.

Computer and IT Degrees are on the Decline: Should We Worry?

August 1st, 2013 Comments off

Why we're seeing fewer computer and IT degrees now than a decade ago, even though the demand for these workers has increased.

Supply is sometimes higher than demand – take Kardashian family photo ops or Heinz EZ Squirt (RIP), for example. Often, however, demand is higher than supply — as new research from CareerBuilder and Economic Modeling Specialists reveals. Believe it or not, though demand for graduates with computer and IT skills continues to rise, U.S. colleges and universities are producing fewer of these graduates than they did a decade ago.

The CareerBuilder and EMSI research, pulled from EMSI’s labor market and education database, shows that on a national scale, the number of computer and IT jobs in the U.S. grew 13 percent from 2003 to 2012. The number of computer and IT degrees completed in the U.S., however, declined 11 percent during that same period. The drop in tech-related completions was especially stark in some of the largest metropolitan areas, where one would expect them to be higher because of the prevalence of tech jobs in many of those areas.

Matt Ferguson has a clue as to why we’re seeing this trend – and why it’s concerning for today’s employers:

“The slowdown in IT degrees over the last decade may have been influenced, in part, by the dot-com bubble collapse and by more recent trends of tech workers being trained by employers or trained through informal programs outside of a traditional academic setting. The deficit in IT degree completions is concerning when you consider that there is already a considerable gap between the demand for and supply of IT labor in the U.S. today. Degrees in health professions, engineering, business, liberal arts and education are growing rapidly and we need IT degrees to keep pace.”

 

Some other industries are currently off the charts when it comes to the percentage of students earning them, particularly when compared to computer and IT degrees:

  • Health degrees climbed 112 percent from 2003 to 2012 (most in nursing and allied health fields).
  • Liberal arts and humanities degrees increased 47 percent, followed by engineering (37 percent).
  • Business, management and marketing followed at 33 percent.
  • Education climbed 18 percent.

The Computer and IT Degree Decline, at a Glance:

  • There were 13,576 fewer computer and IT degrees in 2012 than 2003: an 11 percent decrease.
  • Related jobs in the U.S. have increased 13.1 percent from 2003-2012 — equating to the addition of 311,068 jobs.
  • Of the 15 metro areas with the most computer and IT degrees in 2012, 10 saw decreases from their 2003 totals.
  • The biggest decreases in computer and IT graduates among the largest metros included New York City (a 52 percent drop), San Francisco (55 percent), Atlanta (33 percent), Miami (32 percent), and Los Angeles (31 percent).
  • Notable metro areas that increased their computer and IT higher education output were Washington, D.C. (a 31 percent rise), Minneapolis-St. Paul (14 percent), and Salt Lake City (117 percent).

A Look at How Other Industries are Faring

  • Health Professions: 288,194 more degrees in 2012 than 2003, a 112 percent increase.
  • Engineering: 37,138 more degrees in 2012 than 2003, a 37 percent increase.
  • Education: 52,391 more degrees in 2012 than 2003, an 18 percent increase.
  • Business, Management and Marketing: 176,972 more degrees in 2012 than 2003, a 33 percent increase.
  • Liberal Arts and Humanities: 124,681 more degrees in 2012 than 2003, a 47 percent increase.

Get all the details on the fastest and slowest-growing industries and a look at the breakdown by metro area.

Temporary Job Growth Has Outpaced Every Other Industry

July 15th, 2013 Comments off

Talent Factor: Temporary Job GrowthSince 2009, the U.S. has added over 5.7 million jobs. According to new data from EMSI, 15 percent of those jobs were in the temporary help services industry, making it the fastest-growing industry since the recession. The finding is even more remarkable, considering the industry makes up a mere 2 percent of the nation’s workforce.

Temporary Job Growth by Metro Area

When looking at individual metropolitan areas, the share of job growth is even larger. In Cincinnati, temp employment accounts for more than 65 percent of new jobs added, followed by 51 percent in Milwaukee, 46 percent in Kansas City and 40 percent in Chicago and Philadelphia.

Ironically, the metropolitan areas that have performed best since the recession – such as Houston, Washington, D.C. and San Jose – saw the least amount of job growth in temporary help services.

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Why a Lack of Sales Training is Hurting Your Company–and What to Do About It

June 24th, 2013 Comments off

Why a lack of formal training at your company is hurting your financial growthThirty-five percent of employers say their companies have missed revenue goals in the last 12 months.

While it’s true a struggling economy has contributed to stunted financial growth, new CareerBuilder research finds that a lack of formal training in sales — a key area of business — may also be a culprit. Sales is a major growth engine not only for business, but also for the overall economy; yet the number of colleges offering a formal sales degree is much lower than those offering other majors with significantly fewer job opportunities tied to them.

Sales degrees are hard to come by — but much-needed 

Data from Economic Modeling Specialists, a CareerBuilder company, shows that twice as many colleges and universities are offering geology degrees (559) as are offering sales degrees (274). There are around six times more schools currently offering psychology degrees (1,571) than sales degrees.

When it comes to actual employment, though, sales-related fields account for 15,517,185 U.S. jobs compared to just 167,728 in psychology-related fields (a 93:1 sales to psychology ratio) and 94,696 in geology-related fields (164:1 sales to geology). The last year alone saw 678,968 job openings in sales-related fields, compared to 8,698 jobs in psychology-related fields and 6,766 job openings in geology-related fields.

What exactly does this mean?

As Brent Rasmussen, president of CareerBuilder North America, explains:

“There is a disconnect between the demand for sales skills in corporate America and the formal training available either through academic institutions or within companies themselves.  On top of this, sales training budgets are not as robust as they should be, with a large percentage of sales leaders reporting their companies spend $10,000 or less on sales training in a given year.

If companies want to see better top-line growth, there has to be a greater investment in educating sales teams on critical skills on an ongoing basis.”

In separate research conducted by CareerBuilder and Harris Interactive©, sales leaders voiced concerns over their sales training programs and candidate readiness. The research found:

  • 1 in 6 sales managers in firms that have missed revenue goals in the last year cited a lack of sales training as a cause.
  • 55 percent of sales leaders said their companies spend $10,000 or less on sales training annually.
  • Of sales leaders who offer formal sales training to their staff, 64 percent said that training at their firms is only somewhat effective.
  • 50 percent of sales leaders said candidates for entry-level sales jobs are only somewhat prepared or not prepared at all.

Bridging the sales training gap

CareerBuilder and Indiana University’s Kelley School of Business have joined forces to create a comprehensive, cloud-based solution for corporate career training and development. Moneyball™ for Sales is a first-of-its-kind solution for sales training that is designed to capture a salesperson’s traits and perceived abilities.

Through a detailed assessment program, Moneyball™ helps sales representatives and their leaders identify the strengths and weaknesses of individual team members to generate a customized development plan for each salesperson.

Moneyball™ is working to bring down the immense cost of sales turnover and remedy the fact that, although an estimated 50 percent of college graduates start their career in sales, very few of those graduates have any sales training when they enter the workplace and, as a result, fail during their first year on the job.

In Rasmussen’s words:

“Working with the Kelley School of Business, we’re bringing together leaders in education and human capital management to help address a training issue that has plagued sales organizations and has greater economic implications.”

Read the full press release and find out more about how sales training impacts your bottom line here.

 

Housing Market Has Influenced Creation of Over 200,000 Jobs

June 17th, 2013 Comments off

talent statisticsThanks to a recovering job market, the U.S. housing market is enjoying a resurgence, which in turn is leading to even more job creation. A new study from CareerBuilder and Economic Modeling Specialists Intl. (EMSI) indicates that as home prices and sales begin to inch up again, several industry segments tied to the housing sector have experienced encouraging job growth over the last 12 to 18 months.

Since 2011, the U.S. has added more than 187,000 construction jobs (a 2 percent increase), and more than 59,000 additional housing supply chain jobs (an increase of 3 percent).

Among the specific segments within the housing supply chain with an upward trajectory for job creation from 2011 to 2013, the top five are mortgage and nonmortgage loan brokers; home centers and other home furnishing stores; building materials dealers; hardware, paint and wallpaper stores; and upholstered household furniture manufacturing.

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Is the Housing Market Recovery Building New Jobs?

June 17th, 2013 Comments off

Warren Buffett’s vote of confidence isn’t the only indication the housing market is improving; the fact that more people are gainfully employed in the U.S. today has helped to give the housing market a much-needed boost. Can we also say the opposite is true — that the housing recovery in turn has helped employment? CareerBuilder and Economic Modeling Specialists Intl. explored this question in depth in a new study tracking labor trends in the U.S. The study used EMSI’s vast labor market database, which pulls from more than 90 national and state employment resources and includes detailed information on employees and self-employed workers, to find the answer.

Matt Ferguson, CEO of CareerBuilder, sees a positive correlation between a housing market recovery and job growth. “Several industry segments closely tied to the housing sector have experienced encouraging job growth over the last 12 to 18 months as home prices and sales inch up, and the economy improves. While some segments may still be trailing pre-recession employment levels and may not fully recover jobs lost, we’re seeing signs of a rebound in everything from construction and mortgage banking to home furnishing stores.”

Housing-Related Employment Growth

It’s clear from many of the job growth examples below that as the housing market heals, more and more jobs to support that growth are popping up. Take a look:

Construction:

  • EMSI’s study found that the construction industry is building up its headcount again after experiencing heavy job losses during the recession.
  • Since 2011, the U.S. has added more than 187,000 construction jobs, an increase of 2 percent.
  • 7,794,077 people are currently employed in this segment.

Outside of construction:

  • Housing-related industries outside of construction have also produced a steady stream of new jobs.
  • Since 2011, the U.S. has created more than 59,000 additional housing supply chain jobs, an increase of 3 percent.
  • 1,755,863 people are currently employed in this segment.

 

Looking at a sample of specific segments within the housing supply chain, there has been an upward trajectory for job creation from 2011 to 2013:

Mortgage and Non-Mortgage Loan Brokers

  • Added 19,317 jobs since 2011; 30 percent growth.
  • 84,759 people currently employed.

Home Centers and Other Home Furnishing Stores

  • Added 23,849 jobs since 2011, 3 percent growth.
  • 823,496 people currently employed.

Building Materials Dealers

  • Added 11,305 jobs since 2011, 4 percent growth.
  • 317,987 people currently employed.

Hardware, Paint and Wallpaper Stores

  • Added 4,062 jobs since 2011, 2 percent growth.
  • 184,017 people currently employed.

 

Metropolitan city housing & job trends

In metropolitan areas showing notable increases in both home values and housing market activity, we’re also seeing significant job growth.

Los Angeles

  • Added 191,343 total jobs since 2011, 3 percent growth.
  • Added 22,318 construction jobs, 8 percent growth
  • Added 3,138 other housing supply chain jobs, 5 percent growth.

Denver

  • Added 69,622 total jobs since 2011, 5 percent growth.
  • Added 6,243 construction jobs, 8 percent growth.
  • Added 904 other housing supply chain jobs, 6 percent growth.

San Francisco

  • Added 118,617 total jobs since 2011, 5 percent growth.
  • Added 13,963 construction jobs, 13 percent growth.
  • Added 465 other housing supply chain jobs, 2 percent growth.

 

See the full study, including more examples of housing-related employment growth and growth in cities like Phoenix and Denver, here.

About EMSI

Economic Modeling Specialists Intl. is a CareerBuilder company that provides industry-leading employment data and economic analysis via web tools and custom reports. EMSI turns vast amounts of labor market data into easy-to-use information that helps organizations understand the connection between economies, people, and work, and ultimately build a better workforce.

When it Comes to Hiring, Houston’s Showing Everyone Up

June 14th, 2013 Comments off

Houston is not only the top U.S. city for job creation, but it's also proving to be an easy place to recruit candidates.

By Ioana Marinescu

Turns out Houston, the top U.S. city for job creation, is also a good place to hire!

As the U.S. still struggles to create enough jobs to address the massive unemployment hangover from the Great Recession, Houston is seeing extremely dynamic job growth. The Bureau of Labor Statistics notes that Houston has seen the largest employment growth among top metro areas during the past year. Houston even added a lot more jobs than were lost during the Great Recession.

Using CareerBuilder’s Supply & Demand Portal, we can analyze which industries and job titles were at the forefront of job creation in the Houston area this past year.

A graph of job creation in Houston in the past year by job title

 It’s not just oil and gas anymore

While traditional Houston-based industries around oil and gas have contributed importantly to the job boom, there are also other dynamic industries doing their part; in particular, health care, banking, IT and engineering industries.

In terms of job titles, a graph of top job titles shows that many jobs were created in service roles, at various levels of qualification and hierarchy.

A graph of which industries and job titles were at the forefront of job creation in the Houston area in the past year.

Recruiting opportunities abound

What makes the case of Houston even more interesting is that, despite its amazing performance in terms of job creation, it remains an area where it is relatively easy for companies to recruit (see the CareerBuilder hiring indicator).

CareerBuilder's Hiring Indicator shows that Houston remains an area where it is relatively easy for companies to recruit.

Strong job creation and recruitment opportunities suggest that Houston’s star will continue to shine as America’s most dynamic labor market.

Thoughts?

Ioana MarinescuIoana Marinescu is an assistant professor in economics at the University of Chicago Harris School of Public Policy. Her research focuses on understanding labor markets. She
has been collaborating on data and research projects with CareerBuilder and she is especially interested in how to get the right people to work in the right jobs. You can follow her on twitter @mioana and check out her research on her website, marinescu.eu.

Is the Skills Gap Just a Scapegoat for Employers?

June 6th, 2013 Comments off

BlameEmployersIs it high time for employers to stop being polite and start being real blaming a skills gap for their hiring struggles? For several months now, companies have been complaining about how they can’t find the right candidates to fill their open positions, blaming a labor market shortage of qualified applicants and skilled talent. Recently, however, some economists have started to argue that employers only have themselves to blame for their problems.

In a recent New York Times article, NPR’s Adam Davidson says what employers are calling a skills gap is really a wage gap. Simply put: the skilled workers employers want are out there; however, employers aren’t offering compensation that is compelling enough to drive workers to apply. As a result, candidates are passing them over for opportunities in industries that pay better. And can you blame them? As Forbes’ Maureen Henderson points out, a registered nurse may have plenty of career opportunities, but he or she could make more money working in retail than changing bedpans.

Pointing to a recent finding that 10 percent increase in compensation leads to a 7 percent increase in applicants, University of Chicago economist Ioana Marinescu suggests that employers need to reconsider their compensation offering and make an effort to understand what constitutes a truly competitive compensation.

If these economists are right – and employers bridge this “skills gap” by offering more money – then why aren’t more employers doing it?

Granted, increasing your compensation offering by 10 percent is nothing to sneeze at; however, when considering how much businesses stand to lose when positions go unfilled or when they hire the wrong people, increasing compensation ultimately might be the more economical choice. (Especially when you consider that it could also be the best way to boost retention.)

What’s your take on this debate? Do you believe companies could meet their hiring needs by offering more competitive compensation? (And could part of the problem be that employers do not know what is considered “competitive”?)

The Skills Gap Heard ‘Round the World

March 20th, 2013 Comments off

Infographic_GlobalSkillsGapCompanies in the top ten world economies report losses in productivity and revenue due to a skills gap, survey finds.

Think you’ve got it bad trying to find skilled labor? You should see the other guys.

According to CareerBuilder’s most recent survey, the U.S. isn’t the only country that’s feeling the hurt of a skills gap – far from it, in fact. Of the countries with the largest gross domestic product, China seems to be suffering the most from vacant positions, where 81 percent of employers in China say they have open positions they cannot fill.

With 38 percent of its employers reporting long vacant open positions, the U.S. seems to be the country suffering the least from a skills gap. (So…good for us?) Brazil, Russia, India and Italy round out the top five countries suffering the effects of job vacancies.

“The study underlines how critical it is for the government, private sector and educational institutions to work together to prepare and reskill workers for opportunities that can help move the needle on employment and economic growth,” according to CareerBuilder CEO Matt Ferguson, in statement for the press release.

More than 6,000 hiring managers and human resource professionals in countries with the largest gross domestic product participated in the survey. In addition to looking at how many companies worldwide have positions they can’t fill, the survey also examined negative effects of such vacancies, and which industries were most in need of labor.

Survey highlights are below (or see the infographic here).

Percentage of companies with open positions they can’t fill

  • China – 74 percent
  • Brazil – 63 percent
  • Russia – 57 percent
  • India – 53 percent
  • Germany – 31 percent
  • Japan – 29 percent
  • U.S. – 28 percent
  • France – 26 percent
  • U.K – 23 percent
  • Italy – 18 percent

Negative Impact of Unfilled Positions

The following numbers indicate the percentage of employers – by country – who have experienced negative implications from extended job vacancies, citing less effective business performance, lower quality work, lower morale and higher employee turnover.

  • China – 81 percent
  • Brazil – 74 percent
  • Russia – 74 percent
  • India – 69 percent
  • Italy – 55 percent
  • France – 47 percent
  • U.K. – 41 percent
  • Japan – 40 percent
  • Germany – 39 percent
  • U.S. – 38 percent

Of employers who have felt a detrimental impact from extended vacancies, the following reported suffering a loss in productivity and revenue and stagnant business growth.

Loss of Productivity

  • China – 65 percent
  • U.S. – 41 percent
  • Russia – 40 percent
  • Brazil – 39 percent
  • U.K. – 33 percent
  • India – 32 percent
  • Germany – 31 percent
  • Italy – 31 percent
  • Japan – 30 percent
  • France – 21 percent 

Loss of Revenue

  • Russia – 29 percent
  • China – 26 percent
  • Japan – 26 percent
  • Germany – 24 percent
  • India – 22 percent
  • U.S. – 21 percent
  • Italy – 19 percent
  • France – 17 percent
  • U.K. – 16 percent
  • Brazil – 15 percent

Inability to Grow Their Business

  • China – 33 percent
  • Japan – 25 percent
  • France – 24 percent
  • U.S. – 22 percent
  • U.K. – 22 percent
  • India – 21 percent
  • Germany – 21 percent
  • Italy – 21 percent
  • Russia – 20 percent
  • Brazil – 19 percent

Hardest to Fill Industries

It should come as no surprise that filling positions in technical fields like Information Technology and Engineering – pose the biggest challenge for employers across the globe. Below is a breakdown of the hardest to fill industries by country.

  • U.S. – IT, Sales and Engineering
  • U.K. – Engineering, IT and Customer Service
  • France – Production, Sales and Customer Service
  • Germany – IT, Engineering and Sales
  • Italy – Production, Creative/Design and Sales
  • Russia – Engineering, Production and IT
  • India – Research & Development, IT and Marketing
  • China – Research & Development, Creative/Design and Engineering
  • Japan – Engineering, IT and Research & Development
  • Brazil – IT, Production and Customer Service

View the Global Skills Gap Infographic. 

More Women than Men Want to Learn New Skills Outside Their Current Position Scope

February 18th, 2013 Comments off

According to the BLS’ new databook on women in the labor force, women have made significant progress in the areas of educational achievement and earnings over the last 40 years. Labor force participation is significantly higher among women today than it was in the 1970s, but it seems to have peaked at 60 percent in 1999. By 2011, only 58.1 percent of women were in the labor force, down .5 percentage point from 2010.

While there are a wide variety of reasons women may be exiting the workforce, the economic benefits to promote female employment are pretty clear. According to the recent paper from Booz & Company, Empowering the Third Billion: Women and the World of Work in 2012, “if female employment rates were to match male rates in the United States, overall GDP would increase by 5 percent.” 

Employers can help to stop this decline by stepping up their efforts to recruit women – and that means understanding how women search for jobs and what they look for in potential employers.

Recent CareerBuilder research shows females are more willing to learn new skills outside of the scope of their current position (68% vs. 63% of men). Attracting more female workers could be as easy as highlighting your organization’s training and re-skilling programs. This finding also indicates an opportunity for employers to retain current employees by providing more training and development opportunities for their current workers.

Additional tips for attracting and retaining female workers include:

  • Implement practices that reduce conflicts between work and family demands (i.e. promote flexible work schedules, provide access to daycare, promote a Results-Only Work Environment, etc.).
  • Change the way jobs are structured/described and roles/behaviors enacted to make them gender neutral. Jobs should de-emphasize masculine and feminine stereotypical attributes. Application and hiring information should be gender neutral.
  • Make it easier for women to work in male-dominated companies/industries by adapting working styles to allow women (and men) to accommodate family demands.

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Working, Girl? The Economic Impact of Women in the Workforce

February 8th, 2013 Comments off

LA Premiere Of Newline's "Fracture" - ArrivalsAs the number of women in the workforce declines, employers can and should work to reverse the trend.

So here’s the good news: According to the BLS’ new databook on women in the labor force, women have made significant progress in the areas of educational achievement and earnings over the last 40 years. Take, for example, the following findings:

  • From 1970 to 2011, the percentage of women with college degrees increased from 11 to 37, while the percentage of women who didn’t graduate high school decreased from 34 to 7.
  • In 1979, women working full time earned 62 percent of what men did; by 2011, the pay gap was much smaller, with women’s earnings making up 82 percent of men’s.

But here comes the not-so-great news (aside from the fact that there’s still much progress to be made): While labor force participation is significantly higher among women today than it was in the 1970s, it seems to have peaked at 60 percent in 1999. By 2011, only 58.1 percent of women were in the labor force, and that was down .5 percentage point from 2010.

If the trend continues, it doesn’t bode well for the future of the economy.

Two recent papers examining the impact of women in the workforce point to the vast importance of sustaining the growth of female workers. According to the recent paper from Booz & Company, Empowering the Third Billion: Women and the World of Work in 2012, “if female employment rates were to match male rates in the United States, overall GDP would increase by 5 percent.”

Conversely, if female employment rate continue to decline, the impact on the economy could be grim, according to a 2012 whitepaper by economists James Stock and Mark Watson. The authors assert that the decline of women’s participation in the workforce would contribute considerably to slower GDP growth and deeper recessions, followed by slower periods of recovery.

But the good news (again) is that employers can help to stop this decline by stepping up their efforts to recruit women – and that means understanding how women search for jobs and what they look for in potential employers.

A recent whitepaper from  management professors Matthew Bidwell and Roxana Barbulescu, which examines the factors that play into why women choose different jobs from men, offers insight into how employers can improve the way they recruit women. Forbes’ Lisa Quast sums it up well with the following tips:

  • Implement practices that reduce conflicts between work and family demands (i.e. promote flexible work schedules, provide access to daycare, promote a Results-Only Work Environment, etc.).
  • Change the way jobs are structured/described and roles/behaviors enacted to make them gender neutral. Jobs should de-emphasize masculine and feminine stereotypical attributes. Application and hiring information should be gender neutral.
  • Make it easier for women to work in male-dominated companies/industries by adapting working styles to allow women (and men) to accommodate family demands.

Returnships: Internships for a New Generation

January 17th, 2013 Comments off

ReturnshipsNeed Skilled Workers? Consider a Returnship Program

It’s a common story these days: companies can’t find the qualified candidates they need, despite the high unemployment rate. But some employers are solving this dilemma through what are known as returnship programs.

Returnships, or return-to-work programs, are commonly described as internship programs for older professionals who have been out of the workforce for an extended period of time. In many cases, they are designed to help these individuals refresh their skill sets, learn new technologies and ease back into the corporate world.

“This is such a great program to invest in,” says Beverly Flaxington, co-founder of The Collaborative, a Massachusetts-based business development consulting firm, who believes returnship programs create a huge opportunity for employers to find the skilled workers they need to fill crucial roles.

“There are a tremendous amount of talented individuals out in the market who may have been out of the day-to-day working environment for a while, but that doesn’t diminish fact they have fundamental skills to do the job or be successful,” Flaxington says.

While Goldman Sachs may have started the trend (the company coined the phrase in 2008), returnship programs are growing increasingly common among companies of all sizes and industries, and have proven to be a win-win for both employers and participants. For individual workers, they provide the chance to prove themselves as valuable, productive employees. Companies benefit from the opportunity to take on workers with years of professional experience behind them and “test-drive” them before hiring them full-time.

Getting the Most Out of a Returnship: Five Tips

For companies who want to benefit from returnship programs at their own organizations, Flaxington provides the following advice:

  • Get out of your own way: Employers need to let go of preconceived notions about people who have been out of the workforce, Flaxington says: “You can’t make a blanket statement like, ‘Everyone who’s been out of workforce is out of touch with new technology.’ Some of the most tech-savvy people are in their 60’s.” For this reason, employers need to…
  • Assess and customize to the individual worker: Flaxington recommends creating individual assessments to understand which areas a particular worker may need the most training and guidance. “Employers need to give the person a chance to say ‘here’s where I need help’ and create a process that’s a little more targeted to the individual’s needs, giving them an opportunity to develop skills in certain areas – and providing them training where they need it.”
  • Understand where there’s going to be a learning curve: These workers have the skills they need to succeed, but they might be a bit “rusty” when it comes to actually being in a corporate environment.  And that rustiness can take a toll on one’s confidence. One way to combat this challenge, however, is to assign workers a mentor who can guide them as to what it takes to succeed at the organization. “That’s going to go a long way in their ability to get up to speed quickly and contribute to their full potential.” Another solution might be to…
  • Reevaluate the classic onboarding process: Go beyond simply showing these workers the classic organizational structure and give them more intelligence about how the company works from a cultural standpoint. “The onboarding process is where employers have a chance to be more proactive and more conscious about giving them the lay of the land and helping them navigate the workforce culture,” Flaxington says. Finally…
  • Be willing to take a risk: Employers may be wary of candidates who have been out of the workforce for a significant time period, but they would be doing themselves a disservice by counting this group out entirely. “These individuals provide a pool of resources that companies aren’t taking advantage of,” Flaxington says. “Companies tend to make the mistake of looking at the job they’re trying to fill and trying to match the skill sets clearly. These candidates may not be a perfect match on paper, but they probably have the work style, cultural fit and soft skills you’re looking for.”

Is a returnship something you would consider providing at your own organization?

CareerBuilder’s First Global Job Forecast Is Here: 10 Top Economies Report

January 16th, 2013 Comments off

CareerBuilder Global Job Forecast 2013We have a pretty good idea by now of what businesses across the U.S. are planning when it comes to hiring, finances and compensation in 2013 — but what does growth look like for economies around the world?

CareerBuilder’s first-ever annual job forecast of the 10 largest world economies answers this question for us and reveals that while some countries, like Brazil and India, are confident about the year ahead (more than two-thirds of employers in these markets planning to add full-time, permanent headcount in 2013), others, like Italy, appear to be more guarded (more employers expect to decrease staff than those who expect to hire). The survey, conducted by Harris Interactive©, included more than 6,000 hiring managers in countries with the largest gross domestic product.

Current financial standings across the world

BRIC’s ambitious hiring plans for 2013

Emerging economies are the most aggressive in terms of hiring plans for this year, despite a slowing in economic expansion, and Brazil, China, India and Russia are at the top of the list:

  1. Brazil: Brazil houses the largest percentage of employers adding headcount (71 percent), in part influenced by plans to host the upcoming World Cup and Summer Olympics and in part by a better-performing manufacturing sector.
  2. China and India: Although impacted by weakened trade and market demand, China’s and India’s GDP have grown at a rate that far outstrips the rest of the world’s major economies. More than half of employers in China and two-thirds in India plan to hire in 2013.
  3. Russia: Russia has hit record low unemployment and still benefits from metals and energy exports despite a fall off in demand in China and Europe. There is also a more aggressive push for high tech investments. Nearly half of Russian employers plan to add jobs.

Europe cautious amid recession

As European nations continue to battle another recession, many of them have plans to downsize or otherwise cut costs in 2013:

  • Italy: 33 percent of Italian employers expect to downsize staffs, the highest of the top 10 economies.
  • France: Hiring activity in France is expected to be flat, with nearly one in four employers planning to add or decrease headcount.
  • UK.: While 30 percent of U.K. employers plan to hire, 21 percent are anticipating a decline for a net increase of only 9 percent adding jobs.
  • Germany: Germany, which has been somewhat insulated from the crisis but not immune, is more optimistic with nearly three in 10 employers planning to hire and 15 percent expecting a decline.

U.S. starting to see daylight

Concerns over the fiscal cliff at the time of the survey may have resulted in more conservative predictions, but hiring activity has been on a gradual upward trajectory. Twenty-six percent of U.S. employers will add new jobs this year.

Japan getting back on its feet

Rounding out the top economies, Japan continues to work to rebuild business investment and consumer spending after a devastating tsunami in 2011. While 22 percent of employers in Japan plan to increase staff, 19 percent expect to downsize.

Regarding the large range of growth prospects and hiring plans in these 10 economies, CareerBuilder CEO Matt Ferguson notes: “The job outlook presents varying degrees of growth and deceleration as governments and businesses strive to rebuild and expand and deal with large deficits. Hiring activity in the BRIC countries (Brazil, Russia, India and China) is projected to be significantly higher than other markets, while recruitment in Europe remains sluggish as leaders struggle to resolve a debt crisis that has global implications.”

Top jobs for the New Year

Across major markets, employers are most likely to hire for positions closely tied to revenue and innovation.

Hiring in the following areas emerged as major areas of hiring across the board:

  • Sales
  • Customer service
  • Information technology
  • Production

Get the full CareerBuilder global job forecast, including the top market areas for hiring broken down by individual economies, percentage of employers who plan to hire in each region, and more.

Read the full Forecast Now

 

Giving Back: CareerBuilder’s Re-Employment Inititative [Video]

October 10th, 2012 Comments off

Several months after embarking on an ambitious effort to address the nation’s skills gap, CareerBuilder reflects on the results of the program. (Video below.)

Earlier this year, as part of its Empowering Employment initiative, CareerBuilder created a six-month training program to address the question, “Where are all the qualified workers?” From January to June of this year, CareerBuilder provided a free, comprehensive training program for a select group of individuals, in efforts to prepare them for work in the information technology industry (where the demand for skilled workers heavily outweighs the supply).

“Ultimately, we’re hoping to create a model businesses can replicate and use to bridge the skills gap at their own organizations and across the country,” Rosemary Haefner, Vice President of Human Resources at CareerBuilder, said last March, when the project was three-months underway.

Looking back now, Haefner says the company benefited from the program just as much as the interns did. “In the end, the program was not just about teaching new skills to the interns,” she says. “The CareerBuilder employees who acted as mentors learned just as much about themselves – whether it was gaining insight into their own teaching abilities or finding a new appreciation for the tools and training they have at their disposal each and every day.”

Haefner says those who participated also found that, of the three elements that made up the program – classroom training, mentoring with CareerBuilder employees and project work – the hands-on project work had the biggest impact on the interns’ ability to master these skills, which in turn helped build their confidence.

As for that initial goal of creating a business model other companies can replicate, Haefner believes they achieved it, saying:

“I’d encourage other companies to consider adding a similar re-skilling program to their organizations. The interns contributed back at a solid level much earlier in the training than we anticipated. If you’re able to structure your program so that there is significant training in the first month, you’ll recoup your investment quickly.”

CareerBuilder’s leadership is so pleased with the results of the program, Haefner says they are already in the planning stages of “version 2.0”, and recently released the following video about the program. Watch as program participants – both interns and CareerBuilder employees – discuss their success stories.

Fourth Quarter Hiring Predictions Closely Mirror Pre-Recession Estimates

October 8th, 2012 Comments off

Last week CareerBuilder released the results of its Q4, 2012 Hiring Forecast, pointing to a more upbeat fourth quarter.  Twenty-six percent of employers plan to add full-time, permanent headcount in the next three months, up five percentage points from 2011 and closely mirroring pre-recession estimates.

“This is the most optimistic fourth quarter projection since 2007,” said Matt Ferguson, CEO of CareerBuilder.  “We’re seeing continued evidence of stability and growth in the U.S. job market.  A dramatic upswing in hiring is not likely to happen in the near term, but we’re setting the stage for better job creation in 2013 and beyond.”

The full results of CareerBuilder’s Q4, 2012 Hiring Forecast are available here.

Companies hiring in Q4 2012

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U.S. Workers Living Paycheck to Paycheck at a Recession-Era Low

August 15th, 2012 Comments off

U.S. workers worried about financesThough if you reach into the typical American person’s pocket, you’re more likely to come up with a handful of chocolate than actual gold (1. I don’t know that that’s actually true, and 2. it’s never a good idea to go reaching into people’s pockets), it turns out fewer American workers are nervously counting down the minutes to their next payday in order to keep the lights on, according to a new CareerBuilder survey among more than 3,800 full-time workers.

How Many Workers are Living Paycheck to Paycheck?

Forty percent of workers report that they always or usually live paycheck to paycheck, a slight decrease from 42 percent who said the same in 2011. This year’s figure marks a recession-era low, continuing what’s been a downward trend since the dawn of the financial crisis in 2008, when 46 percent of Americans said they lived paycheck to paycheck.The survey also found that 53 percent of those currently living paycheck to paycheck weren’t doing so before 2008.

In Addition:

  • 37 percent of workers say they sometimes live paycheck to paycheck
  • 23 percent say they never live paycheck to paycheck.
  • 20 percent of workers were unable to make ends meet at least once in the last year.
  •  12 percent of workers who earn $100,000 or more always or usually live paycheck to paycheck – trending down from 14 percent in 2011 and 17 percent in 2010.

SEE THE INFOGRAPHIC

Owning one’s financial future

Rosemary Haefner, vice president of human resources at CareerBuilder, points out that financial security in spite of a tough economy often comes down to workers’ strategic choices:

“Making ends meet remains a challenge for millions of households, but the situation has improved for workers who’ve grown more confident with their job security or who’ve taken steps to pay down debt and save more. Seventy-two percent of workers report they are more fiscally responsible since the end of the recession, and as the labor market continues to improve, we expect more workers will again be able to spend in ways that will drive the economy forward.”

Never Gonna Give You Up (Internet)
A majority (59 percent) of workers said they cut back on leisure activities since the start of the recession, but for many, Fido and Google are too important to give up, regardless of financial concerns:

• Internet connection – 57 percent
• Driving – 44 percent
• Pet – 39 percent
• Cable TV – 29 percent
• Mobile phone – 24 percent

Workers' Most Valued Expenses

Lonely Piggy Banks?

Twenty-seven percent of workers don’t save a dime from month to month. Thirty percent, however, save more than $250, and 10 percent save more than $1,000.

Long-Term Planning

  • 67 percent of workers contribute to a 401(k), IRA or comparable retirement plan, similar to 2011 (66 percent).
  • 20 percent of workers said they reduced their contribution to these plans in the last year, which is also relatively unchanged from 2011 (21 percent).

Women Versus Men

Consistent with past studies, women (44 percent) are more likely than men (36 percent) to live paycheck to paycheck. The study also found that 25 percent of female workers missed a monthly payment at least once in the past year, compared to 17 percent of men.

With Age Comes… Financial Wisdom?

Compared to other age groups, workers close to retirement (55 and older) are least likely to report living paycheck to paycheck:

• 18-34: 40 percent
• 35-44: 42 percent
• 45-54: 43 percent
• 55 and older: 34 percent

Workers 55 and older are also more likely than those workers age 25-54 to report saving more than $1,000 dollars a month (13 percent), and they’re the most likely age group to participate in a 401(k), IRA or comparable plan (73 percent).

See all the details here with our infographic.

Anything about these results surprise you?

‘Rich History’ of Hiring Veterans Points to Bright Future | Q&A with Humana’s Director of Talent Acquisition

July 17th, 2012 Comments off

Last May, health care company Humana, Inc. pledged to hire 1,000 military veterans and/or their spouses over a three-year period as part of President Obama’s nationwide veterans hiring challenge. Less than a year later, Humana is already ahead of schedule. As of this month, they’re already at 46 percent of their goal.

“Our estimate was to be at approximately 35 percent by this time. We feel good about where we are,” said Kevin Stakelum, Talent Acquisition Director at Humana, in a recent phone interview. Not long after Stakelum, a veteran of the military services himself, began his role at Humana, which already has a rich history of hiring military veterans and their spouses, he was charged with leading this new initiative. Under his supervision, his team works to help educate his fellow veterans about their career options and empower them with the skills and resources they need to create careers in the civilian workforce.

“Whether these veterans use the information and training we provide to take one of the jobs in our company, or whether they decide to take those skills to find jobs in other companies – either outcome is fine with us,” Stakelum says. He recently sat down with us to discuss more about Humana’s hiring initiative and what it means to both military veterans and the companies that hire them. 

How are you reaching out to veterans to recruit them? One of the key platforms of our strategy is the Veterans Talent Network. We decided to create a separate talent network because the message we want to send to veterans is a little different than the one we would send to civilians. They need a different level of information.  A lot of these people do not have experience in the civilian job market.  The Veterans Talent Network has allowed us to put more information in their hands.  Once we had that tool, we then created a strategy around how we were going to get our message out, and how we were actually going to make the hires. We also hired a veteran recruiting specialist to help us determine the right partnerships to form and the right approaches to help us take all the information that’s out there and boil it down just a little bit.

What is your particular involvement in this initiative? I lead the initiative. It was given to me in my first week here at Humana. There were a lot of things we had to start on, so I focused most on the basics. Once we had the basics down, we were  able to start focusing our efforts, reaching out and establishing key partnerships.  Then we were able to start gaining some momentum.  That’s kind of how this whole thing got started.  It’s just not me—I’m only a leader of an initiative, an action team.  The members of this action team were key in helping to guide our activities, make sure what we’re doing makes sense, and that we are continuing to do things that will enable the right things to be done.

When coming out of the Armed Services, did you have an easier time making the transition to the civilian workforce than others? Yes, because I was in the National Guard, so I had a civilian career on the side. The transition process at that time was very different than it is today. The National Guard members today are expected to go overseas for prolonged periods. Back then, it was still a commitment, but our commitment was more around “We’ll be activated if the country goes to war,” whereas it’s a little bit of a different mission now. 

How are you creating awareness throughout Humana with employees who aren’t necessarily directly tied to this initiative? We’re a large company, so there are going to be parts of the company which do not lend themselves to this initiative. That’s okay, because we’ve got plenty of parts of the company that do. The strength of the company is in its careerpathing and in the culture that allows people to grow. Before coming to Humana, I had never been involved in a company that allowed people to move so freely from one part of the company to another. I think that’s another thing that attracts veterans to this company: many veterans just want a chance to show what they can do. We’ve got everything from call center roles, all the way to executive roles. A person can come into a role for which they are qualified, show what they do and be rewarded for it. I think that’s something we are leveraging better than many.  

Has anything surprised you since you began this initiative? The level of support from the company did surprise me. On one hand, you know there’s going to be a lot of support, but the amount of support at all levels has been great to see. And although I had high expectations, I still feel that a differentiating factor here is, we’re not posturing.  There are business leaders and segment leaders who will come to an event to support this initiative. And I don’t mean just show up; they participate. They make the time.  The outpouring of support from people throughout the organization has been incredible to watch. As a new employee, it is bigger than I expected.  We have more people interested in helping than we can sometimes accommodate.

A lot of companies now have veteran hiring initiatives.  What is unique to Humana’s? There is such an incredible abundance of opportunities for people to come into the organization and make a difference in real peoples’ lives on a daily basis.  I think that’s the competitive advantage.

About Humana: Headquartered in Louisville, Kentucky, Humana, Inc. is a leading health care company that offers a wide range of insurance products and health and wellness services that incorporate an integrated approach to lifelong well-being. By leveraging the strengths of its core businesses, Humana believes it can better explore opportunities for existing and emerging adjacencies in health care that can further enhance wellness opportunities for the millions of people across the nation with whom the company has relationships. Learn more at www.humana.com

‘Rich History’ of Hiring Veterans Points to Bright Future | Q&A with Humana’s Director of Talent Acquisition

July 17th, 2012 Comments off

Last May, health care company Humana, Inc. pledged to hire 1,000 military veterans and/or their spouses over a three-year period as part of President Obama’s nationwide veterans hiring challenge. Less than a year later, Humana is already ahead of schedule. As of this month, they’re already at 46 percent of their goal.

“Our estimate was to be at approximately 35 percent by this time. We feel good about where we are,” said Kevin Stakelum, Talent Acquisition Director at Humana, in a recent phone interview. Not long after Stakelum, a veteran of the military services himself, began his role at Humana, which already has a rich history of hiring military veterans and their spouses, he was charged with leading this new initiative. Under his supervision, his team works to help educate his fellow veterans about their career options and empower them with the skills and resources they need to create careers in the civilian workforce.

“Whether these veterans use the information and training we provide to take one of the jobs in our company, or whether they decide to take those skills to find jobs in other companies – either outcome is fine with us,” Stakelum says. He recently sat down with us to discuss more about Humana’s hiring initiative and what it means to both military veterans and the companies that hire them. 

How are you reaching out to veterans to recruit them? One of the key platforms of our strategy is the Veterans Talent Network. We decided to create a separate talent network because the message we want to send to veterans is a little different than the one we would send to civilians. They need a different level of information.  A lot of these people do not have experience in the civilian job market.  The Veterans Talent Network has allowed us to put more information in their hands.  Once we had that tool, we then created a strategy around how we were going to get our message out, and how we were actually going to make the hires. We also hired a veteran recruiting specialist to help us determine the right partnerships to form and the right approaches to help us take all the information that’s out there and boil it down just a little bit.

What is your particular involvement in this initiative? I lead the initiative. It was given to me in my first week here at Humana. There were a lot of things we had to start on, so I focused most on the basics. Once we had the basics down, we were  able to start focusing our efforts, reaching out and establishing key partnerships.  Then we were able to start gaining some momentum.  That’s kind of how this whole thing got started.  It’s just not me—I’m only a leader of an initiative, an action team.  The members of this action team were key in helping to guide our activities, make sure what we’re doing makes sense, and that we are continuing to do things that will enable the right things to be done.

When coming out of the Armed Services, did you have an easier time making the transition to the civilian workforce than others? Yes, because I was in the National Guard, so I had a civilian career on the side. The transition process at that time was very different than it is today. The National Guard members today are expected to go overseas for prolonged periods. Back then, it was still a commitment, but our commitment was more around “We’ll be activated if the country goes to war,” whereas it’s a little bit of a different mission now. 

How are you creating awareness throughout Humana with employees who aren’t necessarily directly tied to this initiative? We’re a large company, so there are going to be parts of the company which do not lend themselves to this initiative. That’s okay, because we’ve got plenty of parts of the company that do. The strength of the company is in its careerpathing and in the culture that allows people to grow. Before coming to Humana, I had never been involved in a company that allowed people to move so freely from one part of the company to another. I think that’s another thing that attracts veterans to this company: many veterans just want a chance to show what they can do. We’ve got everything from call center roles, all the way to executive roles. A person can come into a role for which they are qualified, show what they do and be rewarded for it. I think that’s something we are leveraging better than many.  

Has anything surprised you since you began this initiative? The level of support from the company did surprise me. On one hand, you know there’s going to be a lot of support, but the amount of support at all levels has been great to see. And although I had high expectations, I still feel that a differentiating factor here is, we’re not posturing.  There are business leaders and segment leaders who will come to an event to support this initiative. And I don’t mean just show up; they participate. They make the time.  The outpouring of support from people throughout the organization has been incredible to watch. As a new employee, it is bigger than I expected.  We have more people interested in helping than we can sometimes accommodate.

A lot of companies now have veteran hiring initiatives.  What is unique to Humana’s? There is such an incredible abundance of opportunities for people to come into the organization and make a difference in real peoples’ lives on a daily basis.  I think that’s the competitive advantage.

About Humana: Headquartered in Louisville, Kentucky, Humana, Inc. is a leading health care company that offers a wide range of insurance products and health and wellness services that incorporate an integrated approach to lifelong well-being. By leveraging the strengths of its core businesses, Humana believes it can better explore opportunities for existing and emerging adjacencies in health care that can further enhance wellness opportunities for the millions of people across the nation with whom the company has relationships. Learn more at www.humana.com

‘Rich History’ of Hiring Veterans Points to Bright Future | Q&A with Humana’s Director of Talent Acquisition

July 17th, 2012 Comments off

Last May, health care company Humana, Inc. pledged to hire 1,000 military veterans and/or their spouses over a three-year period as part of President Obama’s nationwide veterans hiring challenge. Less than a year later, Humana is already ahead of schedule. As of this month, they’re already at 46 percent of their goal.

“Our estimate was to be at approximately 35 percent by this time. We feel good about where we are,” said Kevin Stakelum, Talent Acquisition Director at Humana, in a recent phone interview. Not long after Stakelum, a veteran of the military services himself, began his role at Humana, which already has a rich history of hiring military veterans and their spouses, he was charged with leading this new initiative. Under his supervision, his team works to help educate his fellow veterans about their career options and empower them with the skills and resources they need to create careers in the civilian workforce.

“Whether these veterans use the information and training we provide to take one of the jobs in our company, or whether they decide to take those skills to find jobs in other companies – either outcome is fine with us,” Stakelum says. He recently sat down with us to discuss more about Humana’s hiring initiative and what it means to both military veterans and the companies that hire them. 

How are you reaching out to veterans to recruit them? One of the key platforms of our strategy is the Veterans Talent Network. We decided to create a separate talent network because the message we want to send to veterans is a little different than the one we would send to civilians. They need a different level of information.  A lot of these people do not have experience in the civilian job market.  The Veterans Talent Network has allowed us to put more information in their hands.  Once we had that tool, we then created a strategy around how we were going to get our message out, and how we were actually going to make the hires. We also hired a veteran recruiting specialist to help us determine the right partnerships to form and the right approaches to help us take all the information that’s out there and boil it down just a little bit.

What is your particular involvement in this initiative? I lead the initiative. It was given to me in my first week here at Humana. There were a lot of things we had to start on, so I focused most on the basics. Once we had the basics down, we were  able to start focusing our efforts, reaching out and establishing key partnerships.  Then we were able to start gaining some momentum.  That’s kind of how this whole thing got started.  It’s just not me—I’m only a leader of an initiative, an action team.  The members of this action team were key in helping to guide our activities, make sure what we’re doing makes sense, and that we are continuing to do things that will enable the right things to be done.

When coming out of the Armed Services, did you have an easier time making the transition to the civilian workforce than others? Yes, because I was in the National Guard, so I had a civilian career on the side. The transition process at that time was very different than it is today. The National Guard members today are expected to go overseas for prolonged periods. Back then, it was still a commitment, but our commitment was more around “We’ll be activated if the country goes to war,” whereas it’s a little bit of a different mission now. 

How are you creating awareness throughout Humana with employees who aren’t necessarily directly tied to this initiative? We’re a large company, so there are going to be parts of the company which do not lend themselves to this initiative. That’s okay, because we’ve got plenty of parts of the company that do. The strength of the company is in its careerpathing and in the culture that allows people to grow. Before coming to Humana, I had never been involved in a company that allowed people to move so freely from one part of the company to another. I think that’s another thing that attracts veterans to this company: many veterans just want a chance to show what they can do. We’ve got everything from call center roles, all the way to executive roles. A person can come into a role for which they are qualified, show what they do and be rewarded for it. I think that’s something we are leveraging better than many.  

Has anything surprised you since you began this initiative? The level of support from the company did surprise me. On one hand, you know there’s going to be a lot of support, but the amount of support at all levels has been great to see. And although I had high expectations, I still feel that a differentiating factor here is, we’re not posturing.  There are business leaders and segment leaders who will come to an event to support this initiative. And I don’t mean just show up; they participate. They make the time.  The outpouring of support from people throughout the organization has been incredible to watch. As a new employee, it is bigger than I expected.  We have more people interested in helping than we can sometimes accommodate.

A lot of companies now have veteran hiring initiatives.  What is unique to Humana’s? There is such an incredible abundance of opportunities for people to come into the organization and make a difference in real peoples’ lives on a daily basis.  I think that’s the competitive advantage.

About Humana: Headquartered in Louisville, Kentucky, Humana, Inc. is a leading health care company that offers a wide range of insurance products and health and wellness services that incorporate an integrated approach to lifelong well-being. By leveraging the strengths of its core businesses, Humana believes it can better explore opportunities for existing and emerging adjacencies in health care that can further enhance wellness opportunities for the millions of people across the nation with whom the company has relationships. Learn more at www.humana.com

CareerBuilder’s 2012 Mid-Year Job Forecast: The Results Are In

July 5th, 2012 Comments off

CareerBuilder 2012 Mid-Year Job Forecast While it’s not safe to wear your “The U.S. Economy is Awesome” t-shirt yet, the jobs outlook for the second half of 2012 shows continued improvement over 2011, according to CareerBuilder’s 2012 U.S. Mid-Year Job Forecast, which was conducted by Harris Interactive© and included more than 2,000 hiring managers and human resource professionals.

 Who’s Planning to Hire?

  • Forty-four percent of private sector employers reported they are planning to hire full-time, permanent staff from July 1 through December 31, 2012, an increase of 9 percent over the same period last year.
  • For reference, 2011 had also shown improvement over 2010: 35 percent of companies indicated they planned to hire full-time, permanent staff, an increase of 7 percent from 2010.
  • Employers plan to add a mix of new employees over the next six months, with each category trending up from last year: 44 percent say they’re hiring full-time, permanent employees, up from 35 percent in 2011; 21 percent are hiring part-time employees, up from 15 percent in 2011, and 21 percent are hiring contract or temporary employees, up from 12 percent in 2011.

Download the Full Report

As Matt Ferguson, CEO of CareerBuilder, comments, the rate of recovery has been slower than expected, but we are seeing more widespread hiring:

“The rate of job creation has been slower than what we would have expected at this point in the recovery, but the market is stable. Two years ago, the hiring activity in the U.S. was driven primarily by large employers recruiting in metropolitan areas for a handful of industries or job functions.

Today, we see job listings in all industries, market sizes and company sizes. The outlook for the remainder of the year is better than 2011, but it will follow the same pattern of steady progress rather than a surge in job growth. Employers will remain careful as they assess barriers and opportunities for growth in the economy and their own businesses.”

Watch Ferguson talk more about the state of U.S. job recovery on CNBC’s Squawk Box:

Small Business Hiring

Hiring among small businesses is gradually gaining ground, but small businesses as a whole are still more cautious than other business segments and reported little change in their recruitment plans from last year. Of those business with 50 or fewer employees, for instance, 21 percent plan on hiring full-time, permanent employees, up from 20 percent in 2011.

Hiring in Metropolitan and Rural Areas is Up

Job creation is picking up in both big cities and outlying towns. Of employers who are hiring in the second half of this year, 75 percent said they will be recruiting for positions in large metropolitan areas, while 39 percent will be hiring in non-metropolitan, rural areas.

Hiring By Region: Who’s Leading the Way?

In comparing regions, the West is the most optimistic in terms of hiring plans for July through December and reported the highest year-over-year increase for adding full-time, permanent staff.

  • West: 47 percent of companies are hiring full-time, permanent employees, up from 35 percent in 2011.
  •  South: 45 percent are hiring full-time, permanent employees, up from 38 percent in 2011
  • Northeast: 44 percent are hiring full-time, permanent employees, up from 34 percent in 2011.
  • Midwest: 40 percent are hiring full-time, permanent employees, up from 32 percent in 2011.

Most In-Demand Industries 

It’s no surprise that businesses are focusing first on those positions that most greatly impact revenue and innovation. Customer service remains in the No. 1 recruitment spot, with information technology and sales rounding out the top three.

  • Customer Service – 24 percent
  • Information Technology – 22 percent
  • Sales – 21 percent
  • Administrative – 16 percent
  • Business Development – 13 percent
  • Accounting/Finance – 12 percent
  • Marketing – 11 percent.

Emerging Occupations

More employers are also creating completely new job functions within their organizations to respond to evolving business demands like online security, “big data” and social media. When asked if their organizations currently have positions that didn’t exist in their firms five years ago, employers listed the following:

  • Positions tied to social media – 16 percent
  • Positions tied to storing and managing data – 15 percent
  • Positions tied to cyber security – 12 percent
  • Positions tied to financial regulation – 10 percent
  • Positions tied to promoting diversity inside and outside the organization – 9 percent
  • Positions tied to green energy and the environment – 8 percent
  • Positions tied to global relations – 8 percent

Hiring in Q2 2012

Quarter by quarter, we’re seeing improvement, too: One-third (34 percent) of employers added full-time, permanent headcount in the second quarter of this year, up from 29 percent last year and 33 percent last quarter. Nine percent decreased headcount, while 56 percent made no change to staff levels and 1 percent were unsure.

Q2 2012 Hiring

Workers Are Leaving — and Employers are Starting to Take Notice

Workers are feeling better about their job prospects (or badly about their current situation), with one in four (27 percent) stating they are likely to leave their current jobs in the next 12 months, up slightly from 26 percent last year.

As the job market improves and more employees decide to make a move, the competition for in-demand talent is getting more intense:

  • Thirty-nine percent of employers are concerned that top talent will leave their organizations, up from 35 percent last year.
  • Twenty-one percent reported they lost top performers in the second quarter, up from 18 percent last year and 19 percent last quarter.

Want more? Get the full Mid-Year Job Forecast report.

 

The Impact of the U.S. Skills Gap and Vacancies on Revenue and Turnover

July 3rd, 2012 Comments off

CareerBuilder's 2012 Talent Crunch StudyRight now, there are more than 13.5 million unemployed people in the U.S. – but 2.5 million jobs are going unfilled every month. What’s going on here?

Our country is currently dealing with a talent crunch, or mismatch, of major proportions: There is a huge disconnect between what employers and job candidates perceive of one another, and it’s causing more jobs to go unfilled (and a lot of frustration).

Employers and candidates are misreading each other

While more than one-third of all companies have open positions which they can’t fill, many candidates are also having a hard time finding jobs for which they’re qualified. It turns out that employers and candidates are misinterpreting each other’s intentions and actions, leading to an increase, not a minimization, of the current skills gap.

See a side-by-side comparison of employer and candidate perceptions

Amazingly, 60 percent of companies are not doing anything about this, according to a new CareerBuilder Talent Crunch study among 1,648 U.S. hiring managers and human resource professionals and 2,036 U.S. job seekers.

Hardest-to-fill positions

The five areas U.S. enterprise organizations said are most difficult to recruit for are:

  • Engineering – 67 percent
  • C-level positions (CEO, CFO, CMO, etc.) – 60 percent
  • Information Technology – 60 percent
  • Research & Development – 54 percent
  • Production – 54 percent

The talent crunch is taking a toll on employees, too

  • One-third of employers (34 percent) reported that job vacancies have resulted in a lower quality of work due to employees being overworked.
  • 23 percent cited a loss in revenue.
  • 33 percent of employers said vacancies have caused lower morale, due to unfilled positions often translating into longer hours for existing staff.
  • 17 percent pointed to higher turnover within their organizations.

Realigning job skills

Employers have a big responsibility to turn the tide. As Matt Ferguson, CEO of CareerBuilder, stresses, “If we want to see more positive movement in the U.S. market, we have to do a better job of realigning the skills of our labor force with positions that are in high demand. Prolonged vacancies can result in lower quality work, lower sales and morale, and can cause a delay in creating other related positions within the organization.”

As he adds, many employers are being proactive about the issue and taking steps to lessen the skills gap: “Fortunately, we see more companies taking matters into their own hands and putting programs in place to retrain and transition workers into their industries or fields.”

Watch Jamie Womack explain the current talent crunch at SHRM 2012

Training, stealing and stretching

Some employers are heeding this advice to secure talent for hard-to-fill positions, making plans for everything from new training tactics to poaching talent from their competitors:

  • Fifty percent of employers of all sizes are planning to hire workers without experience in a particular industry or field and train them.
  • Thirty-one percent are planning to cross-train current employees.
  • 19 percent are targeting talent from competitors.
  • Nearly two-thirds are willing to stretch incentives such as offering flexible hours (25 percent), higher salary (22 percent) and remote work options (15 percent).

Two in five companies (41 percent) reported they already have programs in place to help alleviate the skills gap, including on-the-job training, mentoring, and sending employees back to school.

The job seeker’s perspective

Many U.S. job seekers, especially those in industries hit hard by the recession, are being forced to explore new industries to find employment, and the transition isn’t always easy: Around 25 percent of unemployed workers have been laid off since 2008. As a result, nearly two-thirds (64 percent) knowingly apply for a position for which they don’t possess the required skills, just to try to find some kind of employment.

Despite these setbacks, job candidates are willing to learn new skills, compromise on benefit packages, and participate in training. Additionally, 77 percent said they would be willing to take a job in a different field than the one in which they currently work. More than half (54 percent) say they would be open to relocating to a new city or state.

Recommendations for employers 

As an employer, there are four key ways you can begin to bridge the skills gap and help straighten out the current misperceptions of many job candidates:

  1. Reevaluate your organization’s training, re-training and re-skilling programs.
  2. Adopt a talent management philosophy for long-term, sustainable growth.
  3. Provide more productive feedback to candidates.
  4. Get smart about attracting and retaining top talent.

Get the full list of recommendations here.

Take a look at the stark contrast between employers’ and job seekers’ perceptions when it comes to everything from resume gaps to the current candidate pool:CareerBuilder's 2012 Talent Crunch Study

Check out all of CareerBuilder’s Talent Crunch study findings and recommendations — and sign up for our upcoming webinar, The Talent Mismatch.

 

CareerBuilder’s Talent Crunch study was produced in conjunction with CareerBuilder’s “Empowering Employment” initiative, a partnership effort that showcases the programs and learnings of companies who are committed to retraining workers and fueling job creation.

 

How Can Overworked Dads Find More Time for Family?

June 19th, 2012 Comments off

Working dad walking with his sonIs work keeping dads from their other very important job: Being a parent? 

Dads everywhere (Woody Allen aside) got the opportunity to spend quality time with their kids this past Father’s Day, though it appears this kind of “family time” may becoming more the exception than the rule. As it turns out, two in five working dads (43 percent) who have had a child in the last three years reported they didn’t take any paternity leave, according to CareerBuilder’s annual Father’s Day survey, conducted among 729 full-time working fathers with children 18 and under.

Even for those working dads who were able to take some, but not the full, allotted time off, 47 percent said they felt pressured by work to come back early, and 59 percent ended up taking only a week or less.

So, why are we seeing less balance for men between working life and life as a father? It appears that, across various industries, a still-struggling economy and the stress of prolonged economic certainty post-recession is causing many working dads to experience more work–and less time for father/child fishing excursions or trips to the ice cream shop.

As a result, decisions that involve supporting the family financially versus emotionally are often difficult to resolve:

  • Bringing work home: More than one-third of working dads (36 percent) said they bring home work from the office, up from 27 percent in 2008.
  • Likelihood of being a stay-at-home dad: Thirty-five percent of working dads said if their spouse or partner made enough money to support the family, they would consider trading their careers for a role as a stay-at-home dad (down from 37 percent in 2008).
  • Willingness to take a pay cut – While working dads want to spend more time with their families, the number of dads willing to take a pay cut to do so has dropped since the recession. Thirty-three percent of working dads reported they would take a pay cut if it meant they have more quality time at home, down from 37 percent in 2008.

Alex Green, general counsel for CareerBuilder and father of three, understands the need for work/family balance firsthand:

“For many households, the recession has affected family life as much as personal finances. Many families need dual incomes, and post-recession work environments often entail longer longer hours. Fortunately, we see more dads taking advantange of flexible work arrangements to try to make up the difference and have more quality time with their families.”

Twenty-two percent of fathers say their work has negatively affected relationships with their children, according to the survey, and 26 percent said work negatively affected relationships with their significant others. To help achieve a better work-life balance (and more sanity), Green recommends the following for working dads:

  • Talk about it.  Remember that communication is a two-way street. Besides just listening to what is going on at home, talk about what is going on in your office, so everyone understands why you are away or have to do some work when you are home.
  • Scheduling is key to success.  Add every family member’s schedule to one master calendar so there are no surprises. Also, save vacation days for important events and talk to your supervisor about flexible work arrangements.
  • Establish a “no work” zone.  Put down your Blackberry and avoid checking emails from the time you arrive home until after your children have gone to sleep.
  • Consider flexible work arrangements.  More companies are offering telecommuting options, flexible hours, condensed work weeks and other arrangements. Approach your boss with a game plan of how the new arrangement would work and how it will ultimately benefit the organization.
  • It is ok to say no!  In addition to actual work, activities associated with your job can sometimes take a toll on your free time. Determine what additional activities you can turn down and which are necessary so that you can free up more of your time outside the office.

What’s worked for you?

Working dads out there, do you have a solution that’s helped you better balance between the office and the family? Let us know.

How MAXIMUS Empowers Employment to Build a Stronger Economy

April 19th, 2012 Comments off

Mark Andrekovich MAXIMUSCareerBuilder is proud to be working with MAXIMUS, where finding qualified jobs for qualified candidates is the ultimate goal. We help MAXIMUS find the talent they need to position both clients and candidates for success in today’s workforce. CareerBuilder believes in doing our part to contribute to a stronger economy, and we believe helping companies like Maximus empower employment is the way to get there.

We recently got the opportunity to talk to Mark Andrekovich, chief of human capital for MAXIMUS, on how his organization works to empower employment.

CareerBuilder: When you hear the term Empowering Employment, what does that term mean to you?

Andrekovich: At MAXIMUS, we operate several workforce services projects across the United States, Australia, the United Kingdom, and we just recently launched a new project in Canada. When we staff these operations, we look for employees who are passionate about helping others. We primarily serve welfare-to-work clients, many of whom have never even held a steady job, much less a sustainable career. Our case managers recognize the barriers faced by workforce services program participants, but they provide encouragement and connect them to resources that will help them obtain a lifestyle of employment.

In our Tax Credit and Employer business line, we help organizations maximize available tax credits through programs that support hiring from targeted populations, including veterans, individuals with disabilities, and long-term welfare recipients. Our MAXOutreach® solution links employers and community-based organizations to help uncover hard-to-reach, tax credit-eligible applicants. So MAXIMUS empowers employment by helping job seekers obtain the right combination of skills and connecting them to job opportunities, while also assisting businesses and other organizations identify new tax-eligible candidates.

CareerBuilder: What areas of your business do you believe are the most important to invest in in today’s market?

Andrekovich: Our investments in people, process and technology have led to our company’s success today and will help drive our growth in the future. Our people support critical public programs – helping low-income families obtain health insurance coverage or supporting them as they transition from welfare into sustainable employment. The work they do requires a level of familiarity with government programs that are constantly evolving, so we make investments in training and re-training programs, as well as the necessary knowledge development needed to execute our business model.

At the same time, we are investing in the processes and technology that make our operations run smoothly. We place a high value on business process management strategies, which we use to operate more efficient government programs. We make regular refreshes to our internal technology systems and look for ways to leverage shared services across the organization.

CareerBuilder: There’s been a lot of discussion lately around “hiring for culture (or attitude) and training for skills.” Is this something you practice at your organization? Why or why not?

Andrekovich: MAXIMUS certainly takes cultural fit into account when we hire new employees. However, we also look at subject matter or technological expertise, depending on the position. The common thread we look for in new hires is the willingness to work hard and a shared commitment to our founding mission of Helping Government Serve the People®.

CareerBuilder: What skills – both technical and soft – do you see most valuable to today’s businesses?

Andrekovich: We look for candidates who have a level of technological expertise relevant to the position, but also the adaptability to learn new technologies and processes. Since we are a service-orientated Company, we seek trustworthy candidates who demonstrate personal pride in their work and a strong work ethic.

CareerBuilder: Where do you see your workforce in five or 10 years in terms of growth?

Andrekovich: MAXIMUS is experiencing growth in all our operations, in the US and abroad, so we definitely anticipate a more global workforce. As governments continue to seek more efficient public programs, we believe we will grow more technology-focused as well. MAXIMUS has experienced steady growth in recent years, so we anticipate this trend will continue in the years to come.


If you are proactively taking steps to drive economic growth in your local community or nationwide, we want to hear about it.

We may contact you about participating in our Empowering Employment series. Visit www.empoweringemployment.com for more information.

__________________________________________________________________

About Mark Andrekovich: Mark Andrekovich serves as the chief of human capital for MAXIMUS and president of the company’s Tax Credit and Employer Services business. Mark leveraged his human capital expertise to introduce innovative I-9, E-Verify and OFCCP Compliance services for hundreds of large and small employers for the Tax Credit and Employer Services business. Mark is an active member of the Human Resource Policy Association and the National Industry Liaison Group, and serves on the Business Advisory Council of Clarion University’s Dana Still School of Business. He is a highly sought after speaker on topics of Human Capital Strategy, OFCCP Compliance and Diversity Recruitment.

Prior to joining MAXIMUS, Mark worked for Banister International, a private human capital and executive search firm in Philadelphia. He has more than 20 years of comprehensive human resources experience with multi-national companies such as General Electric, Nordson Corporation and Cytec Industries. Mark holds a B.S. in business administration from Clarion University and an M.B.A. from Monmouth University.

About MAXIMUS: For nearly 40 years, MAXIMUS has operated under its founding mission of Helping Government Serve the People®. The company delivers administrative solutions for Medicaid, CHIP, Medicare, welfare-to- work programs, child support services, as well as specialized consulting services. MAXIMUS offers a single-market focus and a unique understanding of how to deliver high quality, cost-effective solutions tailored for all levels of government.

Hey, Employers! America Wants You (to Hire Veterans)

February 21st, 2012 Comments off

U.S. VeteranFor U.S. veterans, returning to the workforce isn’t exactly easy. As of October 2011, more than 850,000 veterans were unemployed, and the jobless rate for post-9/11 veterans was 12.1 percent — well over the national average. According to whitehouse.gov, more than 1 million service members are projected to leave the military between 2011 and 2016.

CAREERBUILDER, “AMERICA WANTS YOU,” AND FREE JOB EXPOSURE

Despite these challenges, the situation just got brighter: Military veterans looking for work in this economy have a new champion in America Wants You, an effort bringing together the private sector and corporate America to find job opportunities for men and women who have served in the U.S. military. As the initiative’s chairman and CEO John S. Pike (who is a veteran himself), says, “America Wants You and its supporters are calling out to the corner offices to stand up and do their duty. It’s a corporate call to arms. There is no employer too big or too small to aid in this American effort.”

We’ve talked in the past about the multitude of reasons your business should be hiring veterans, and as President Obama said when referring to veterans’ wide range of skills, “This is exactly the kind of leadership and responsibility that every American business should be competing to attract.”

Now, CareerBuilder is powering the job engine for America Wants You, giving employers all over the nation an absolutely free way to expose their jobs to out-of-work military veterans who just may be the perfect fit for that quality and training analyst, RN, or project manager position you need to fill. Want to be one of the leaders in raising employment for veterans? Post your jobs for FREE on AmericaWantsYou in just a few simple steps.

POSTING YOUR JOBS TO AMERICAWANTSYOU.NET IS EASY (AND EVEN BETTER, IT’S FREE!):

To post a job to America Wants You, simply:

1.  Register for an account or sign into your current CareerBuilder account.

2. Send a blank email to jobs@americawantsyou.net from the email address registered to your CareerBuilder account. You will receive an email back confirming your CareerBuilder account has been added to America Wants You’s job search engine.

3. Log into your CareerBuilder account, choose “AmericaWantsYou” as your job type, and start posting! Your jobs will be instantly added to AWY’s database.

4. Done! Your job posting will be active until it’s filled and/or you remove it from your CareerBuilder account. When you receive new applications, CareerBuilder will email them to you.

*Note: If you’re an employer with more than 25 open jobs, contact jobs@americawantsyou.net for help automating your job postings.

A MESSAGE FROM CHRIS O’DONNELL

For those who want to learn more about the America Wants You effort (or who still, like me, sometimes quote “Circle of Friends,”) here is actor Chris O’Donnell discussing the importance of helping veterans in our current job market:

WHY HIRE VETERANS?

With their military background, extensive training, specialized skills and breadth of experience, veterans bring many unique elements to the workforce.  A few that you may not have considered:

  1. Trustworthiness: Many military personnel have achieved some level of security clearance, demonstrating that he or she is recognized as a trustworthy person.
  2. Background checks: With an honorable discharge, service members are essentially certified drug-free, and they have already had to go through rigorous background checks to be admitted into the military.
  3. Dealing with high stress-situations: Veterans know the importance of deadlines, and they’re accustomed to being in high-stress situations and trained to deal appropriately and effectively. Though civilian workplaces offer different types of pressures, there’s likely nothing you can throw at them that’s more high stress than situations they’ve encountered while serving.
  4. Tech savvy and international awareness: Veterans, because of the necessity to be aware of global affairs, are often one step ahead of many other workers when it comes to IT knowledge or the latest business trend or international security issue — not to mention IT training and hands-on skills.

CareerBuilder asked employers who have hired U.S. veterans or members of the National Guard to list the top attributes military personnel brought to their organization, and the following assets topped the list:

  • Disciplined approach to work – 66 percent
  • Ability to work as a team – 65 percent
  • Respect and integrity – 58 percen
  •  Leadership skills – 56 percent
  • Problem-solving skills – 54 percent
  • Ability to perform under pressure – 53 percent
  • Communication skills – 45 percent

For more information about the America Wants You initiative, please visit AmericaWantsYou.net.

Are you planning on hiring veterans this year–or have you already? Let us know in the comments.

Is Traditional Retirement Disappearing? How Older Workers Are Redefining Their Careers

February 16th, 2012 Comments off

Mature worker lost in thoughtHey, remember when retiring was a ‘thing’? Those were the days.” While hearing that phrase might sound odd now, the fading out of traditional retirement not be so far off the mark: Fifty-seven percent of workers ages 60 and older said in a new Harris Interactive© study they would look for a new job after retiring from their current company–a sign that these days, retirement doesn’t necessarily mean the end of someone’s career. Some workers are postponing retirement out of economic necessity; they just can’t afford to quit. Others, however, are in fact choosing to continue the nine-to-five routine, for many different reasons (which I’ll get into more below).

The survey, conducted on behalf of CareerBuilder and PrimeCB.com (CareerBuilder’s job site for mature workers and retirees) among 3,023 hiring managers and HR professionals and 878 U.S. workers ages 60 and older, also found that 11 percent of respondents said they don’t think they’ll ever be able to retire.

Despite that discouraging statistic, there are still a good number of workers who, although they may not be ready quite yet, believe they’ll be able to retire within the next several years:

  • 1-2 years (26 percent)
  • 3-4 years (23 percent)
  •  5-6 years (22 percent)
  • 7-8 years (7 percent)
  • 9-10 years (7 percent)
  • More than 10 years (4 percent)

More hiring on the horizon

As an increasing number of older workers are putting off retirement, whether by choice or financial necessity, the timing of many employers couldn’t be better: Many of them are looking to hire within the 50-and-older demographic. This is great news, because as we’ve discussed previously, many older workers who want or need to continue working are unable to do so, simply because they can’t find an employer who will hire them. According to the survey:

  • 43 percent of employers plan to hire workers ages 50 and older this year.
  • 41 percent said they hired workers ages 50 and older in 2011.
  • 75 percent of the employers surveyed would consider an application from an overqualified worker who 50 or older, with 59 percent of those employers saying they would do this because mature candidates bring a wealth of knowledge to an organization and can mentor others. (Note: Older workers have been found to have a host of other advantages as well, including quitting less, being absent less, and having better social skills and job performance than their younger counterparts).
As Rosemary Haefner, vice president of human resources at CareerBuilder, points out, many workers are moving away from a traditional “retirement” concept and instead seeking “rehirement”:

“Whether mature workers are motivated by financial concerns or simply enjoy going to work every day, we’re seeing more people move away from the traditional definition of retirement and seek ‘rehirement.’ At the same time, employers are seeing the value these mature workers can bring to an organization, from their intellectual capital to their mentoring and training capabilities. In a highly competitive job market, mature workers can use these skills to their advantage.”

 

Finding out what older workers want

With more companies seeking the unique skills older workers offer, it’s vital for companies to know (or learn) what these workers want. Many of them want to keep working to stay active, keep busy and be social. They also want things like a friendly work environment, a chance to use their skills and depth of experience, respect from coworkers, the opportunity to learn, and a way to help others and do something meaningful.

When it comes to benefits, many older workers are seeking adequate paid time off, health care and insurance coverage, and a flexible schedule (doesn’t sound much different than what workers of all generations are seeking, does it?)

I recently saw lawyer Simon Heath speak at 2012′s HRPA conference about  older workers and age discrimination, and he also shared a few examples of methods employers may need to consider when accommodating older employees in the workplace:

  • Flexible hours and conditions of work (i.e. compressed work weeks, flex time, and telecommuting).
  • Part-time arrangements and job sharing, which both allow for a transition to retirement.
  • Employing workers who have already retired on short term and/or fixed term contracts.

Managing a multi-generational workforce

While things may be moving in a positive direction for older workers when it comes to being hired–or “rehired” – an older workforce is creating many age-related changes in the workplace that many companies aren’t prepared to deal with. How can employers make a multi-generational workplace smoother for a generation that’s no longer retiring?

As Peter Cappelli, co-author of Managing the Older Worker: How to Prepare for the New Organizational Order, discussed at SHRM this past year, organizations can take steps to better work with older workers in their organization:

  • Tailor your rewards and benefits to their lifestyle and interests: The promotion, bonus or stock options don’t matter as much to older workers, as mentioned above. Instead, provide motivation through meaningful work and social relationships; these factors are a bigger priority for older workers than financial- or career advancement-motivated rewards.
  • Consult and empower them: Older workers want to be consulted, so ask them to participate in the decision process on a project or challenge a bit more. They have experience behind them and wisdom to solve many workplace problems, so ask them to get involved.
  • Don’t ignore them: Older workers don’t want to be ignored, and they still need to be managed. Remember that managing someone older doesn’t mean you’re giving up authority; older workers must be held accountable, too.
  • Initiate mentoring/onboarding: Companies like Deloitte have taken advantage of older workers’ unique talents by asking them to share problems they see in the organization that they’d like to work on and fix. Their attitude is, “If you think it’s a good idea, we will too, almost without exception. We trust you.”

 

Is your organization hiring more seasoned workers this year? What unique skills and experience do you see them bringing to the workplace?

 

Relocation Nation 2012: How Workers and Employers Are Making a Move

January 18th, 2012 Comments off

Worker packing for relocationWe’ve talked recently about how voluntary turnover is on the rise this year. As it turns out, many of those workers may not be remaining anywhere near their own backyard when they leave their current job.

A whopping 44 percent of workers say they’ll relocate this year for the right job, according to a new CareerBuilder survey conducted by Harris Interactive© among more than 3,000 hiring managers and HR professionals and nearly 8,000 U.S. workers. Many employers are doing their best to make the stress of moving worthwhile: Nearly a third say they’ll foot the relocation bill in return for great new talent.

(See the Infographic)

A new way for out-of-area workers and employers to get in touch

Fast on the heels of this trend, CareerBuilder has just launched CareerRelocate.com, a site dedicated to helping workers and employers connect and turn job relocation opportunities into realities. Employers can post jobs and search resumes through CareerRelocate.com, and candidates have many options as well when it comes to making the right career move (literally and figuratively). As Matt Ferguson, CEO of CareerBuilder, explains, “CareerRelocate.com helps workers identify relocation opportunities and understand related costs, so they have the right information in hand for their next career move.”

Through CareerRelocate.com, workers are able to:

  • Run a simple keyword or category search and view a map detailing where the most and fewest opportunities are for their line of work.
  • View actual relocation opportunities in different cities.
  • Learn what they would need to earn in order to maintain their current standard of living in another city.
  • Research homes, property values, mortgage quotes, moving and storage costs.
  • Tap into articles and advice on relocating and hiring trends.

Let’s take a closer look at what’s in store for worker relocation this year:

In 2011, many laid-off workers turned to jobs out of their area to find new work. Of full-time workers who were laid off in the last year and found new jobs, 20 percent relocated to a new city or state, according to a September 2011 CareerBuilder study.

“One of the key trends we saw coming out of the recession is the movement of labor in and out of markets across the U.S. Workers have had to expand their job search geographically and employers in need of hard-to-find, skilled talent have had to recruit across state lines,” says Ferguson.

Positions most likely to pay (for the move)

Employers who are experiencing challenges finding workers for skilled positions said they’re willing to pay to bring on great new people: 32 percent reported they would be willing to pay to relocate new employees in 2012, and 19 percent would be willing to pay a smaller first year salary in order to give a signing bonus to relocate an employee.

While employers say they’re willing to pay both current staff and new hires for a wide variety of positions, the areas which they’re most likely to pay to relocate employees are tied to technology and revenue-generation:

  • Engineering – 30 percent of employers
  • Information Technology – 23 percent
  • Business Development – 21 percent
  • Sales – 21 percent
  • Financial – 16 percent
  • Marketing – 13 percent
  • Legal – 11 percent

Owners of a lonely heart?

We’re all human, and sometimes work changes call for sacrifices we’re not thrilled to make, even if they are best for us in the long run. It’s not a surprise, then, that some workers who relocated last year experienced pangs of loneliness or doubt: 41 percent of them said their family wasn’t able to relocate with them and they had to travel to see them.

Here’s what workers said topped the list when it came to their other biggest relocation challenges:

  • Cost of living was higher – 26 percent
  • Caused more stress on the family unit – 24 percent
  • It was difficult to make new friends – 18 percent
  • They were feeling homesick – 16 percent

No looking back

Seventy-seven percent of workers who relocated in the last year reported they were happy with the move and didn’t regret their decision. How did workers say they benefited the most?

  • Made a fresh start – 30 percent
  • Made new friends – 31 percent
  • Had new experiences they wouldn’t have had anywhere else – 29 percent
  • Earning at a higher level gave their family more spending options – 27 percent
  • Better long-term career opportunities – 22 percent
  • Area was nicer and schools were better – 19 percent

Check out our “Relocation Nation” infographic to get a snapshot of relocation trends for 2012:

CareerBuilder: Relocation Nation 2012

 Are you planning on looking for out-of-area candidates this year to get the right employees in the door? Will you pay for relocation costs?

36% of Companies Are Leaning on Temporary Workers to Support Slim Staffs

January 9th, 2012 Comments off

Ready and able workersIt’s 2012. The year of presidential elections; the year of the world’s end, if you ask some; and, according to the results of a new survey conducted by Harris Interactive© of more than 3,000 hiring managers and HR professionals, the year of the temporary and contract worker?! Well, while that might be a stretch, it appears that 36 percent of companies will hire contract or temporary workers this year, up from 34 percent in 2011, 30 percent in 2010, and 28 percent in 2009.

Why the increase in demand for temporary and contract workers? 

As many of us are painfully aware, more than one-third (35 percent, to be exact) of American companies are operating with smaller staffs than before the recession. To address business needs and keep pace with market demand, many are turning to staffing and recruiting companies and temporary workers. And it’s good news for many employees: 35 percent of the companies hiring temporary and contract workers this year have plans to bring them on on a permanent basis.

When the hiring is happening

Some companies’ temporary hiring movement is already in full swing, and they’re not alone: 27 percent of companies will hire temporary or contract workers in Q1 2012.  As Eric Gilpin, president of CareerBuilder Staffing & Recruiting Group, pointed out, “Temporary jobs from staffing and recruiting firms are playing an increasingly important role in the economic recovery. Employers are relying on temporary and contract workers to support leaner staffs, and in many cases, will transition those workers to permanent roles.”

The most in-demand staffing and recruiting positions

We know that temporary and contract hiring is already happening — but where is it happening most?

Based on data from CareerBuilder’s Supply & Demand Portal, these are the most in-demand staffing and recruiting positions, broken down by industry:

Health Care
1) Occupational or Physical Therapist
2) Speech Language Pathologist

Industrial
1) Maintenance Technician or Mechanic
2) CNC (Computer Numerical Control) Machinist Information

Technology
 1) Java or .Net Developer
2) Network Engineer

Office-Clerical
1) Administrative Assistant
2) Customer Service Representative

Professional-Managerial
1) Business Analyst
2) Marketing Assistant

Temporary workers can provide a needed talent boost for businesses, while enjoying the flexibility that comes along with these types of jobs. “Candidates will find good pay, flexibility, opportunities to change careers, valuable skills training, and a bridge to permanent employment,” said Richard Wahlquist, president and CEO of the American Staffing Association.

Does your business plan on bringing on more temporary or contract staff this year (or have you already done so)? We’d love to hear how it’s turned out for you in the comments below. 

Employers Plan to Bring Back Middle Management Positions

November 17th, 2011 Comments off

employers welcome back middle managersFirst it was Arrested Development. Then it was Beavis and Butthead, followed by layaway and (presumably) pantyhose. Now, the latest comeback story of the season involves middle management.

Middle management positions were a significant casualty of recession-era layoffs, but new research from CareerBuilder’s various industry sites indicate that many employers saw counterproductive consequences and are now rehiring for those positions.

Employers surveyed in the retail, IT and healthcare industries indicated plans to bring back previously eliminated middle management jobs for the purpose of bringing structural gaps and addressing market demands. When assessing the impact of downsizing middle management, employers who made cuts in these industries cited both positive effects (cost-savings and more efficient operations) as well as negative ones (structural and emotional drawbacks).

Don’t know what you got till it’s gone?
According to industry experts, part of the reason for the resurgence in middle management jobs is that employers are now realizing just how essential middle management is to the organization.

“Middle management often gets a bad rap for adding bureaucratic layers to an organization, but these roles can be essential in maintaining team cohesion, retaining core talent and providing direction to workers,” says Bill Meidell, product director of WorkInRetail.com

Jamie Carney, product director of Sologig.com, agrees. “When a department lacks leadership or direction, it is easier to see the value of middle management,” Carney says. “The data suggests that middle management plays an important role in making an employee’s work experience meaningful and productive.”

“Middle management is essential to providing balance and direction within complex organizations,” adds Rob Morris, product director of MiracleWorkers.com. “They play important roles from onboarding new employees and tracking progress to building positive morale and maintaining chains of communication – all things that are difficult to do without.”

Check out details for each industry survey below…

Retail
According to a WorkinRetail.com survey of 240 retail employers, of the 30 percent of retail employers who’ve eliminated middle management positions since the beginning of the recession, 32 percent plan to bring back these jobs.

While 73 percent of retail employers reported that cuts netted beneficial results, 77 percent indicated the following drawbacks:

  • Lower morale (39 percent)
  • Lower productivity (32 percent)
  • Workers less motivated (30 percent
  • Less communication given regarding company news (27 percent)
  • Training is less effective (25 percent)
  • Workers are less organized (24 percent)

Information Technology
A Sologig.com survey of 195 IT employers found that nearly half (45 percent) of the 27 percent of IT employers who’ve eliminated middle management positions since the beginning of the recession plan to bring back those jobs back.

While 73 percent reported that cuts netted beneficial results such as cost-savings and more efficient operations, 76 percent listed the following negative results:

  • Lower morale (39 percent)
  • Less succession planning (28 percent)
  • Higher turnover (26 percent)
  • Workers are less organized (24 percent)
  • Less communication given regarding company news (24 percent)
  • Less recognition for workers (23 percent)

Healthcare
Nearly a quarter (24 percent) of healthcare employers has eliminated middle management positions since the beginning of the recession, according to a MiracleWorkers.com survey of 282 healthcare employers. Of these employers, 44 percent plan to bring those jobs back.

While 81 percent reported that cuts netted beneficial results such as cost-savings and more efficient operations, 74 percent stated there were several structural and emotional drawbacks:

  • Lower morale (47 percent)
  • Workers less motivated (27 percent)
  • Training is less effective (26 percent)
  • Less communication given regarding company news (25 percent)
  • Less succession planning (23 percent)
  • Less recognition for workers (22 percent)

Is your organization bringing back previously-eliminated positions?

Veterans Day 2011: A Closer Look at the Challenges and Opportunities Veterans Face

November 10th, 2011 Comments off

Honoring World War II Veterans, 1945Tomorrow, on Veterans Day 2011, we take time to honor the scores of men and women who have fought for our freedoms. While we often honor our military veterans with words, how can we make a difference by taking action on some of those words? A great way for businesses to take the lead on this is by hiring a veteran. This Veterans Day is an opportune time for all of us to take a closer look at the strengths veterans bring to the workplace and discuss ways to help tackle the challenges many face — and a new CareerBuilder survey of more than 2,800 hiring managers helps us do just that.

What kinds of challenges are veterans facing?

Well, as of October 2011, more than 850,000 veterans were unemployed, and the jobless rate for post-9/11 veterans was 12.1 percent — well over the national average. This problem isn’t going away, but instead becoming more of a challenge: According to whitehouse.gov, more than 1 million service members are projected to leave the military between 2011 and 2016.

Veterans’ skills are often highly specialized, and it is sometimes difficult for them to determine how to translate those skills to those that employers are seeking in a civilian workplace environment.

Brent Rasmussen, president of CareerBuilder North America, has some advice for veterans struggling to reconnect and adapt to a civilian workforce:

“The survey shows that employers recognize the unique value military experience can bring, but that they don’t always understand how military skills fit into corporate America. Veterans will need to clearly make that connection in their resume, cover letter and job interviews as they enter this new chapter of their careers.”

New job resources for veterans

Resources are popping up everywhere to help veterans adjust to their new civilian lives and find jobs. In New Brunswick, NJ, for example, veterans are learning to release stress, heal, and adapt to civilian life through music classes, and CareerBuilder has recently launched a job site matching military veterans and employers, EmployVets.com. Exclusively for veterans returning to the job force, the site includes a tool for discovering how one’s military skills translate to the civilian world, career advice and resources, and much more. Sites like VETransfer are aimed at helping veterans with an entrepreneurial streak start their own businesses by connecting them with financing and equipping them with the necessary resources to get their venture started.

Veterans who believe they have a skills gap hindering their job search can also participate in the CareerBuilder Re-Employment Initiative, a paid internship program aimed at helping veterans and unemployed job seekers bridge the IT skills gap. This paid program will consist of several weeks of classroom training followed by up to six months of on-the-job, hands-on training with an assigned CareerBuilder software developer. Interested?  See the job description and apply here.

For veterans coming off active duty: How can you increase opportunities for employment?

  • Speak their language. Two in five employers (41 percent) reported it can be difficult to decipher how military experience fits into civilian positions. It’s important to highlight specific military skills and spell out how they are relevant to the responsibilities listed in the employer’s job ad. For example, if you served in the infantry, there are many relatable skills for police or security guard positions or for training roles within organizations.
  • Advertise your experience. More than one-in-four employers (27 percent) said one of the biggest challenges in recruiting U.S. veterans for open positions is that veterans don’t always market their military experience. Include your military experience with a bulleted list of accomplishments that shows how you put your knowledge into action.

Government initiatives

The White House is doing something about the employment challenge veterans face — and many businesses are following suit. President Obama has just announced several initiatives to help unemployed military veterans, including the Veteran Gold Card, which gives the more than 200,000 unemployed 9/11 veterans access to enhanced services like six months of personalized case management, assessments and counseling at career centers across the country.

He is also currently urging members of Congress to pass two provisions to the American Jobs Act that will provide tax credits to businesses that hire military veterans: 1) The “Returning Heroes Tax Credit,” which provides firms that hire unemployed veterans with a maximum credit of $5,600 per veteran, and the “Wounded Warriors Tax Credit,” which offers firms that hire veterans with service-connected disabilities with a maximum credit of $9,600 per veteran.

Some businesses are taking the lead

More good news: Despite battling a higher-than-average unemployment rate, those returning from military duty and re-entering the workforce may find better employment prospects over the next year:

  • One in five (20 percent) employers reported they are actively recruiting U.S. veterans to work for their organizations over the next 12 months
  • 14 percent of employers are actively recruiting members of the National Guard.

Which industries offer the best options for veteran hiring?

Employers are planning to tap into the technical and communications skills and leadership abilities of U.S. service men and women. More than one-third of employers plan to hire for Information Technology positions, which topped the list of hot areas for hiring U.S. veterans.

  • Information Technology – 36 percent
  • Customer Service – 28 percent
  • Engineering – 25 percent
  • Sales – 22 percent

Why hire a veteran?

We’ve talked in the past about the multitude of reasons your business should be hiring veterans, and as President Obama said when referring to veterans’ wide range of skills, “This is exactly the kind of leadership and responsibility that every American business should be competing to attract.”

With their military background, extensive training, specialized skills and breadth of experience, veterans bring many unique elements to the workforce.  A few that you may not have considered:

  1. Trustworthiness: Many military personnel have achieved some level of security clearance, demonstrating that he or she is recognized as a trustworthy person.
  2. Background checks: With an honorable discharge, service members are essentially certified drug-free, and they have already had to go through rigorous background checks to be admitted into the military.
  3. Dealing with high stress-situations: Veterans know the importance of deadlines, and they’re accustomed to being in high-stress situations and trained to deal appropriately and effectively. Though civilian workplaces offer different types of pressures, there’s likely nothing you can throw at them that’s more high stress than situations they’ve encountered while serving.
  4. Tech savvy and international awareness: Veterans, because of the necessity to be aware of global affairs, are often one step ahead of many other workers when it comes to IT knowledge or the latest business trend or international security issue — not to mention IT training and hands-on skills.

CareerBuilder asked employers who have hired U.S. veterans or members of the National Guard to list the top attributes military personnel brought to their organization.

The following assets topped the list:

  • Disciplined approach to work – 66 percent
  • Ability to work as a team – 65 percent
  • Respect and integrity – 58 percen
  •  Leadership skills – 56 percent
  • Problem-solving skills – 54 percent
  • Ability to perform under pressure – 53 percent
  • Communication skills – 45 percent
In addition to the many skills and talents veterans bring to the workplace, hiring veterans can improve a business’s bottom line. Tools like HireGauge from Think Beyond the Label, a public-private partnership dedicated to increasing jobs for disabled people, helps businesses large and small crunch numbers to figure out exactly how much of a monetary benefit hiring people with disabilities will bring. A typical business can realize monetary benefits of nearly $32,000 per hire -– and even more for hiring a qualified veteran with a disability.


 What veteran job initiatives have you read about — or are you a part of — that are exciting to you? Is your business taking steps to hire veterans or help them re-acclimate to the workforce?

What Do Employers Predict This Season Will Bring For Holiday Hiring?

November 3rd, 2011 Comments off

 

Seasonal staff for busy holiday seasonAs the carved pumpkins of Halloween were being given their final touches and trick-or-treating hosts were filling up their baskets for throngs of excited children, stores across the U.S. were already looking ahead to winter holidays — and many employers had already lined up their seasonal staff for the busy time ahead. Yes, seasonal hiring is in full swing, and though employers expect to hire at similar levels this year as last, according to a new CareerBuilder survey of more than 2,600 employers, a year’s time has brought more perks in pay, 29 percent of retailers planning to have extra hands on deck around the holidays (a moderate decline from 2010), and nearly one-third of employers planning to turn some seasonal staff into full-time, permanent members of their team.

INFOGRAPHIC: ‘Tis the Season for Holiday Hiring: What Employers Predict This Year Will Bring

Sales, customer service, technology, shipping, and administrative support are all hot areas for holiday hiring this season — let’s take a closer look at what else is happening:

Retail and hospitality outlook

As mentioned above, nearly three in ten retailers will have extra staff on hand to help this holiday season, a moderate decline from last year, and 10 percent of hospitality companies will add seasonal staff this year, the same percentage as last year. What do the similar patterns in seasonal hiring from last year to this year mean for the economy?

As Matt Ferguson, CEO of CareerBuilder, explained:

“Employers are keeping the status quo for holiday hiring as economic uncertainties shake consumer confidence,” said Matt Ferguson, CEO of CareerBuilder. “While retail has the lion’s share of seasonal jobs, you can also find opportunities in various industries and corporate roles.”

Where is seasonal hiring happening industry-wide?

Many different types of companies are hiring for seasonal staff this year, in various functional areas where they need help the most during the holiday rush. Across all industries, popular areas for recruitment this holiday season include:

  • Customer Service – 30 percent
  • Administrative/Clerical support – 16 percent
  • Shipping/Delivery – 15 percent
  • Technology – 12 percent
  • Inventory management – 10 percent
  • Non-retail sales – 9 percent
  • Accounting/Finance – 8 percent
  • Marketing – 8 percent

Better pay is on the way

While the number of seasonal staff being brought on for the next few months may not look all that different than last year, one thing near and dear to many workers’ hearts has changed: what they’re getting paid. More than half of employers (53 percent) reported they will pay $10 or more per hour to seasonal staff, up from 48 percent who said the same last year. Fourteen percent will pay $16 or more, up from 9 percent last year. How does your business compare when it comes to pay — are you paying more or less this year?

Seasonal hiring: Still going strong

While there tends to be a mad rush to secure a seasonal job once the leaves start to change, many employers are still recruiting for candidates deep into the snowy underbrush of the winter holiday season:

It's Still Open Season for Seasonal Hiring

  • Thirty-three percent of employers who are hiring seasonal staff reported they are still recruiting for open positions in November.
  • Eleven percent said they may still be recruiting as late as December.

If you’re still recruiting for seasonal staff, you may want to check out WorkinRetail.com, which connects retail job seekers with employers looking to fill retail positions from in-store to corporate and everywhere in between. It’s the perfect place to recruit for seasonal retail candidates when you need to find the right people fast.

From seasonal to all-season employees

Nearly one-third (30 percent) of employers who are hiring seasonal help plan to transition some employees into full-time, permanent staff, meaning there is a lot of room for workers to make their mark this season and secure a great job. Workers looking to turn their seasonal gig into a full-time, permanent position should consider the key traits employers are seeking for seasonal-to-permanent staff.

Many of the things employers are looking for revolve around employees being proactive, offering help above and beyond what is asked, and, believe it or not, simply showing interest in a full-time gig. When you look at the below criteria a bit more closely, most of the items mentioned are things all kinds of employers are looking for in their employees.

To stand out as a candidate for a long-term opportunity, hiring managers recommended the following:

  • Provide above and beyond customer service. Offer help instead of waiting to be asked for it. – 66 percent
  • Let the employer know up front that you’re interested in permanent employment – 49 percent
  • Proactively ask for more projects – 45 percent
  • Ask thoughtful questions about the organization – 39 percent
  • Present ideas on how to do something better or try something new – 34 percent

Employers’ biggest seasonal hiring turnoffs

What are the biggest turnoffs for employers when interviewing for seasonal jobs? A lack of flexibility or expressed interest, unawareness of the company or brand, and discount-job-shopping top the list, according to employers surveyed:

  • Someone who is unwilling to work certain hours – 70 percent
  • Someone who isn’t enthusiastic – 63 percent
  • Someone who is more interested in the discount than anything else – 40 percent
  • Someone who knows nothing about our company/products – 36 percent
  • Someone who shows up wearing clothes or merchandise from a competitor’s store – 22 percent

 

Read the full press release, send a snapshot to your co-worker with our seasonal hiring infographic, or snag the right seasonal candidates.

 

Do these results fall in line with what your organization is planning for seasonal hiring this year?

 

CareerBuilder CEO and Warren Buffett Talk U.S. Job Creation and Economic Recovery

October 28th, 2011 Comments off

Matt Ferguson, CareerBuilder CEOWhen (almost) alone in a room with American business magnate and investor Warren Buffett, what do you ask him? CareerBuilder CEO Matt Ferguson appeared on Bloomberg Television’s “In the Loop” this morning to talk about just that. Buffett, Ferguson and a few other business leaders met last evening during Buffett’s stop in Chicago for an event for Junior Achievement, and discussed everything from U.S. job creation and the outlook for our nation’s economic recovery, to philosophies on business and the housing market.

This was the first time Buffett and Ferguson had gotten a chance to meet. On “In the Loop,” Ferguson shared a couple of highlights from their discussion:

  • Long-term predictions: Buffett believes that, while the U.S. is going through tough times right now, we will bounce back, the unemployment rate will come down and we’ll find ways to create jobs for everyone in society.
  • Short-term predictions: Right now, Buffett is focusing his closest attention on the housing market. He believes that when the housing market returns, we’ll see a broad range of industries related to housing or down the system from what housing creates. He thinks the housing market bouncing back is a lot closer than many of many people think.

See what else Ferguson had to say about his discussion with Buffett:

The current skills shortage — and why we should care

Ferguson said our current skill shortage is a longer-term issue that, though it won’t be changed overnight, must be addressed now.

As a result of a long and deep recession, technology evolution, and globalization, we’re in a position where we have a lot of jobs — and not enough workers with the right skills to fill them. “We have to re-skill a lot of Americans into new industries, and it’s not something that happens in 3 or 4 months — companies have to participate in it and government has to incent it. If we don’t start investing in it now, we’re going to look back 2 years from now and say, ‘I wish we’d started that,’” Ferguson said.

In industries like information technology, health care, and engineering, Ferguson pointed out that we’re seeing a mismatch in skills.  There are more job postings for some types of IT jobs this September than last, for example, but they’re staying open longer because there’s an undersupply of people in the U.S. who have the right skills for those jobs.

The key, Ferguson said, is to reskill people into various areas of those industries and help provide employment in the long term for them — but as he stressed, it will take all of us working together to do it. The positive news is that broad-based areas like customer service, marketing and sales are starting to make a comeback — a good leading indicator, Ferguson said, of the underlying health of the economy, and a sign that we may see better job creation as we move into 2012.

 

What do you see happening for U.S. economic recovery as we begin to prepare for 2012?

More Jobs Than Expected Added in September

October 7th, 2011 Comments off

From zero to 103,000 in 30 days…

What sounds like the tag line of a lame Nicolas Cage action movie (redundant?) actually describes the change in the number of jobs created since last month, according to the Bureau of Labor Statistics, which released September’s Employment Situation Report this morning.

Here’s a summary:

  • Nonfarm payroll employment increased by 103,000 in September; however, that number includes the return to payrolls of about 45,000 [Verizon] telecommunications workers who had been on strike in August.
  • The private sector added 137,000 jobs in September, with health care and education leading the growth, while local government shed 35,000 jobs, including 24,400 in public education.
  • The number of unemployed persons was relatively unchanged at 14 million and the unemployment rate held at 9.1 percent.
  • The number of long-term unemployed (those jobless for 27 weeks and over) was 6.2 million in September.
  • Since April, payroll employment has increased by an average of 72,000 per month, compared with an average of 161,000 for the prior seven months.

While it’s nice to see that jobs were actually added this month (and even surpassed economists’ predictions of around 55,000), 103,000 still falls far short of the around 200,000 jobs needed each month just to fuel growth.

But before I become too much of a Debbie Downer, I’ll just reiterate White House blogger Katherine Abraham’s advice to “not to read too much into any one monthly report.” Done and done, Katherine.

Related links:

More Jobs Than Expected Added in September

October 7th, 2011 Comments off

From zero to 103,000 in 30 days…

What sounds like the tag line of a lame Nicolas Cage action movie (redundant?) actually describes the change in the number of jobs created since last month, according to the Bureau of Labor Statistics, which released September’s Employment Situation Report this morning.

Here’s a summary:

  • Nonfarm payroll employment increased by 103,000 in September; however, that number includes the return to payrolls of about 45,000 [Verizon] telecommunications workers who had been on strike in August.
  • The private sector added 137,000 jobs in September, with health care and education leading the growth, while local government shed 35,000 jobs, including 24,400 in public education.
  • The number of unemployed persons was relatively unchanged at 14 million and the unemployment rate held at 9.1 percent.
  • The number of long-term unemployed (those jobless for 27 weeks and over) was 6.2 million in September.
  • Since April, payroll employment has increased by an average of 72,000 per month, compared with an average of 161,000 for the prior seven months.

While it’s nice to see that jobs were actually added this month (and even surpassed economists’ predictions of around 55,000), 103,000 still falls far short of the around 200,000 jobs needed each month just to fuel growth.

But before I become too much of a Debbie Downer, I’ll just reiterate White House blogger Katherine Abraham’s advice to “not to read too much into any one monthly report.” Done and done, Katherine.

Related links:

CareerBuilder CDO Talks Job Creation, Clinton Global Initiative

September 20th, 2011 Comments off


Today, CareerBuilder announced its commitment to the Clinton Global Initiative (CGI) Annual Meeting in New York, which brings together leaders from all over the world to devise and implement innovative solutions to some of the world’s most pressing challenges. The commitment is part of CareerBuilder’s ongoing effort to educate job seekers on where to find opportunities and put Americans back to work.

Hope Gurion, CareerBuilder’s Chief Development Officer, is going to be at the annual meeting this week to speak on behalf of CareerBuilder.  She recently answered a few questions for me about the mission and history of the CGI, CareerBuilder’s involvement in the initiative and what she hopes all of us can gain from this meeting.

Can you tell me a little bit about the Clinton Global Initiative?
President Bill Clinton established the Clinton Global Initiative (CGI) in 2005. Over the years, CGI Annual Meetings have brought together nearly 150 current and former heads of state, 18 Nobel Prize laureates, hundreds of leading CEOs, heads of foundations, major philanthropists, directors of the most effective nongovernmental organizations, and prominent members of the media. These CGI members have made nearly 2,000 commitments, which have already improved the lives of 300 million people in more than 180 countries. When fully funded and implemented, these commitments will be valued in excess of $63 billion.

What role does CareerBuilder play in the CGI?
CareerBuilder is a full member of CGI, and I represent the company at the numerous meetings throughout the year.  I actively participate on the “workforce development” committee, and this week I am in New York City for the annual meeting. The key focus area for the first day of the meeting is jobs, and I’m particularly looking forward to a healthy discussion around the opportunities to empower current and future workers with new skills.  This is an area where there is a lack of transparent and current data to inform both students and workers, and where we are focused to illuminate and inform people in making good choices that will provide them with income and opportunity.

What do you hope to accomplish by participating in the CGI?
CareerBuilder’s commitment provides CareerOneStop centers, sponsored by the U. S. Department of Labor, with complimentary access and usage of CareerBuilder’s online Supply & Demand Portal. The Supply & Demand Portal was designed to help employers zero in on the best markets to recruit hard-to-find talent as well as enable CareerBuilder to help job seekers discover occupations that are in high demand and hone skill sets for areas with great growth opportunities. CareerOneStop Center staff can use information from the portal to assist job seekers in the retraining and “re-skilling” they need for opportunities available today and in years to come. The commitment runs for 12 months starting on October 1, 2011 and offers a single annual license for CareerBuilder’s Supply & Demand Portal, available at no charge, to the 1,819 Comprehensive CareerOneStop centers and 1,095 Affiliate CareerOneStop centers across the U.S.

Want to know more about the Clinton Global Initiative? Follow @ClintonGlobal on Twitter or check out the CGI Facebook page for news and updates; visit live.clintonglobalinitiative.org to view and share session webcasts; or visit CGI’s Flickr page to see photos from the sessions.

 

President Obama’s Address to Congress: What Did You Think?

September 12th, 2011 Comments off
“Those of us here tonight can’t solve all our nation’s woes. Ultimately, our recovery will be driven not by Washington, but by our businesses, and our workers. But we can help. We can make a difference. There are steps we can take right now to improve people’s lives.”
 

The White HouseThese were some of President Obama’s words in his Presidential Address to Congress just a few days ago, as he stressed the need for Congress to pass the American Jobs Act. Many of us watched, or tweeted about it, or argued about it over dinner — and some of us, like CareerBuilder CEO Matt Ferguson, were discussing hopes for the speech to come before it happened.

The purpose of the American Jobs Act, President Obama said, is simple — “to put more people back to work and more money in the pockets of those who are working.” So what exactly did President Obama say to explain that would happen? I’ve recapped the highlights here of what Obama says the American Jobs Act will do if passed:

What President Obama says the American Jobs Act will do (in his own words):

  • Lead to new jobs for construction workers, for teachers, for veterans, for first responders, young people, and for the long-term unemployed.
  • Provide a tax break for companies who hire new workers or raise workers’ wages, and it will cut payroll taxes in half for every working American and every small business.
  • Provide a jolt to an economy that is stalled, and give companies confidence that if they invest and if they hire, there will be customers for their products and their services.
  • Cut payroll taxes cut in half next year for all small business owners. (If you have 50 employees making an average salary, that’s an $80,000 tax cut).
  • Repair and modernize at least 35,000 schools.
  • Put people to work right now fixing roofs, and windows, and installing science labs and high-speed Internet in classrooms all around this country.
  • Put thousands of teachers in every state back to work.
  • Give companies extra tax credits if they hire America’s veterans. As Obama explained, “We ask these men and women to leave their careers, leave their families, risk their lives to fight for our country. The last thing they should have to do is fight for a job when they come home.”
  • Give companies a $4,000 tax credit if they hire anyone who has spent more than six months looking for a job. President Obama: “We have to do more to help the long-term unemployed in their search for work.”
  • Extend unemployment insurance for another year.
  • Provide tax credits to companies that hire new workers, tax relief to small business owners, and tax cuts for the middle class.
  • Cut away the red tape that prevents start-ups from raising capital and going public

Other points of emphasis:

  • Obama stressed that we can’t grow the economy and create jobs by both keeping tax loopholes for all companies, and giving small business owners a tax credit when they hire new owners — we must choose.
  • He also acknowledged that the American Jobs Act addresses the urgent need to create jobs right away — but that we have to look more into the future and make a lasting impact in order to make America competitive “for the long haul.”
  • He wants to make sure the next generation of manufacturing takes place not in other countries, but here in the United States.
  • “The people who hired us to work for them — they don’t have the luxury of waiting 14 months (until the next election).” He mentioned, as we have before, that some people are living week to week, paycheck to paycheck, or day to day – they need our help, and they need it now.

Before he ended his speech, Obama brought up Abraham Lincoln, and talked about how, in the middle of a civil war, Lincoln was also a leader who looked to the future. He was a Republican president who was able to mobilize government, Obama pointed out — leaders of both parties followed the example he set. Obama’s message in this comparison was clear — now is not the time for politics, but for putting them aside to make changes necessary for a better economy. But how successful was he in his plea?

 

Watch President Obama’s Address to Congress in its entirety:

 

How do you think we can create more jobs and make long-term economic improvements?

For August’s Job Numbers Report, Please See July

September 2nd, 2011 Comments off

The employment situation report for August is disturbingly similar to that of July.

Zero: It’s not just the amount of interest you have in seeing the remake of Footloose. It’s also the number by which both nonfarm payroll and the unemployment rate changed in August, as reported by the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics today.

(Un-fun fact: Today marks the first time since 1945 that the government has reported a net monthly job change of zero. Most depressing. Record-setting. Ever.)

Employment numbers across the board showed little to no change last month, but in case you don’t feel like clicking over to July, here’s a summary of August’s employment situation report:

  • Total nonfarm payroll employment, at 131.1 million, was unchanged (0) in August. Employment changed little in most major private-sector industries.
  • The number of unemployed persons was relatively unchanged at 14 million and the unemployment rate held at 9.1 percent.
  • The labor force rose to 153.6 million.
  • The number of long-term unemployed (those jobless for 27 weeks and over) was about unchanged at 6 million.
  • The number of persons employed part time for economic reasons (sometimes referred to as involuntary part-time workers) rose from 8.4 million to 8.8 million in August.
  • The average workweek for all employees on private nonfarm payrolls edged down by 0.1 hour over the month to 34.2 hours.
  • In August, average hourly earnings for all employees on private nonfarm payrolls decreased by 3 cents, or 0.1 percent, to $23.09. This decline followed an 11-cent gain in July.
  • The change in total nonfarm payroll employment for June was revised from +46,000 to +20,000, and the change for July was revised from +117,000 to +85,000.

So, yeah. No change. No growth. No closer to buying that summer share in the Hamptons…This is usually the part where I try to be optimistic, but if “at least we didn’t lose jobs, y’all!” is the best thing I can say about this report…I’d rather go see Footloose.

OnStar, we have an emergency.

Categories: industry news Tags: ,

Have You Hired a Veteran Today?

August 26th, 2011 Comments off

Veteran employees bring unique skills sets to the workforce.

The holiday may be well over two months away, but really, is it ever too early to start preparing for it? I’m talking, of course, about Veterans Day.

Do you realize about one million military veterans today are unemployed? Hard to believe, considering the vast array of skills they possess, training they’ve gone through and discipline work ethic they demonstrate – all of which are valuable skills in any industry. So if you’re looking for suggestions on ways to acknowledge the upcoming holiday, you could start with focusing your recruiting efforts on this remarkable group of men and women.

But don’t take my word for it…

A 2009 CareerBuilder survey asked employers who have hired U.S. veterans or members of the National Guard to list the top attributes military personnel brought to their organization.

Survey participants cited the following valuable traits these employees possessed:

  • Disciplined approach to work (cited by 68 percent of employers surveyed)
  • Ability to work as part of a team (63 percent)
  • Respect and integrity (57 percent)
  • Leadership (50 percent)
  • Problem-solving skills (46 percent)
  • Ability to perform under pressure (44 percent)
  • Communication skills (37 percent)

A few other things you might want to know about hiring veterans: With an honorable discharge, service members are basically certified drug-free. And many military personnel have achieved some level of security clearance, demonstrating that an individual is recognized as a trustworthy person. It’s also possible that you could qualify for government-paid relocation services if hiring a military person coming off active duty from another location.

And now that President Obama has proposed a new tax credit for employers who hire veterans, there’s even more incentive to hire military service men and women.

But perhaps Obama articulated the greatest reason to hire veterans when –during a speech last month in Washington, D.C.’s Navy Yard – he said:

“Just think about how many veterans have led their comrades on life-and-death missions by the time they were 25 years old. That’s the kind of responsibility and experience that any business in America should want to take advantage of.”

To further help companies find employees with these valuable skill sets, CareerBuilder recently launched Employvets.com, dedicated to helping match employers and military personnel. Veterans and National Guard members can identify employers who are sensitive to their employment needs, while employers can benefit from targeting these uniquely skilled workers for their positions.

 

Survey: 60 Percent of Workers Laid Off in the Last Year Have Found New Jobs

August 25th, 2011 Comments off

Workers are finding jobsAccording to a recent CareerBuilder survey, 60 percent of workers who were laid off in the last year have found new jobs. Of that 60 percent, 88 percent found full-time positions, and 54 percent found jobs in entirely different fields than where they previously worked.

Among the workers who are still searching for new opportunities, 56 percent said they are nervous about returning to work after an extended period of unemployment, citing the following reasons:

  • Pressure to prove themselves (50 percent)
  • Fear of the unknown (40 percent)
  • Anxiety around new, unfamiliar technologies (21 percent)

The survey – which was conducted by Harris Interactive© from May 19 to June 8, 2011 and included more than 800 workers who were laid off from full-time jobs in the last year – also revealed the following workforce trends:

  • Relocation: Of workers who were laid off and found new jobs, 36 percent reported they relocated to a new city or state. Of those who haven’t found new jobs yet, 38 percent said they would consider relocating for a position.
  • Pay Increases: The majority of laid off workers who found new jobs reported their pay is similar to or higher than their previous position, with 45 percent taking a pay cut, (down from 47 percent last year), and 27 percent finding jobs with higher pay (up from 22 percent last year).
  • Starting Small Businesses: Some workers may replace their job search efforts with entrepreneurship. More than one-in-four (27 percent) who have not yet found work said they are considering starting their own business.

But while it’s encouraging to see more companies hiring laid off workers (especially in light of recent reports that some employers refuse to consider unemployed job seekers for their open positions), it’s also crucial that they keep this momentum going.

It’s important to recognize that every segment of the workforce brings unique skills and value to the workplace, and that excluding any segment of the population from your applicant pool only cheats you out of talent that could benefit your organization.

In a statement for the survey’s press release, Brent Rasmussen, president of CareerBuilder North America, discussed the significance of these findings and the need to keep hiring in this economy:

“We need to do a better job as a nation to help workers identify jobs that are in-demand today and are projected to grow in the future. We have a growing skills gap and the need to get millions of Americans back to work. As the economy recovers, we need to focus on retraining and ‘re-skilling’ workers to help them move to new fields with a greater number of opportunities.”

Not to mention that companies that invest in hiring and retaining currently unemployed workers not only qualify for certain government tax breaks and benefits as part of the HIRE Act, but they’re also helping the nation overall in contributing to economic recovery.

Have you recently hired a laid off worker? Any advice for your peers?

Post-Recession, What is the Current State of Worker Finances?

August 11th, 2011 Comments off

As many of us keep a close watch on the latest stock market news, CareerBuilder’s just-released survey on worker finances (PDF) shows the financial situation for some workers is actually improving (albeit slowly). Forty-two percent of workers in the survey of more than 5,200 workers say they usually or always live paycheck to paycheck, an improvement from 43 percent in 2010 and in line with levels seen back in 2007, pre-recession.

Personal Finance: Living Paycheck to Paycheck

Signs that workers’ finances are improving:

  • The number of workers who have missed a bill payment has decreased since 2010: 20 percent say they have missed payments on bills in the last year, a slight improvement from 22 percent at this time last year.
  • 14 percent of workers making six figures say they live paycheck to paycheck, down from 17 percent in 2010.
  • 6 percent of these six-figure earners said they can’t make ends meet every month — but that’s an improvement from the 8 percent who said the same last year.

Gender wars

It appears that, though both genders have their share of financial issues, female workers continue to struggle more with their personal finances than their male counterparts:

  • 46 percent of female workers say they live paycheck to paycheck, compared to 38 percent of male workers.
  • 24 percent of female workers say they have missed a bill payment over the last 12 months, higher than male workers at 17 percent.

 They work hard for the money (so don’t mess with their cable TV)

“The majority of U.S. workers (72 percent) reported they are more fiscally responsible since the recession and have made a variety of changes to their living and spending habits,” said Rosemary Haefner, Vice President of Human Resources at CareerBuilder.

And while being more fiscally responsible may mean giving up some material comforts, workers said they would absolutely not give up the following regardless of their financial concerns:

  • Internet connection – 56 percent
  • Driving – 46 percent
  • Mobile phone – 42 percent
  • Cable TV – 27 percent
  • Going out to eat – 11 percent

 

The future is now later

Although as shown above, workers may be loath to give up a night out at the newest restaurant in town, giving up money that’s not in hand yet is sometimes a little easier — so it shouldn’t come as a huge surprise that some workers are making ends meet by dipping into their long-term savings.

  • 21 percent of workers say they have reduced their 401(k) contributions and/or personal savings in the last year to get by.
  • Others aren’t contributing to long-term savings at all: One-third (34 percent) say they don’t participate in any 401(k), IRAs or retirement plan programs.
  • Nearly two in ten workers who make six figures have reduced their contributions to savings and 401(k) programs each month (17%) — and 9 percent don’t participate in a 401(k) program or other personal savings plan at all.

Consider the following tips to pass on to your employees (or to use yourself) to ride out the economic downturn and prepare for the future:

  • Channel your inner Sherlock Holmes – Look at your expenses under a microscope. Takeout coffee, restaurant lunches and other everyday expenses can make a dent in your checking account. Create a spreadsheet to analyze what you spend each month. Once you see where your money goes, you can more easily determine where to cut back.
  • Be like the squirrel – Put an amount away, even if it is small. Regardless of the amount, set aside money each month for your short and long-term savings. If you have trouble fitting savings into your budget (or remembering to do it at all), set up an automatic deposit into a savings account.
  • Show off your flair for the frugal – Savings may be right under your nose. Talk to your HR department about how you can make the most of your organization’s benefits. Find out if your company offers discounts for vendors like banks, gyms, or car rental services, and ask for additional resources to help you select the right benefits plans for your budget.

Need a recap? Get a snapshot of workers’ current financial situations.

July’s Job Numbers: The Sky Isn’t Falling! (But Don’t Put Away That Chicken Little Costume Yet)

August 5th, 2011 Comments off

July's Job Numbers: The Sky Isn't FallingIf you were betting on job numbers, and you bet that 18,000 new jobs were created last month, thinking we’d have a repeat of June, you’d be wrong. But it’s probably a bet you’d be happy to lose, because in July, we added 117,000 jobs, according to the Bureau of Labor Statistics’ “The Employment Situation” summary for July 2011. This jump followed two months of very little growth (in May and June).

Despite this growth and landing above Wall Street expectations, we’re still below the number needed to really make a dent in the unemployment rate — but it’s an improvement. So, the sky isn’t falling — and let’s just say we’re cautiously optimistic, yes?

Other details from this month’s “The Employment Situation” summary:

  • Net growth explanation: 154,000 jobs were created in the private sector, but with a loss in government jobs of 37,000, we saw a net increase of 117,000.
  • May and June’s low growth numbers have also had positive net revisions of  56,000.
  • The labor force, at 152.3 million, did not change much in July.
  • The unemployment rate was little changed but we did see improvement, from 9.2 to 9.1 percent. It’s important to keep in mind, however, that this lower rate was due to more individuals dropping out of the employment search (labor force participation fell from 64.1 percent to 63.9 percent).
  • Average hourly earnings for all employees on private nonfarm payrolls increased by 10 cents to $23.13. Over the past 12 months, average hourly earnings have increased by 2.3 percent.
  • Neither average weekly hours or the number of temporary employees rose; as The Economist points out, both are indicators of future labor demand.

Hiring by industry

We saw job gains in health care, retail trade, manufacturing, and mining. Specifically:

  • Health care employment grew by 31,000 in July. Ambulatory health care services and hospitals each added14,000 jobs over the month. Over the past 12 months, health care employment has grown by 299,000.
  • Retail trade added 26,000 jobs in July. Employment in health and personal care stores rose by 9,000 over the month with small increases distributed among several other retail industries.
  • Manufacturing employment increased by 24,000 in July; nearly all of the increase was in durable
    goods manufacturing. Within durable goods, the motor vehicles and parts industry had fewer seasonal
    layoffs than typical for July, contributing to a seasonally adjusted employment increase of 12,000 jobs.
  • Mining employment rose by 9,000; virtually all of the gain (+8,000) occurred in support activities for mining.
  • Professional and technical services continued to trend up in July, with a gain of 18,000 jobs.
  • Employment in construction, transportation and warehousing, information, leisure and hospitality, and financial activities changed little in July.
  • Government employment continued to trend down in July, with a loss of 37,000. Employment in state government decreased by 23,000, due almost entirely to a partial shutdown of the Minnesota state government.
  • Average hourly earnings for all employees on private nonfarm payrolls increased by 10 cents in July to $23.13. Over the past 12 months, average hourly earnings have increased by 2.3 percent. Average hourly earnings of private-sector production and nonsupervisory employees increased by 8 cents to $19.52.

See what CareerBuilder CEO Matt Ferguson had to say yesterday on CNBC’s Squawk Box program about job creation, the biggest skill shortage we’re facing right now, and more.

What do you think about July’s BLS job numbers?

Jobs in America: CareerBuilder CEO Talks Job Creation, the Biggest Skill Shortage and More

August 4th, 2011 Comments off

On CNBC’s Squawk Box this morning, CareerBuilder CEO Matt Ferguson discussed job expectations versus job creation; the disconnect caused by the structural mismatch between available jobs and available skills; the industry with the biggest skill shortage right now; and the area hottest in wage growth.

Check out what else Ferguson has to say about the state of jobs in America:

Small Businesses Move Slowly But Surely with Hiring Plans

July 26th, 2011 Comments off

CareerBuilder’s Small Business Job Forecast points to improved, but cautious hiring in the second half of 2011

In a move that should make John Legend and high school gym teachers everywhere feel validated, small businesses plan to take it slow in the second half of 2011.

When it comes to hiring plans, that is.

According to CareerBuilder’s nationwide survey of more than 1,400 small businesses, while small business hiring in the coming months is expected to be better than 2010, caution continues to steer the pace of job creation post-recession.

In a statement for the press release, CareerBuilder CEO Matt Ferguson discussed why small businesses remain hesitant in their hiring plans:

Right now there is a multi-speed labor market with smaller organizations slower to add new headcount. There was a chill effect on confidence levels coming out of the last recession and small businesses are still waiting to see how the market will unfold before committing to fully expanded staffs. Hiring in this segment will continue with modest gains in the second half of the year.

Following are the major findings from the Small Business 2011 Mid-Year Job Forecast: 

Full-time hiring up from last year: The number of small businesses planning to hire full-time, permanent employees from July through December rose six percentage points over last year, with larger companies hiring at a more accelerated pace.

  • Companies with 50 or fewer employees – 20 percent hiring full-time, permanent employees (up from 14 percent last year).
  • Companies with 500 or fewer employees – 27 percent hiring full-time, permanent employees (up from 21 percent last year).
  • Companies with more than 500 employees – 46 percent hiring full-time, permanent employees (up from 38 percent last year).

Part-time hiring plans remain relatively unchanged: Small businesses expect part-time hiring to be on par with last year. Larger organizations are slightly less likely to hire part-time workers than last year, focusing more on adding full-time staff.

  • 50 or fewer employees – 9 percent hiring part-time employees, same as 2010
  • 500 or fewer employees – 11 percent hiring part-time employees, same as 2010
  • More than 500 employees – 19 percent hiring part-time employees, down from 21 percent in 2010

Contract or temporary hiring up slightly: Companies of all sizes plan to increase their use of contract or temporary support to fill in employment gaps before turning up the dial on permanent placement.

  • 50 or fewer employees – 6 percent hiring contract or temporary employees, up from 4 percent last year
  • 500 or fewer employees – 8 percent hiring contract or temporary employees, up from 6 percent last year
  • More than 500 employees – 16 percent hiring contract or temporary employees, up from 13 percent last year

Customer service is in-demand: Similar to last year’s study, the functional areas for which small businesses plan to hire first are those on the front lines with customers and those driving innovation.

  • Customer Service, Information Technology and Sales remain in the top three spots for recruitment in the second half of 2011 with Administrative and Business Development rounding out the top five.

Burn-out, turnover and competition for talent among major areas of concern: Retaining and recruiting top talent has become a major challenge for small businesses as the economy improves and employers fight worker burnout.

  • 36 percent of small businesses believe their workers are already burned out.
  • 25 percent are worried that workers will leave their organizations as the economy improves
  • 10 percent say that top workers left their organizations in the second quarter
  • 18 percent currently have open positions for which they can’t find qualified candidates

For more information – and to see how your business compares – download the full report here.

Where Are the Workers? 7 Jobs That Need More Talent Now

July 13th, 2011 Comments off

Urgent need for workersIt’s the question on everyone’s mind (no, not “What are William and Kate talking about this very instant? or “Why did Michelle Obama eat a burger?“), but — where are the jobs? CareerBuilder’s just-released list, pulled from CareerBuilder’s Supply and Demand Portal data from the past six months, gives us some insight into just that.

The latest Supply and Demand Portal data reveals industries and positions where, for a multitude of reasons, there is a growing gap in the number of workers needed to fill job openings. We’ve already seen evidence that  47 percent of employers plan to hire full-time workers in the last six months of this year — and some U.S. regions are more promising more than others. By understanding the labor demand in particular markets and the ways in which talent pools grow or shrink depending on that demand, you can more effectively guide your recruitment strategy in terms of employment brand, compensation and overall advertising strategy.

CareerBuilder’s Supply and Demand Portal helps you be smarter by giving you real-time access to 1) the availability of active talent for any position (supply), and 2) where you will find the most and least competition for that talent (demand).

As CareerBuilder CEO Matt Ferguson says:

“The Supply & Demand portal enables employers to gain valuable market insights to develop more productive and cost-effective recruitment strategies. More than one-third of human resource managers we surveyed said they currently have positions for which they can’t find qualified candidates, a trend that continues to grow as the economy recovers and job prospects improve.  While the U.S. still has a very competitive job market, there are areas within technology, health care and other fields that have a growing deficit in talent.”

So, without further adieu, the hottest industries with growing demand for workers:

    1. Cloud Developer

      • Supply v. Demand: 0.32 active job seekers for every job opening (in other words, there are three open positions for every one available job seeker).
      • Average Salary: $100,000
      • What Gives? Career opportunities in this space have multiplied with the exponential growth of data and the corresponding need to store and manage it.  Demand will continue to grow as companies look to increase capacity and function without having to build new infrastructure.
    2. Business Intelligence Analyst

      • Supply v. Demand: 1.01 active job seekers for every job opening
      • Average Salary:  $98,000
      • What Gives? This hybrid position that combines technical know-how with business and market insights is becoming increasingly critical as companies place a greater emphasis on business analytics.  Companies are using the value they have in their existing data streams and warehouses to make smarter business decisions and create better tools for customers.
    3. Registered Nurse

      • Supply v. Demand: 0.38 active job seekers for every job opening
      • Average Salary: $65,000 
      • What Gives? A staple on lists of worker shortages, nursing is one of the most challenging areas for recruitment. In addition to a growing demand for healthcare services, enrollment in nursing schools is trending down due to a lack of nursing faculty.
    4. Quality Engineer

      • Supply v. Demand: 1.05 active job seekers for every job opening. 
      • Average Salary:  $68,000
      • What Gives? The manufacturing sector is making a comeback as the economy recovers and exports grow stronger to meet the needs of emerging markets.
    5. Truck Driver
      • Supply v Demand: 1.37 active job seekers for every job opening 
      • Average Salary:  $41,000
      • What Gives? While life on the road has distinct advantages, extended time away from home, long hours on your own and dealing with traffic are among challenges that can make these positions hard to fill.
    6. SEO Strategist

      • Supply v. Demand: 1.75 active job seekers for every job opening
      • Average Salary:  $70,000
      • What Gives? With high Internet penetration in markets across the globe, there is greater need for individuals who can bring more traffic to company websites by elevating their ranking in unpaid and paid search engine results pages.  Companies with a large Internet presence are bringing these skills in-house to build effective and relevant sites.
    7. Health Care Administrator

      • Supply v. Demand: 2.25 active job seekers for every job opening
      • Average Salary:  $88,000
      • What Gives? An aging population and more than 30 million newly insured Americans post-health care reform are fueling the need for more medical services and professionals who can keep operations flowing smoothly.

More about the data:

  • CareerBuilder’s Supply & Demand portal pulls data from national employment resources like CareerBuilder.com, Wanted Analytics and EMSI (Economic Modeling Specialists Inc.), accessing more than 45 million jobs, 40 million resumes and 140 million worker profiles.
  • Based on the number of available jobs and available candidates, the portal identifies occupations and corresponding markets with the greatest supply and under-supply of candidates.

You can check out the full report here.

 Is your company looking for employees in any of these fields — or where are you having a challenging time finding workers?

 

My, How Far We Haven’t Come: June’s Job Numbers

July 8th, 2011 Comments off

Before I go into today’s jobs numbers, can I just offer a word of advice to the economists out there?

Don’t play the lottery. Just don’t. You’re just not good at picking numbers lately.

Case in point? June’s Employment Situation Report, released this morning by the Bureau of Labor Statistics, which shows that the economy added only 18,000 jobs last month.

Now, it doesn’t take someone who tested out of college math (thankyouverymuch) to understand that 18,000 is quite a departure from the nearly 200,000 added jobs economists predicted would be added.

(I won’t even bring up how something very similar happened with last month’s projections.)

Here’s a summary of the June Employment Situation Report:

  • The U.S. economy added just 18,000 jobs in June, the fewest in eight months and far fewer than the 200,000 analysts originally anticipated.
  • Private employers added 57,000 jobs, while government agencies cut 39,000 jobs.
  • The unemployment rate increased from 9.1 percent to 9.2 percent, the highest it’s been since December.
  • The number of unemployed Americans in rose to 14.1 million in June from 13.9 million in May.

Also like last month, the government revised the previous month’s numbers to reflect that job growth was even slower than originally thought, with only 25,000 jobs added in May (down from the 54,000 jobs reported at the time).

And just to intensify that migraine point out exactly how bad these numbers actually are for hopes of ‘recovery’ (should we still be using that word?), remember that the economy needs to add 125,000 jobs a month just to keep up with the population growth.

So, yeah…Hard to believe it’s been two years since the recession ‘officially’ ended, huh? Doesn’t it seem like never ago?

Categories: industry news Tags: ,

CareerBuilder CEO Matt Ferguson Talks Market Trends, Job Improvement on Squawk Box

July 7th, 2011 Comments off

In anticipation of tomorrow’s BLS unemployment report, CareerBuilder’s CEO Matt Ferguson appeared on CNBC’s Squawk Box this morning to discuss job market trends; causes of current economic uncertainty; in which job areas we’re seeing the most improvement — and much more:

According to CareerBuilder’s Mid-Year Job Forecast:

  • Nearly half of U.S. employers (47 percent) plan to hire new employees in the second half of the year, up from 41% in 2010.  The number of companies hiring specifically for full-time, permanent staff rose to 35% from 28% last year.
  • Customer Service, Information Technology and Sales remain the top three areas where companies say they will hire first in the back half of the year.
  • More than one-third (35 percent) of employers are concerned that key talent will leave their organizations as the economy improves, a trend that has become increasingly evident over the last six months; 18% of employers reported top workers left their organizations in Q2 2011, up from 14 percent in Q1 2011.

What’s your take on the newest job forecast results and on what Matt had to say about the market?

Your Open Position as a Consumer Product: Do Job Seekers Want to Buy From You?

July 6th, 2011 Comments off

Will job seekers buy from you?Have you ever compared the experience job seekers go through when searching for a job to the experience you go through when, say, buying a car? Believe it or not, the two experiences are more closely linked than you may realize. We have specific reasons for deciding to go through with a car purchase — or walk away from it — and the same is true for job seekers considering your company as a future employer in their job search process.

The experience you provide job seekers through your recruitment process is something they will evaluate, engage with, and accept or reject, ultimately deciding whether or not to “make a purchase.” A new CareerBuilder and Inavero study of more than 4,500 workers demonstrates that that decision can happen at any point in the job search process, from the time they first start thinking about searching for a new job to the moment they have your offer letter in front of them — and everywhere in between.

The job seeker/employer relationship: It’s complicated

Today’s job search experience looks drastically different from several years or even several months ago, and it continues to evolve. Now, although job boards still have a prominent place in the job search, the job search experience has become much more complex. When job seekers embark on a job search, they are actively using five specific methods to find their next job: Search engines; vertical sites (job boards and aggregators); social media; corporate and career sites; and user-generated content sites. They are using these five platforms in different ways and with varied intensity as they move through four distinct phases of the job search — Orientation, Consideration, Action, and Engagement.

To effectively build and manage your company’s employment brand, reach a large segment of the many job seekers you’re missing out on, and continue to position yourself as a visible and desirable place to work in today’s rapidly changing world, you must have a diversified recruitment strategy that incorporates these five platforms — and you must understand the mindset and behavior of job seekers as they move through the four stages of the job search process.

Job seekers have changed — have you?

The CareerBuilder and Inavero study takes you through a job seeker’s typical job search experience as it happens in today’s recruitment environment, a time in which job seekers are hungry for information and have a wealth of online resources at their fingertips. Long gone are the days of faxing or mailing a resume and simply waiting passively to hear back from an employer — today’s job seeker is much more hands-on.

Actions job seekers take in initial job search

By learning what job seekers are thinking and doing as they move through four distinct job search phases (Orientation, Consideration, Action, and Engagement) and crafting your strategy to align with those thoughts and behaviors, you’ll be equipped to reach the best candidates for your open jobs, position yourself as a strong and desirable brand, and ensure your approach is consistent from phase to phase.

The Four Phases of the Job Search

Phase I: Orientation — This phase consists of a job seeker’s self-evaluation and evaluation of the market. Ninety-seven percent of job seekers reported self-evaluation as one of the first five things they did when starting a search.

Phase II: Consideration – During this phase, the job search moves from a solitary to an interactive, social experience. Job seekers are seeking to validate the brands in their consideration set by posting on social media platforms and user-generated content sites, and collecting opinions from members of their online social and professional networks in order to narrow their focus to a handful of jobs.

Phase III: In this phase, a job seeker is going through the action of applying to jobs.

Phase IV: In this last phase, job seekers are interacting with employers and actively interviewing. Although the majority of research on a company is completed pre-interview, job seekers are conducting social research in this last phase by having personal conversations with employees of your company or close family and friends.

(Learn about the job seekers’ mindset and behavior during each of the four job search phases here.)

The importance of a great recruitment experience

Job seekers today are largely dissatisfied with the current hiring process offered by companies. Only 10 percent of respondents said companies they have reached out to have been responsive. The impact of this is immense: Nearly half (40 percent) of job seekers strongly agree that a poor application experience impacts their job decision. In fact, it might surprise you to find out that more than one in 10 people turn down a job at least once a month.

The impact of a good or bad job seeker experience

Bad experiences during and after the application process can easily negate the work and strategic investment in media you’ve made to bring the best talent onto your team.

Begin to create a more candidate-centric recruitment process by adding a human touch:

  • Communicate with candidates when at all possible, and let them know where they stand as the process moves from phase to phase.
  • Unplug cumbersome technology and flawed screening filters, and provide feedback and coaching.
  • View all candidates as a customer or potential future customer, client or employee.
  • Get the most out of the resources you’re investing by being responsive — in the long run, you will get better quality talent, protect your employment brand, and maintain a better reputation with clients (who once may have been your candidates).

Getting them to say “yes”

Job seekers are using a wide range of methods to find the right jobs, and by gaining a large presence through these methods, you will deepen your talent pool, engage and create trust with candidates early on, find more diverse candidates for your open positions, and, ultimately, improve your bottom line. Start thinking of your recruitment experience as a consumer product — and start
getting more job seekers to consider your brand, like what they see, and say “Yes.”

For details on job seeker behavior and mindset within the four job search phases and our recommended strategies for best connecting with job seekers at each point in the process, download the full report or learn more about adding the right platforms to your recruitment mix.

 

Hope Gurion’s Six Tips to Help Overworked Moms Thrive

May 5th, 2011 Comments off

Hope GurionChoosy moms choose — work? Or family? That’s the struggle many working moms are facing, as many working moms say they’re having trouble finding the time to both support their families financially and be home with their families.

Although the economy has made significant improvements since we talked with CareerBuilder’s Mary Delaney about working moms one year ago, many families are still surviving on just one working parent; more than one-third (35 percent) of working moms and 44 percent of working dads surveyed by CareerBuilder said they are the sole financial provider for their household.

In addition to the fact that one parent is often trying to be the sole provider financially while also being physically and emotionally there for their family, the burden may be even heavier for women, more of whom reported they earned a low salary than did male respondents.

Just how much lower of a salary?

Comparing these two groups, working moms who were the sole provider were three times as likely to earn less than $35,000 (45 percent of moms compared to 15 percent of dads), while working dads were more than twice as likely to earn $50,000 or more (63 percent of dads versus 28 percent of moms) and nearly three times as likely to earn six figures (18 percent of dads compared to 7 percent of moms), according to the 2011 CareerBuilder Mother’s Day survey. The survey was conducted among 484 working moms and 836 working dads, employed full-time, with children 18 and under living in the household.

Quality — but not quantity

Working moms are still facing less quality time at home due to financial challenges, heavier workloads and longer hours in the office — and despite an improving economy, this reality has actually worsened. One quarter of all working moms said they spend two hours or less with their children each work day, up from 18 percent in 2010.  Twenty-four percent take work home at least once a week.

Workers want employer support

Many workers are on the search to find that perfect work/life balance — and for working parents, it’s top priority. Despite any existing financial struggles, 31 percent of all working moms said they would take a job with less pay if it meant they could spend more time with their children.

For employers, that’s a statistic worth paying attention to. Working moms want flexible options to help them spend more time with their families — and in an environment when many of them are working with less pay, longer hours and extremely heavy workloads, consider the benefits to both them and your organization that more balance in their lives could bring. Happier employees who feel that their needs are valued in an organization are more likely to want to stay with your company and contribute in the long run.

“While all indications point to economic recovery, working moms are still waiting to feel the effects,” said Hope Gurion, Chief Development Officer at CareerBuilder and mother of two. “However, these moms possess a great deal of resourcefulness and resilience and continue to provide for their families.  While moms say they would give up things, including pay, to spend more time with their children, they are making the most of the time they do have and getting creative in work arrangements.”

Gurion recommends the following tips for working moms who are overworked:

  1. Talk to other moms – Many families are in the same boat as you, and having a support network is essential to your personal and professional sanity. Get tips from other working moms on how they juggle personal and professional commitments, how they’ve managed through difficult financial situations and how they’ve moved ahead in their careers.
  2. Keep an “I’m Fabulous” file – Keep track of all of your accomplishments within the organization, quantifying results whenever possible, and list out the additional responsibilities you have taken on in the last year.  It helps you to build your case when negotiating for a better salary or consideration for promotion with your employer.
  3. Go in with a game plan – The vast majority of working moms who have taken advantage of flexible work arrangements said it hasn’t negatively impacted their careers, so talk to your supervisor or HR department and explore options. Make sure to come to that conversation with a game plan on how you can manage workload and cover responsibilities.
  4. Get organized – Structure in your life will save you time, stress and mental energy. Keep one calendar for business and family commitments to avoid double-booking. Set up a schedule for chores, homework, family activities, playtime, and other family commitments.
  5. Remember quality over quantity – Make the most of your personal time. When you’re home, it’s all about them. Wait until after the children go to bed before checking email or finishing up that presentation.
  6. Schedule “me time” – Working moms need to take care of themselves too. Put actual time on the calendar for an hour or more of doing something you enjoy like going to the gym, taking a walk, or reading.

Don’t worry, working dads — though this survey focused on working moms, we’ve got you covered. Check out our five tips to help fathers better balance their work and family lives for some great ideas on de-stressing and re-focusing. And, really, many of the tips above apply to working parents in general, not just mothers — so they may also help you formulate the game plan you need moving forward.

Employers, have you been helping working parents achieve more of a work/life balance? If so, how?

 

Earth Day 2011: Working Toward a More Conscious Company

April 22nd, 2011 Comments off

Earth Day 2011: Toward a More Conscious CompanyAs many of you are likely aware, today is the 41st anniversary of Earth Day (I know, doesn’t it feel like just yesterday that we were celebrating its 40th?).  Around the world, people are celebrating and raising awareness of Earth Day’s mission by taking part in everything from clean air and water projects, to bike rides as they ditch their cars, to sending text messages like “TREE” to donate to green causes. This year, 1 billion people are expected to participate in various activities toward making the planet a little bit greener. The goal of this year’s theme, “A Billion Acts of Green,” is to generate a billion acts of environmental service and advocacy before the global Earth Summit 2012 in Rio.

What are business doing to take part?

It’s not only good for the Earth for businesses to take part in Earth Day 2011 — it’s smart for recruitment. Job seekers are increasingly seeking out employment with environmentally responsible companies, and many companies are paying attention. As we reported last year, many companies are continuing to add “green,” or environmentally-focused, positions, and the trend doesn’t appear to be stopping anytime soon. According to recent data pulled from CareerBuilder’s Supply and Demand Portal, jobs like “environmental engineer” are in high demand. In addition, green jobs are expected to grow at the rate of a whopping 1.3 million jobs per year through 2030, and federal, state and private funding is fueling openings for those able to develop solutions for pollution control, recycling, waste management and other public health initiatives.

Greenbiz.com’s Tilde Herrera talked with executives to find out what they’re doing today — or planning for this year — to take part in Earth Day. Answers included such diverse activities as nature walks, dumpster dives, plant-a-tree kit giveaways, and bike donations. Michael Kobori, VP of social and environmental sustainability at Levi Strauss & Co., says the company is piloting a sample fabrics recycling program, as well as partnering with Goodwill to donate wearable apparel during the design process. And Gerri Walsh, director of sustainability at Ball Corporation, says the company will hold a sustainability fair, complete with interactive booths and an electronic recycler for employees to donate old electronics.

The tech sector is also celebrating Earth Day. Facebook’s “Billion Acts of Green” app enables users to choose activities like sending a letter to Congress to support green legislation, getting a home energy audit, or planting a garden, and Sprint has just released its first Android phone, the Replenish (to add to its collection of three other eco-friendly phones), built with recycled materials and energy-efficient operation in mind. Earlier this week, Sprint also launched its Green ID set of applications for Android users, which bundles a green-themed news feeds, recycling tips, personal carbon footprint trackers and more.

Still other companies are celebrating Earth Day (or even Earth Month) with some initiatives that are a little bit different. Old Navy and TerraCycle, for example, are partnering for a “flip-flops replay” in which people are encouraged to turn in old flip-flops to be melted down and used in playgrounds across the country, and health care company Merck, in addition to other initiatives like recently installed solar panels, is offering financial incentives to employees who conduct an energy audit at home and set up a carpooling guide.

How are you celebrating Earth Day 2011?

What is your company doing to take part in Earth Day today — or what has your business done recently to become more environmentally friendly? What kind of an impact is it having on your business and on your employees?

If you are looking for ideas of service projects in your local area, check out the official Earth Day 2011 site. And if you’re looking for a fantastic light show, check out tonight’s Lyrid meteor shower.

How Has the Recession Shaped Career Attitudes of Millennials?

April 19th, 2011 Comments off

Meet the Post-Recession MillennialIt’s dangerous — and often inaccurate — to generalize generations’ workplace preferences and behaviors. Many hiring managers, however, are still clinging onto generational stereotypes, particularly of the oft much-hyped Millennial generation (those workers born between 1980 – 1995) — stereotypes that Millennials themselves have moved well beyond since first entering the workplace in the last several years.

In How the Recession Shaped Millenial and Hiring Manager Attitudes about Millenials’ Future Careers, Alexandra Levit and I examine various research initiatives to determine how the attitudes of Millennials toward their career paths have changed as a result of the economic downturn, how these attitudes compare to the way hiring managers view Millennials’ career paths, and what hiring managers can do to better understand this generation of workers. Many of our report conclusions have been drawn from The Future of Millennial Careers research study, which was commissioned by the Career Advisory Board, presented by DeVry University, and conducted by Harris Interactive among 500 Millennials age 21-31 either employed or planning to seek employment, and 523 hiring managers age 18+ who interact with Millennials at work.

While Millennials and hiring managers can generally both agree that Millennials tend to have certain commonalities, like digital comfort and impatience with certain established processes, there is also much disparity between how Millennials view themselves and how they are viewed by their bosses. This can result in a frustrating situation for both parties — but by learning to truly understand Millennials, hiring managers can create a smoother workplace environment for the multiple generations currently working within it, as well as improve one-on-one relationships with their valuable Millennial workers.

Pre-recession to the present

The oldest Millennials blazed into the workplace in the early 2000s, many of them unabashedly demanding flexibility, seamless communication and desirable assignments right away — and from this, many employers formed their opinions on Millennials right then and haven’t since wavered. However, the recession appears to have caused a shift in Millennials’ attitudes toward achieving immediate career success, as watching hiring freezes and mass layoffs occur, or being affected by them themselves, caused many Millennials to recognize that having a good job was not just a given, but instead something that must be earned. Now, as the economy is picking itself back up post-recession, Millennials have a much different idea of what they need to do to succeed, and more of them are taking the initiative to prove their worth to employers on a daily basis while honing their soft skills in the long term.

Millennials and hiring managers: Different worlds?

While the recession appears to have pushed many Millennials to form more realistic expectations about career advancement, many hiring managers don’t yet see a change in Millennials’ expectations and are still of the belief that Millennials are driven by unreasonably high pay in return for minimal effort. Many hiring managers remain very cynical of the efforts Millennials are making, and believe that this generation continues to have a sense of entitlement and unrealistic expectations of their own career growth and success.

Millennials also believe doing work that is personally meaningful to them and achieving a sense of accomplishment are just as important as earning a high salary for a successful career. In fact, 30 percent of Millennials identify meaningful work as the single most important measure of a successful career. Millennials are also feeling a need to pursue higher education, obtain transferable skills, and hold a variety of jobs in order to get ahead in their careers. Mistakenly, however, hiring managers commonly believe Millennials’ desire to earn a high salary primarily drives their job and career decisions. Forty-eight percent of hiring managers rank high pay as the number one way Millennials measure their career success. In contrast, only 11 percent of hiring managers say Millennials consider meaningful work as the number one measure of success.

Let’s take a closer look:

Disparity in Education

Millennials: Seventy-nine percent of Millennials responded that they had completed at least some college to date, and 65 percent ranked education among their top three preparation activities for getting ahead in the workplace (40 percent of all Millennial respondents ranked “getting the proper education” as the most important choice they could make to prepare for future careers).
Hiring Managers: Meanwhile, only 28 percent of hiring managers cited “getting the proper education” as the most important method for future success (though 55 percent did place it in the top three). Preferable to education was “learning transferable skills” — 62 percent of hiring managers listed this as one of the top three steps Millennials can take today to prepare for the next 15 years. Nearly two in five hiring managers (39 percent) said “setting goals with managers” should be in the top three.

Why? With the passing years, more and more young people are getting advanced degrees. Because managers used means other than getting higher degrees to get ahead in the workplace themselves, however, they may not view education as a key step for Millennials to advance their own careers. And, as managers have more work experience than Millennials, they are able to view the career path from a different perspective as far as ways to achieve workplace success.

Tips for managers: Investigate the learning opportunities available to your employees and make specific recommendations as part of each individual’s development plan. Help your employees set realistic and achievable goals for their future, and provide a path for building transferable skills in their daily roles that makes sense to both you and them.

 

Disparity in Millennials’ career motivations

Millennials: Millennials equate a successful career with doing meaningful work; in fact, 71 percent reported this as among the three most important factors defining career success. Nearly a third (30 percent) believed it was the most critical factor.

Hiring Managers: Only 11 percent of managers reported that meaningful work was the most important factor contributing to Millennial success, while almost one-half (48 percent) of managers said high pay was in fact the most critical factor in defining career success.

Why? Older generations grew up in a different time, when work rules were defined and enforced by the employer, and the primary purpose of work was to provide a paycheck, not to feed the well-rounded employee who increasingly struggles with work/life balance in a technology-driven world. Though pay is still important to many employees, work expectations have shifted over the years as our culture has evolved, and employees want different things from their “work life.”

Tips for managers: Match your Millennial employees with a mentor who is able to help guide their career path and offer advice along the way. In addition, be open to your workers’ proposals to create a work environment that is meaningful to them and enables them to do their best work, such as telecommuting or flexible scheduling, if they have presented clear advantages to the organization in saving time and money and effectively addressed any concerns you may have. In the long run, it may result in a situation beneficial to both your organization and your employee.

Key challenges for Millennials

Millennials are currently faced with two key challenges:

  1. They must overcome the pervasive stereotypes managers have about their generation.
  2. They must identify and address areas that impact their ability to work effectively in the professional world.

As older generations tend to hold opinions of Millennial employees that sharply diverge from the attitudes Millennials have about themselves, it’s important for managers to work with the various generations in their workplace to set a positive example and work to increase understanding of this generation. While research showed us that Millennials and their managers agreed that compared to older generations, Millennials are more likely to exhibit an inability to receive criticism as well as ineffective communication skills, these weaknesses must be viewed as a learning opportunity for both parties.

Moving forward, together

Millennials and their managers have come a long way in understanding one another – though there’s still a long road ahead. That road, however, is more quickly paved by each group doing their part to move forward and understand the other.

Millennials, for example, must be proactive in seeking mentorship from senior leaders, setting goals with their managers, and participating in company-sponsored training opportunities.

In addition to the tips mentioned above,  managers can also start taking steps to better understand and effectively work with Millennials:

  • Give timely and constructive feedback.
  • Keep an open mind and learn from young professionals.
  • Teach by example to set expectations.
  • Implement two types of training into your organization: The first, a session or course on inter-generational dynamics that provides Millennials and their managers with concrete strategies to build a better sense of community within their teams. The second, soft-skill training provided by the organization for Millennial hires that includes instruction on 1) assimilating into a new workplace culture; 2) working with team members assertively and diplomatically and how to receive and process feedback; and 3) approaching a supervisor to seek mentorship and set long-term career goals. This type of course would also help Millennials combat misperceptions about their generation and teach them strategies (like reverse mentoring) that use their digital comfort, ability to multi-task, and multiple other strengths in a positive way.

As managers become more open and tolerant, and Millennials continue to adjust their expectations and make visible and appreciated contributions to organizations, we will continue to see a wider understanding of the Millennials generation – as well as the great additions they can make to a rapidly changing work landscape.

Read the full report here for more statistics, thoughts from both Millennials and managers, and advice on managing the Millennial generation, or listen to my recent discussion with Lisa Johnson Mandell.

 

About The Career Advisory Board
Established in 2010 by DeVry University, the Career Advisory Board is a panel of leading career experts and authors from business and academia who provide actionable advice for job-seekers. The Career Advisory Board generates proprietary research and commentary, and creates tools, insight and resources to prepare job-seekers for success. Its members include executives from CareerBuilder, Cisco, DeVry University, Hewlett-Packard, IBM and Microsoft Corporation as well as nationally recognized career experts.

 

 

 

Fewer Workers Plan to Blow Their Tax Refunds This Year

April 12th, 2011 Comments off

If there’s anything more exciting than talking about tax refunds, it’s talking about data about tax refunds.

Exciting, of course, being a relative term here.

With Tax Day just a few days away, CareerBuilder released its annual survey on how workers plan to spend their tax refunds. But what’s cool(again, speaking relatively here…) about this year’s survey is that the results support growing evidence that the economy is on the upswing.

Compared to last year, fewer workers plan to use their tax refunds to pay off bills and more plan to put the money into savings, reflecting a more stable economy.

According to the survey over 3,900 workers nationwide, 46 percent plan to use their tax refunds to pay off bills, down from 56 percent last year. In addition, more than one-third (36 percent) of workers report they will use their tax refund to augment their savings accounts, up from 34 percent who said the same last year.

And while 61 percent of workers still report living paycheck to paycheck, the number is a significant improvement over the 77 percent who said the same last year.  In addition, 79 percent of workers said they haven’t reduced their 401 (k) accounts or personal savings in the last year.

While the majority of workers will use their tax refunds to put into savings or pay off bills, others plan to use their refunds toward things like making home improvements, going on vacation, buying a car, planning a wedding or donating to charity. To see the full press release, go here.

How do you plan to spend your tax refund?

Categories: industry news Tags: ,

Recruitment Trends: What Else Will We See in 2011?

April 4th, 2011 Comments off

Man looking through telescope for recruitment trendsShane Creamer and Simon Parkin of Granite Consulting, a recruitment consulting firm based in Canada, spoke at February’s HRPA 2011 conference, Canada’s conference and trade show focusing on HR issues and trends, about 10 recruitment trends businesses can expect as 2011 progresses. So, what, according to Creamer and Parkin, will many businesses, particularly in the U.S. and Canada, see more of as this year continues?

Labor Market Trends

Creamer and Parkin started by sharing their observations on labor market trends in Canada. Canada currently has a 7.8 percent unemployment rate, and they discussed the effects of an aging population on a constantly changing workplace (something U.S. businesses can identify with as well); over 50 percent of the Canadian workforce is 40 years old.

We know companies are hiring again; as Creamer and Parkin put it, “the ice is coming off the market” and the economy has gained back jobs lost in the recession. As we’ve discussed here on The Hiring Site, employee morale should not be a trend, and the recession has made many candidates and workers less loyal and trusting of employers. Many employees, Creamer and Parkin said, are continuing to feel uncomfortable with their current employers, but aren’t willing to trust any new organizations recruiting them.

Among other things, companies will have to focus more on the retention of their own talent (as highlighted in the latest hiring forecast, many workers are already looking for greener pastures), and there will be a shift away from traditional career paths and work values as the generational differences in the workplace become more pronounced.

So, what else is ahead for 2011?

Top 10 Recruitment Trends of 2011

#10   Talent becomes more mobile in a stronger economy:
“More mobile” doesn’t equate to more workers using smartphones to look for jobs (though indeed more are) — no, it means more of your employees will be moving to other companies. As more new positions are created this year, companies will experience higher turnover (as mentioned above) and will have to recruit to backfill that lost talent. We will see more candidates countering or turning down offers as the competition for talent continues to heat up. It’s important for employers to remember that, in or out of a recession, top talent will always have job options.

Companies don’t necessarily have the luxury of time as they might think they do; candidates (or even their own employees) are out there talking to other companies all the time. Are you keeping the retaining and recruiting of your talent top of mind?

#9 Recruitment In-sourcing vs. RPO:
This trend is toward selective, not full, recruitment process outsourcing. We will see outsourcing occur more often in the recruitment of high-volume, repetitive roles, and for the function of candidate sourcing only. There will be more RPO growth in the U.S. than Canada; more Canadian markets are focused on building internally. More executive recruitment functions are moving in-house, which is reflective of a growing transparency in the market. Increasingly, candidates can go online and see for themselves who holds which recruiting or leadership positions at a company,for example, rather than being forced to stay in the dark or play the guessing game to get in contact with the correct person.

#8  Gen Y Recruitment:
Gen Y recruitment is nothing new — but it’s evolving. You’ve likely read at least a handful of blog posts or articles lamenting the impact of Gen Y on the workplace or pigeonholing members of Gen Y into a defined set of characteristics. And this knee-jerk reaction isn’t terribly surprising, as employers are simply struggling to figure out how to make so many contrasting generations work harmoniously together in the workplace. But as Creamer and Parkin point out, it’s not fair to restrict this generation of workers into the whole “this is what Gen Y’s about” bucket. Just like members of other generations generally have some commonalities based on the society and culture they’re grown up with, you can’t necessarily throw them all into a bucket with a clear label. It’s important that employers remember people in Gen Y are not all the same, either.

So what general observations can be made about Gen Y workers?

  • Gen Y members were raised in a technologically sophisticated and stimulating environment and they’re generally accustomed to instant gratification.
  • Gen Y workers likely bring distinct values and expectations of what relationships with employers, managers and the workplace should be like.
  • These workers face rising tuition costs and escalating personal debt.
  • Nearly a third of Gen Y members have a blog, and they share intimately with their online networks.

Speaking of blogging, the job search experience has become increasingly social, and it’s not uncommon for candidates to blog about their experiences with a company during the interview process. The thoughts on a company, positive or negative, once online, can be extremely powerful. Companies must be aware that individuals have the opportunity to broadcast their experiences to a very wide audience, and that that message has the ability to spread very quickly. Negative company sentiment can spread very rapidly, but the impact can be very long-term. Tread carefully and

Recruit Gen Y candidates by using the right key messages and proper mediums:

  • A company can no longer tell candidates “work hard and the rewards will come” – Gen Y wants a more definitive timetable tied directly to specific rewards.
  • The traditional corporate recruitment promise of a long-term career isn’t as much of a selling point to this age group, so focus on the growth opportunities you can offer them.
  • This generation tends to be largely peer influenced. Have current Gen Y employees out there on the front lines of your recruitment efforts, leading the information and interview sessions with your candidates.

Employers are smart to learn more about Gen Y, but to keep an open mind about what they find. Gen Yers bring a lot to the table; learn how to view their differences as strengths for your business — and don’t assume that one experience with a candidate or employee is indicative of the behavior of an entire generation and let it dictate your recruitment process.

#7 Talent Management:
Twenty-five percent of new hires regret taking their new job within first year, according to a study by Deloitte. There is a larger focus on talent management as we move through 2011, as well as on internal talent movement. Many companies are focusing on building talent versus buying talent, and talent retention is also of course top of mind for many employers.

#6 – Growth of Contingent Labor in Canada:
In 2010, more than 1 million Canadians held contract roles for an organization. Now, one in every eight positions in Canada are contract or temporary. Canadian organizations are beginning to build an effective talent strategy around contract labor.

#5 – Talent Pipelining:
We’ve spoken at length about the importance of building a talent pipeline (and here and here), as it helps employers get more return out of their recruitment efforts using the fewest resources, build a stronger employment brand, and create better relationships with candidates. As Parkin and Creamer stressed during their presentation, talent pipelining needs to be built into the recruitment process for key roles, as the push of relevant content and information to “nurtured” candidates helps build a company’s employment brand and increase passive candidates’ engagement and trust. The emergence of candidate sourcing/research teams is also an increasing trend.

Creamer and Parkin add that many companies are also looking beyond the typical ATS to customer relationship management platforms (CRMs).

#4 – The Globalization of Recruitment:
I recently wrote about global HR trends for 2011, and as Creamer and Parkin discussed during their presentation, recruitment no longer has a solely local focus. Companies are looking internationally for new talent pools and hard-to-find skill sets. With this change comes adjustments to vastly different cultures and multiple languages — something that many companies are still sorting out. In a nutshell, recruitment is getting much more complicated and specialized.

#3 – Candidate-Centric Recruitment Process:
It’s no secret that many candidates are dissatisfied with the current hiring process offered by companies. As Creamer and Parkin joke, it’s as if employers are sending the message, Dear Mr./Mrs. Candidate. Thank you for taking two hours out of your busy life to apply to us online. Your resume has been sent to a virtual black hole, and no one from our company will ever verify that you actually exist. Expect never to hear from us.

As we’ve stressed in the past, treat candidates like you would a client or customer — in a very real sense, they are your customer (and down the line, they may in fact be in a position to do business with you). They also have a large network of friends and colleagues who will likely hear about their experience with your organization. And while you may have to let them down, letting them down is better than not responding to candidates at all.

A poor or lengthy recruiting process can really hurt your organization’s chances of bringing the best talent onto your team. Just as candidates must sell themselves to you, you must sell your company to candidates. What’s your employment value proposition; how are you attracting, engaging, and retaining quality talent?

Begin to create a more candidate-centric recruitment process by adding more of a “human touch” to your process. Communicate with candidates when at all possible, and let them know where they stand as the process moves from phase to phase. Unplug cumbersome technology and flawed screening filters, and provide feedback and coaching. View all candidates as a customer or potential future customer, client or employee.

#2: Social Media for Recruitment:
Social media: It can be really overwhelming. Most of us are familiar with the major social media platforms — and they are playing an increasing role in recruitment as companies realize they must diversify their recruitment efforts to stay on top. Mobile technology is emerging as a recruitment channel, as companies are also realizing the power of texting and mobile apps for recruitment. Even location-based social networking sites like Foursquare have growing possibilities for businesses and recruitment. Tablets like the iPad are also becoming more popular for work use as these devices increase the business applications offered, and companies are beginning to examine the power of tablet applications to help strengthen their employment brand and company profile.

Video interviewing is a trend that more and more businesses (and candidates) are starting to pick up on, and platforms like Skype, the largest network on the Internet, are also becoming more popular for use in interviews or for virtual meetings.

As Creamer and Parkin remind us, social media is just another factor in your recruitment success — it’s not the be-all, end-all answer. Using these mediums can be powerful — but the content you put out and the messages you are sending to candidates and employees must be relevant.

#1 — The Demand for Experienced Recruiters:
Recruiters today are being asked to do more with less, making it increasingly difficult for them to be successful. The demand for experienced recruiters is high — and the recruiter of yesterday has changed to reflect a demand for those who have an in-depth knowledge of the company for which they’re recruiting. “Generalist” has morphed into “Specialist,” “Administrator/Processor” into “Trusted Advisor/Consultant,” and “Gut Feeling” decisions to “Results/Metrics-Driven” ones. Successful recruiters are getting closer to the business and doing a lot of leg work to get results.

 

Let us know — What recruitment trends listed here are you seeing in your own business?

Where’s the Talent? 10 Industries With Growing Worker Demand

March 14th, 2011 Comments off

Pointed finger indicating job growthAre you keeping up with talent supply and demand in your market? As the most recent BLS Employment Situation Report revealed, 192,000 jobs were added in February 2011 — but how many candidates are applying to those 192,000 jobs? By understanding the labor demand in particular markets and the ways in which talent pools grow or shrink depending on that demand, you can more effectively guide your recruitment strategy in terms of employment brand, compensation and overall advertising strategy.

CareerBuilder’s Supply and Demand Portal helps you be smarter by giving you real-time access to 1) the availability of active talent for any position (supply), and 2) where you will find the most and least competition for that talent (demand).

The following information from Supply and Demand Portal shows examples of hot industries where there is a growing demand in the number of workers needed to fill job openings, based on data from the last six months.

1)      Nurse Practitioner: .23 active job seekers for every position
This year, the first wave of more than 70 million baby boomers will turn 65 and join Medicare – equating to approximately one every eight seconds. At the same time, there are more than 30 million newly insured Americans as a result of health care reform, driving the need for more medical services. Couple this with an increase in retail health clinics and a deficit in primary-care physicians, and you’ve got a huge need for nurse practitioners to help fill the gap.

2)      Database Administrator:  .26 active job seekers for every position
From the explosion of sites like Twitter and Facebook, to the evolution of the smartphone’s presence in both our home and work lives, the world’s dependence on sophisticated technology is getting more prevalent every day.  Companies, in turn, are using technology to make better business decisions and create new solutions for clients that live up to their ever-changing needs — and they need people who can effectively manage data to help create those solutions.

3)     IT Security:  .59 active job seekers for every position
Although it’s a concern when individuals like you, me or Ashton Kutcher get hacked, IT security is especially sensitive for companies, as they have to not only protect their own sensitive information, but that of their clients. It’s not surprising, then, that IT security jobs are often hard to fill, requiring candidates who need to be experts in various aspects of IT such as programming, hardware, network and database expertise.

4)      E-mail Marketer:  .69 active job seekers for every position
The way people consume information is becoming more and more selective — as are their e-mail spam filters and propensity to hit that worn-down “Delete” button on the keyboard. With all the noise coming at people from every direction, it’s now harder for companies to grab consumer attention — and e-mail marketers who know how to cut through the clutter and help them get in front of their target audiences are in high demand.

5)      Financial Adviser:  1.2 active job seekers for every position
With the after-effects of the recent recession still being felt, people are looking for guidance on how to build financial security after depleting their short-term savings, tapping into retirement funds and losing home equity. And with millions of baby boomers on the verge of retirement age, the demand for financial advisers to help build retirement plans is about to become even bigger.

6)      Environmental Engineer – 1.25 active job seekers for every position
“Green jobs” or “green-collar jobs,” otherwise known as jobs focused on environmental preservation, are all the rage. Green jobs are expected to grow at the rate of a whopping 1.3 million jobs per year through 2030, and, fortunately for green employers, more and more job seekers are seeking out employment with environmentally conscious companies. In addition, federal, state and private funding is fueling openings for those able to develop solutions for pollution control, recycling, waste management and other public health initiatives.

7)      Sales Engineer:  1.72 active job seekers for every position
As the economy begins to bounce back, companies are once again expanding their sales forces to increase revenue — and are relying on sales engineers to help close and manage deals around more sophisticated products. These experts are a key part of the sales process, as they compare solutions to competitor offerings, and troubleshoot any issues along the way.

8)     Social Media Manager:  1.78 active job seekers for every position
Social media (rapidly becoming known as simply “media”) moves quickly — and so does the need for those able to manage it. Sites like Facebook and Twitter have seeped into just about every aspect of both our personal and professional lives — and more and more companies are “getting it” and jumping on board to engage people in their brands, build relationships, market products and reach more individuals in new ways. To do this successfully, companies need people with social media savvy and strategic delivery — and fast.

9)      Compliance Analyst:  2.52 active job seekers for every position
These days, companies are being held under greater scrutiny and must meet with more stringent local, federal and state regulations. Health care and financial firms in particular need people who can understand relevant laws and help to establish policies and training programs.

10)  Writer (technical and other):  3.31 active job seekers for every position
From chip manufacturers to software companies, technical writers are needed to clearly explain new products, upgrades and features that are often very specialized. The race to stay on the cutting edge matched with increased investment in new technologies drives continued demand for this technical skill set.

More about the Supply and Demand Portal

How does it work?

The portal pulls data from national employment resources like CareerBuilder.com, Wanted Analytics, and EMSI, in turn getting access to more than 45 million jobs, 40 million resumes and 140 million worker profiles — meaning a ton of rich, relevant data turned into meaningful intelligence. Based on the number of available jobs and available candidates, the portal identifies occupations and corresponding markets with the greatest supply and under-supply of candidates.

The portal can also help your business understand:

  • Where to open a new business or school
  • Top markets with greatest supply of candidates for a particular position
  • Top markets where demand for talent exceeds supply for a particular position
  • Top employers hiring for the talent you need for a particular position
  • Location intelligence through heat maps
  • Common job titles for a given skill
  • How to better hire for emerging or hard-to-fill positions
  • How market saturation may be impacting compensation trends

By using talent intelligence to stay on top of trends in the current labor market, you’ll have a more clear sense of where to find your talent (and your competitors) — and stay one hire ahead.

 

Forbes Magazine Names Utah #1 ‘Best State for Business and Careers’

February 22nd, 2011 No comments

SALT LAKE CITY – Under the leadership of Governor Gary R. Herbert, first as Lt. Governor and now as Governor, the State of Utah has climbed to the top spot in Forbes Magazine’s annual ranking of “The Best States for Business and Careers.”

Utah ranks No. 1 in the report, released Wednesday, bumping Virginia from its four-year reign in the top spot. Among the factors that placed the Beehive State at the top are:

• Annual economic expansion of 3.5% over the past five years
• Annual total employment increase of 1.5%
• Annual increase in household income of 5%
• Decrease of corporate tax rate from 7% to 5%
• Energy costs that are 35% below the national average

“While magazine rankings do not tell the whole story, they certainly create a narrative that shows Utah has all the elements that make us a successful place to start or expand a business and a desirable location to live and raise a family,” Governor Herbert said. “Several years ago, we made a conscious decision to make economic development a priority. We have since consistently climbed in the rankings and, in the past year, our leadership pushed Utah to the top of the list.”

Forbes’ “Best States” ranking measures six categories for business: costs, labor supply, regulatory environment, current economic climate, growth prospects and quality of life.

Utah’s rankings in those categories are:

• Business Costs: 8
• Labor Supply: 5
• Regulatory Environment: 6
• Economic Climate: 1
• Growth Prospects: 20
• Quality of Life: 18

In announcing this year’s results, Forbes noted that while states across the nation have suffered as a result of the national economic downturn, some states, like Utah, have weathered the downturn better than others. The magazine notes: “But some areas are doing better than others, and for many of them, it isn’t an accident. Who’s doing the best job when it comes to fostering growth? Utah.”

“This recognition shows that not only is the State of Utah open for business, it shows that our businesses can compete anywhere in the nation and the world,” said Jason Perry, Governor Herbert’s chief of staff and former executive director of the Governor’s Office of Economic Development.

After selecting Perry to serve as his chief of staff, the Governor appointed Spencer Eccles in September 2009 to serve as GOED’s new executive director. Both appointments served as proof of the Governor’s commitment to economic development in the State.

“The Governor’s directive to me was to continue to make Utah a state where businesses not only wanted to be, but a state where they needed to be,” Eccles said. “We have succeeded in ensuring that Utah has a pro-business environment and an unparalleled quality of life. We will continue to support our existing Utah companies while attracting others to the State.”

Under Governor Herbert’s leadership, the State has announced major expansions of Utah businesses and the relocation of other notable companies to the Beehive State. Forbes notes the many businesses, such as Goldman Sachs, Oracle, eBay and Adobe, which recently acquired Utah’s own Omniture, have recognized the benefits of operating in Utah. Other homegrown companies like Merit Medical, Nelson Laboratories and Sun Products (formerly Huish) have expanded with the assistance of the State and local
communities.

Along with Eccles, GOED operates under the leadership of Derek Miller and Josh Romney, also appointed by Governor Herbert in September 2009 to serve as an economic ambassador to Utah. Together, the Governor’s Office and GOED have forged partnerships between the Utah Legislature, local governments, education and the private sector through initiatives such as the Economic Development Corporation of Utah, USTAR and the Utah Cluster Acceleration Partnership.

“This is a great day for the State of Utah, but I also understand there are still businesses and families in the State that continue to struggle as we emerge from the national recession,” Governor Herbert said. “As Governor, my promise to all Utahns is that I will continue to foster economic growth throughout the State. Expanding our tax base is the single best way to fully fund public education and to pay for other critical state services such as public safety and human services.”

Over the past year, the State has seen the addition of 19,000 new jobs and, as noted by Forbes, now showing positive job growth. Also, preliminary data indicate that statewide sales tax collections are significantly up over this time last year and the State is expected to see revenue growth for the first time in several years – all encouraging factors that point to economic growth in Utah.

The full Forbes article in available online at www.forbes.com/2010/10/13/best-states-forbusiness-business-beltway-best-states.html.

Have Fewer Business Trips Negatively Impacted Your Business?

February 16th, 2011 Comments off

Silhouette of employee walking through airportIf you’re like many companies, you, in the spirit of budget-cutting, slowed down employee travel in 2010 — or even halted it altogether. According to a new CareerBuilder survey among more than 2,400 U.S. employers and more than 3,900 U.S. workers, 30 percent of companies say they cut back on business travel last year — and it wasn’t such a good move for many of them. Of the companies who cut back on travel, more than one-third (37 percent) said it negatively affected their business. Have you had a similar experience?

Lack of business trips and the bottom line

Budget cuts can often have ripple effects in other areas of the business. Many businesses who cut back on travel in 2010 had fewer opportunities for  face-to-face meetings, leading to communication issues, hurdles in fostering client relationships, and, ultimately, fewer sales. When asked how fewer business trips affected their bottom lines, companies reported the following results:

  • Less effective internal communication: 12 percent
  • Fewer sales: 11 percent
  • Less effective execution on internal business initiatives: 10 percent
  • Less customer loyalty: 8 percent

How will this year be different?

Based on 2010′s results, will companies alter business travel frequency in 2011? For the most part, it appears they won’t. The majority of companies (77 percent) report business travel levels will stay the same as last year. Eleven percent said their companies will take more business trips this year (perhaps to counter the negative effects of cutting back in 2010), while 13 percent said business travel will decrease.

Although frequency of travel may be “business as usual” in 2011, many companies have started taking a different direction to help cut unnecessary expense: Altering the way that employees travel.

“Business travel is an important part of many companies’ operations as it lets them stay connected with clients and employees across the globe,” said Rosemary Haefner, vice president of human resources for CareerBuilder. “Some companies are revisiting their policies, though, to ensure they’re maximizing the effectiveness of their business travel initiatives.”

How are companies keeping a closer eye on travel expenses?

  • Taking out the extravagance: Nearly one-third (32 percent) of companies are placing specific restrictions on business travel for employees since the recession, asking them to fly coach, lowering entertainment budgets, and having them only travel domestically.
  • Virtual meetings: Forty-two percent of companies said they rely more on phone/Web conferencing now to conduct business with clients, with 31 percent saying they get just as much out of virtual meetings as face-to-face meetings.

Tell me — has your business cut down on employee travel, or otherwise changed policies around travel to cut costs? What has worked well — and what wouldn’t you do again?

January’s Unemployment Report: Time to Throw Out the Scale?

February 4th, 2011 Comments off

Much like the comically large scale on the Biggest Loser that refuses to budge, no matter how much those hopeful contestants – and the American viewing audience – want it to, this month’s unemployment report offered nothing but disappointment and confusion for the millions of hopeful Americans looking to it for significant signs of progresss.

Disappointment because the economy generated only 36,000 net new jobs – the smallest gain in over four months – according to the BLS. At the same time, however, the unemployment rate dropped remarkably to 9 percent. That’s where the confusion comes in.

And that’s why I say we might want to take today’s jobs numbers with a grain of salt. Hear me out…

You know how when people are trying to lose weight, they’re told to pay less attention to the numbers on the scale and instead focus on how well their clothes are starting to fit? That’s the same attitude we should take with today’s unemployment report.  

Why? Because, in the words of Mark Zandi, Chief Economist at Moody’s Analytics:

“I think these numbers are meaningless,” Zandi told CNBC this morning, pointing out both the weather’s role in the modest job creation, as well as the obvious discrepancy between the household survey numbers (which include self-employed and agricultural workers) and the unemployment survey numbers (which don’t).

Zandi also noted that “January has historically been the month the BLS has had the most difficulty getting right. I would not read anything into any of these numbers.”

I agree. (Because it’s also worth mentioning that Gallup’s numbers also conflict with those released by the BLS today. Confusing!)  So I propose that rather than trying to make sense of how good or bad these numbers really are, we should focus instead on what is in plain sight…

…which is that CareerBuilder continues to see a steady growth in employers posting jobs on our site: proof that employers are hiring and jobs are increasing – and they’re doing so at a steady rate. Take a look at the facts:  

  • Overall job postings on CareerBuilder are up 6 percent year over year.
  • Business development job postings are up 18 percent
  • Customer service job postings are up 28 percent
  • IT job postings are up 45 percent
  • Sales job postings are up 23 percent

For further insight into the jobs numbers, check out the following video of the CNBC interview mentioned above:

Small businesses plan to increase staff in 2011, but still face hiring challenges

February 3rd, 2011 Comments off

When it comes to recruiting, limited resources can mean that small businesses are often up against a separate set of challenges than large corporations. Luckily, creativity and innovation can go a long way when solving many of these problems. On Tuesday, for example, we told you about one of the common recruiting difficulties that small businesses face — attracting and retaining employees — and how developing and implementing a strong employment brand can be a creative way to resolve it.

Unfortunately, though, some of the more pervasive recruiting roadblocks that small businesses face can be a little tougher to bypass. According to a new CareerBuilder survey on small business hiring trends for 2011, respondents said that they expect their biggest recruiting challenges this year will be related to accessing credit, government regulations and health insurance costs — all problems which can be both difficult and frustrating to overcome.

The survey, which polled more than 1,350 small businesses, found the greatest hiring challenges to be:

  • Cost of health insurance — 50 percent
  • Access to credit — 33 percent
  • Government regulations — 27 percent
  • Marketing expenses and building awareness — 26 percent
  • Attracting and hiring top talent — 19 percent

Yet small businesses are nothing if not resilient, and despite these hiring issues, more small businesses still plan to increase headcount this year than in recent years past. Though it’s just a slight increase, 21 percent of responding employers plan to add full-time staff this year, up from 20 percent in 2010 and 15 percent in 2009.

For those who can’t afford to add more full-time staff, but still have personnel needs, contract workers are the next-best thing. To prevent employee burnout and maintain productivity levels, 26 percent of small business owners plan to hire contract or temporary workers in the coming year, with 31 percent reporting that they may transition these workers into full-time positions.

Slightly fewer respondents said they’d meet staffing needs with part-time help. According to the survey, 11 percent of small businesses plan to hire part-time employees this year, up from 9 percent last year and 8 percent in 2009.

Despite a general increase in hiring expected this year, with so many business owners still worried about issues like credit and government regulations, it’s clear that 2011 will be another year of rebuilding.

“Small businesses are a major driving force behind job creation in the U.S. and play a vital role in economic growth,” said Matt Ferguson, CEO of CareerBuilder.  “Small businesses had been in a holding pattern where they were less likely to decrease headcount compared to larger organizations, but also less likely to add new staff. Over the last year, we saw modest, but continued gains in jobs that are carrying over into 2011. Before we see people back to work in greater numbers, we need to find ways to get this segment of the economy hiring again.”

Do you work for a small company? Do you plan to increase your staff this year? What are your biggest hiring challenges?

“The Company Men” Examines Layoffs from both Sides of the Table

January 21st, 2011 Comments off

Last week I got the chance to speak with John Wells, writer and director of “The Company Men” for our sister site, TheWorkBuzz.com. The film, which dissects the effects of layoffs on those who experience them, stars Academy Award winners Ben Affleck, Chris Cooper, Kevin Costner and Tommy Lee Jones, and hits theaters today.

Though “The Company Men” takes the most in-depth look at the psychological and existential effects that job loss has on workers, it also touches on the legal, ethical and emotional struggles experienced by the executives and human resources staff who make the decisions on “who stays and who goes.” An aspect of the film Wells decided to include after speaking with human resources executives (and one that can be seen in the below clip).

“I sort of feel like my first version of [the script was] more like a creed against corporate America and that that wasn’t very fair and probably not balanced, so I went back and interviewed a lot of CEOs and human resources executives, and people were very willing to talk to me,” Wells told TheWorkBuzz. “What I did discover when I talked to companies was that while the individual market realities [of each] company would be different, the structures were very similar and the things they were going through were very similar; how they were having to address [downsizing] no matter why they were having to do it. There were tremendous similarities between corporations and the way they dealt with this stuff.”

To read the full interview on TheWorkBuzz, click here.

Fill Your Pipeline with the Best and Brightest Talent: Introducing Talent Network

January 10th, 2011 Comments off

CareerBuilder's Talent NetworkJust a couple of years ago, the world watched as Wall Street began to rapidly unravel, and we continued to watch as the weeks and months to follow showed further signs of trouble and revealed cracks in our economy that many of us hadn’t the slightest idea existed. When what we were going through was finally officially labeled as a recession, many employers had already thinned out staff levels, cut back budgets, and slashed benefits. Consequently, businesses were forced to “do more with less” (you know, that phrase you’ve heard 1,000,001 times by now.)

No money, no problems?

Faced with fewer resources, many companies decided to roll up their sleeves, get creative, and find new and inexpensive ways to communicate with their clients and job candidates. Some of those inexpensive ways of communicating included Web-based tools like Twitter, Facebook, and YouTube, and they were really starting to take off. Not surprisingly, many human resources professionals were suddenly tasked with taking them on, in addition to all their other responsibilities.

Without proper methods of tracking candidates found through sites like Facebook and Twitter, however, HR managers and recruiters were spinning their wheels and wasting a lot of valuable time. In fact, according to a recent CareerBuilder study, 60 percent of recruiter time was being wasted on non-value-added activities, the majority of recruiters weren’t measuring ROI, and candidate tracking was often only 25 percent accurate due to ATS limitations. Executives were expecting HR to perform miracles through social media — and it wasn’t happening.

While HR was focused on time and cost to hire candidates, business executives were stressing the need to convert HR data to business intelligence.

Now what?

CareerBuilder realized companies needed a solution that accomplished both parties’ objectives — and soon after, Talent Network was born.

Okay, but what is it, exactly?

Talent Network, a custom career site that helps employers build their own pipeline of talent,  enables employers to connect the dots of all the things they are doing to attract job seekers, engage interested candidates, and measure the success of their efforts. Let’s break it down:

Awareness

Talent Network builds awareness for your jobs through five key areas:

  1. Social — Add a link to your Talent Network on social sites all over the Web, including Facebook (via CareerBuilder’s Work@ employee referral system) and Twitter.
  2. SEO — Turn your internal job terms that may be abbreviated, vague or full of company lingo into title descriptions that job seekers instantly understand, and in turn, show up in more search engine results for job seekers looking for your open position.
  3. Mobile — Your Talent Network site is mobile-enabled, giving you instant reach to people searching for jobs on their mobile devices. Tap into a market with explosive growth.
  4. Career Site – Get a designed, hosted and supported career site, drive your target candidates there, and track your progress.
  5. Job Distribution —CareerBuilder’s partnerships with sites like Indeed.com help you gain strong referral links to your jobs.

Engagement

Interact with candidates who have expressed interest in your business or open positions and give them a more satisfying experience.

  • With the click of a button that exists on sites all over the Web, potential employees can arrive at and join your talent network, stay keyed into your available job opportunities, and get personalized alerts with jobs at your company that most match their interests and experience.
  • Capture job seekers’ information before they leave your site, welcome them to your community, and start connecting with them on a deeper level.
  • Send members of your network tailored job recommendations and customized messages. You can even send automated communications when you need to get a broad message out to many people at once.

Measurement
Quality measurement matters. Drive informed business decisions with accurate and in-depth information about your Talent Network’s search traffic, job interactions, and candidate conversions; in other words, gain the most insight available about members of your network.

A Better Way

How does Talent Network solve some of the biggest recruitment and business challenges companies are facing? Let’s take a look:

Old way: Potential candidates are gone before you can get them to take any action on your website.
Talent Network: Encourage visitors to leave a footprint before leaving your website.

Old way: You’re missing out on job search traffic because your jobs are hidden behind your ATS.
Talent Network: Expose and search engine-optimize your jobs, driving relevant candidates to your job openings.

Old way: Your recruiters keep contacts in their own databases, which creates a lot of one-off lists.
Talent Network: Keep all recruiters’ candidate contacts in one location.

Old way: You know who your target candidates are, but you’re struggling to reach them.
Talent Network:
Take advantage of the custom SEO landing pages developed exclusively for your organization, and get in front of those elusive candidates.

Old way: You’re not really sure where your website traffic is coming from.
Talent Network: Get detailed, helpful insight into where your visitors are coming from, as well as what they’re doing once they get there.

Still have questions? Learn more about Talent Network:

Watch a short video or view product demos

Visit the Talent Network page

Read the press release

Feel free to post comments and questions here as well, and we will do our best to answer them.

In Your Face, November: December’s Employment Report Shows Improvement

January 7th, 2011 Comments off

Dropping to 9.4 percent in December, the nation’s unemployment rate is now at its lowest level since April 2009, according to the Labor Department’s employment situation report for December. Good news, yes? Well…

While much of that .4 percent decrease represents those people who are no longer unemployed (yay!), it also represents those people who gave up their job search last month (boo!).

Also according to the report, employers added 103,000 jobs last month. Good news, yes? Well…

While this was more than double the number of jobs added in November (yay!), it fell far below economists’ expectations (boo!).  Here are some highlights from the report:

  • Private employers added 113,000 jobs, while the Government shed 10,000 jobs.
  • The number of unemployed persons dropped by 556,000 to 14.5 million.
  • Looking at specific industries, employment rose in leisure and hospitality, which added 36,000 jobs, and in health care, which added 29,000 jobs.
  • Despite losses in November, in December, retailers added 12,000 jobs and manufacturers added 10,000 jobs. Job losses continued in contruction, which cut 16,000 jobs.

A year in progress: 2010 vs. 2009
A still-over-9-percent unemployment rate is certainly nothing to brag about (not that anyone is trying); however, compared to where we were a year ago, the difference between the economy of 2009 and the economy of today is like the difference between Jersey Shore’s Jwoww of season one and the Jwoww of today – not a total train wreck, but a vast improvement. Take a look at the progress from the past 12 months…

  • The economy added 1.1 million jobs in 2010.
  • The unemployment rate decreased from 10 percent in December 2009 to 9.4 percent in December 2010.
  • The number of unemployed persons went down from 15.3 million in December 2009 to 14.5 million in December 2010.
  • Average hourly earnings have increased by 1.8 percent in 2010.

Good news, yes? Well…
While the economy is showing much needed signs of improvement (yay!) there’s still a lot that needs to change – specifically, the economy needs to add about 250,000 jobs per month before the unemployment rate goes down significantly. (Over the past three months, we’ve averaged 128,000 jobs added, which is only just enough to keep the rate from going up again.) Boo!

Getting to where we want to be will be a daunting effort for sure, but  – let’s end this post on a high note, shall we? - both economists and employers anticipate that 2011 will be an even better year than 2010 in terms of economic growth and employment (yay!).

Thoughts?

Categories: industry news Tags: ,

Justin Bieber’s Got Nothing on These: Top 10 Hiring and Workplace Trends to Watch in 2011

January 6th, 2011 Comments off

Justin Bieber-style haircutWhat do drive-in movie theater dates, Hypercolor t-shirts, and Justin Bieber-inspired haircuts have in common? They’re all trends that have passed through our lives over the years (or, in some cases, are still in our lives). New trends seep into our everyday existence all the time, and the world of hiring and the workplace is no exception. A new CareerBuilder and Harris Interactive survey of more than 2,400 hiring managers and 3,910 workers nationwide identified 10 key trends in business, hiring, work culture and job search to watch out for as we kick off a new year.

Let’s get right to it – here are the 10 top hiring and workplace trends to keep an eye on in 2011, according to survey results:

1) Shifting Business Directions: A whopping 42 percent of employers said their company has changed business directions as a result of the recession. The majority of these employers kept their core business, but added new revenue streams – although 27 percent of those who shifted direction said they changed their core business altogether or expanded into areas that will eventually become their core business.

2) Working Leaner: Thirty-five percent of employers said their current staffs are smaller than pre-recession levels. Of those employers, most don’t foresee adjustments to headcount in 2011, with 57 percent reporting that they have become used to handling the workload with less people.

3) Changing Jobs: Workers are becoming more optimistic about their job prospects in 2011. Fifteen percent of full-time, employed workers are actively seeking a new job, and 76 percent said that although they are not actively looking, they would change jobs in 2011 if the right opportunity came along.

The majority of workers aren’t necessarily focused on a bigger paycheck, either. Sixty-eight percent said affordable benefits are more important to them than salary.

4) Creating New Functions: Along with more traditional job opportunities, employers are adding new functions within their organizations in response to popular movements. Jobs centered around social media, green energy and health care reform are just a few of these “emerging” roles being added in 2011, and hiring managers reported that “cyber warriors,” whose roles are to protect Internet sites from security breaches or fraudulent activity, are in high demand as well.

5) Video Interviewing: With smaller recruiting staffs facing larger numbers of job applications, employers are turning to technology to help find the right candidates. Six percent reported they have conducted video interviews with potential job candidates, while 11 percent plan to do so this year.

6) Less Moonlighting: While making ends meet is still a challenge for many U.S. households, fewer workers are reporting the need to work more than one job. In addition, only 12 percent plan to take on second jobs in 2011, compared to 19 percent in 2010.

7) Taking a Global Perspective: Nearly one in five U.S. employers (18 percent) reported they will be hiring for their operations in other countries in 2011, while 5 percent stated they will likely recruit workers from other countries to work in U.S. locations.

8 ) Relocating Talent: Of workers who were laid off in the last 12 months and found new jobs, 23 percent relocated to a new city or state. For those workers looking to relocate this year, good news: 33 percent of employers said they would be willing to pick up the moving tab for select candidates this year.

9) Promoting Without Pay: Forty-one percent of employers are concerned about losing their top talent as the economy improves. While the majority of employers plan to increase salaries for existing staff in 2011, 39 percent will not be providing raises. As a gesture of recognition to employees without pay increases, however, 13 percent are offering higher titles.

10) Going Casual: Employers are becoming more relaxed about set schedules and dress codes as they work to enhance the typical work experience. Fifteen percent reported they will allow for a more casual dress code, and 33 percent expect to offer more flexible work arrangements like telecommuting and alternate schedules in 2011.

Brent Rasmussen, president of CareerBuilder North America, offers his take on the trends:

“The recession produced fundamental shifts in how companies and workers view the market. “Businesses are becoming more agile and changing direction. They’re operating leaner and recruiting for opportunities in emerging areas. Workers are transitioning to new fields, are more open to relocation and are more apt to consider opportunities outside of their current employers.”

Which trends do you foresee most aligning with your business direction in 2011?

Did We Expect Too Much? November’s Disappointing Job Numbers

December 3rd, 2010 Comments off

Anyone else feel like they were just handed a Jelly of the Month membership – a la Clark Griswold in Christmas Vacation – right about now?

I suppose we expected too much, what with last month’s BLS Employment Situation Report revealing better-than-anticipated job growth in October and setting our hopes high for a similar outcome in November. But apparently, triple-digit job growth two months in a row is too much to ask.

I’ll just say it: the findings from November’s employment situation report suck. Maybe not November 2008 suck (remember those numbers? Those numbers sucked…), but the economy definitely lost momentum in the past month. By a lot.

After adding a whopping 172,000 jobs in October, the economy only added a fraction of that number in November: 39,000 new jobs, to be exact.  Not only did this figure fall short of the 150,000 added jobs economists predicted, but it also fell short of the 120,000 jobs needed to keep the unemployment rate steady, which explains why it rose to 9.8 percent (up from 9.6 percent in October). 

Some more findings from the report: 

  • Private employers added 50,000 jobs, the smallest gain since January.
  • 15.1 million people were out of work in November.
  • The number of underemployed (people working part-time who would prefer full-time jobs and those who have given up looking for work) was 17 percent.
  • Job losses included retailers with 28,100 job cuts; factories with 13,000; financial firms with 9,000; and construction companies with 5,000. The public sector eliminated 11,000 positions, mostly reflecting cuts from local governments.

A Few Bright Spots
While this month’s report likely necessitates a new word for “disappointing,” there were some bright spots: health care industry added 19,000 jobs last month, and the mining sector added 6,000 jobs. Temporary jobs continue to show strong growth, with 40,000 added jobs in November and an overall increase since September of last year.

It’s also worth noting that the unemployment rate is a lagging indicator, and that job growth typically slows in November anyway. What’s more, consider the remarks from financial research firm Baird, in a statement released today: “The weight of evidence from the ADP report, initial jobless claims, both ISM reports, and the Beige Book (not to mention multiple contacts with recruiters) continues to point to an improvement in the macro economy and in employment,” and, “We think this report will be revised.” 

So that’s something…right? *Sigh* Oh, Cousin Eddie, if only your heart “that’s bigger than its brain” could help us through this one.

Till next month, readers…

Smart Talk on Social Media Trends in the Workplace: Videos from Staffing World 2010

October 15th, 2010 Comments off

Today’s the last day of the American Staffing Association’s Staffing World 2010 conference in Las Vegas, and although what happens in Vegas normally does stay in Vegas, we’ve managed to  snag some PG-style videos and commentary about recruiting and staffing firm leaders’ views on social media trends.

1) Hear how some staffing firms are using social media right now, even during the conference, to promote their firms and engage with candidates:

2) Here are panelists from yesterday’s social media panel at Staffing World, talking about adopting and managing social media, and addressing the question so many are asking: Where’s the return on investment in social media?

3) Lastly, here’s Richard Wahlquist, President and the CEO of ASA, discussing the state of the staffing and recruiting industry today, which issues are top of mind right now for firms, and where the industry is headed as we work toward economic recovery:

Remember, you can check out all of CareerBuilder’s videos from Staffing World here, or follow along with the tweets.

Bruce Tulgan Talks Talent in the New Economy and More at Staffing World 2010

October 14th, 2010 Comments off

CareerBuilder Staffing & RecruitingThe American Staffing Association’s Staffing World 2010 conference, taking place at the Venetian Casino Hotel Resort in Las Vegas, NV, is well underway. Throngs of recruiting and staffing professionals have been mingling and networking, attending professional development sessions like keynotes and workshops, browsing exhibitor booths (like CareerBuilder’s — yes, that’s a shameless plug), and generally having a great time while learning more about how to not only adapt but thrive in our rapidly changing workplace. And we want to share some of those learnings with all of you.

New Economy, New Attitudes

We all know businesses are rethinking their strategies, doing more with less, and thinking creatively to get ahead in today’s  economy. What’s worked in the past won’t necessarily work now, and everything from the role of contingent workers to the attitudes of Gen Y in the workplace are shifting. As ASA says on their site, “The “Great Recession’ reset the global economy to a ‘new normal.’” We’re all figuring out how to adjust as the dust settles, and conferences like this are an opportunity to share ideas and push the conversation forward.

Although I’m going to post more videos in a subsequent post, you can find all of CareerBuilder’s videos from Staffing World here and peruse them at your leisure — and be sure to follow along with the conference tweets with hashtag #sw10.

Here’s the first video I wanted to share — it features Bruce Tulgan, keynote speaker at Staffing World 2010 and founder of Rainmaker Thinking Inc. In the video, he talks to CareerBuilder about what we’re dealing with right now: a highly uncertain business environment,  a high-pressure workplace and a high maintenance work force. Although he focuses on what this combination means for staffing firms and talent, much of his advice can really be applied to any business:

What’s your take on what Bruce has to say?

No News is Good News? The Latest (Ho-Hum) Employment Situation Report

October 8th, 2010 Comments off

Get your favorite seasonally appropriate pumpkin-flavored coffee beverage in hand: The latest Unemployment Situation Report is here. Just make sure that drink is caffeinated, because today’s BLS report is pretty – as Credit Suisse economists called it – “blasé.”

For the most part, figures were relatively unchanged from August to September, which certainly bodes well in the “no news is good news” sense that we’re still on the road to recovery…at the same time, however, we’re still on the road to recovery.

Even as top economists speculate that a double-dip recession is unlikely (silver lining!), it is painfully evident that recovery is going to take a long time… An AP story today cited Deutsche Bank economists pointing out that since the recession ended in June 2009, the economy has only grown 3 percent – far less than the average 6.5 percent pace in postwar recoveries. Here’s a recap of the report:

What stayed (nearly) the same:

  •  Unemployment was essentially unchanged, with the number of unemployed persons at 14.8 million and a steady unemployment rate of 9.6 percent.
  • The number of long-term unemployed (those jobless for 27 weeks and over), at 6.1 million, was little changed over the month but was down by 640,000 since a series high of 6.8 million in May.
  • The average workweek for all employees was unchanged at 34.2 hours.
  • Average hourly earnings for both employees on private nonfarm payrolls and private-sector production and nonsupervisory employees increased by a whopping 1 cent (to $22.67 and $19.10, respectively).
  • Employment in manufacturing, wholesale trade, retail trade, transportation and warehousing, information, and financial activities showed little change in September.

What changed for the better…

  • Private-sector payroll employment continued to trend up over the month, adding 64,000 jobs.
  • Health care employment rose by 24,000; professional and business services added 28,000 jobs; and leisure and hospitality jobs increased by 34,000.
  • Mining employment added 6,000 over the month.

… and for the worse:

  • The number of persons employed part time for economic reasons (those working part time because their hours were cut back or they were unable to find full-time work) rose by 612,000 over the month to 9.5 million.
  • Total nonfarm payroll employment edged down by 95,000, government employment fell by 159,000, and employment in construction fell by 21,000.

For more highlights from the forecast, watch this clip of CareerBuilder CEO Matt Ferguson on Squawk Box , as he discusses the hiring outlook for the next half of the year:

 

Categories: industry news Tags: ,

Get Your Free Copy of CareerBuilder’s Q4 2010 Job Forecast Here

October 7th, 2010 Comments off

CareerBuilder and USA Today's Q4 2010 Job Forecast

Twenty-one percent of employers expect to add full-time, permanent employees in the fourth quarter, according to the latest survey from CareerBuilder and USA TODAY (download the full report here) of more than 2,400 hiring managers and human resource professionals and more than 3,100 workers.

While we’re not necessarily “in the clear,” “over the hump,” “on the comeback trail,”breathing a sigh of relief,” or (enter overused phrase here), some aspects of Q3 were positive in terms of hiring, and Q4′s projections put us on track to continue the past several quarters’ positive trends.

The state of 2010: Projections versus reality

  • Looking at the state of hiring in 2010 thus far, 24 percent of employers reported adding full-time, permanent headcount in each quarter from January through September — better than original projections for that period, which averaged 21 percent.
  • In addition, actual hiring has consistently beat projected hiring for the last six quarters of the survey. If trends persist, we could be looking at the actual number of hires for the fourth quarter exceeding projections as well.

Where were we a year ago?

In terms of actual hiring back in Q4 2009, 20 percent of employers reported they had hired full-time, permanent staff, while 13 percent decreased headcount — so, if actual hiring meets this quarter’s projections (which, as stated above, is likely to happen, as actual hiring numbers have trended to not only meet but exceed projections for the last year and a half), we’re looking a bit better in terms of hiring (and downsizing) than we were a year ago.

CareerBuilder CEO Matt Ferguson on this year’s trends and where we’re headed:

“We have seen positive job creation trends throughout the year, where positions are opening across industries each month,” said Ferguson.

“The return to pre-recession employment levels will take some time.  Although the recession officially ended a year ago, we still have an economy burdened by debt.  Employers are watchful and gradually augmenting their staffs with permanent and temporary hiring.”

What happened this past quarter?

Q3 2010 also showed signs of improvement over Q3 2009:

  • More hiring: For one, 25 percent of employers reported they added full-time, permanent employees, up from 18 percent in the same period last year.  This signifies three consecutive quarters of both sequential and year over year improvements in 2010.
  • Not as much downsizing: In addition, 12 percent of employers decreased headcount, down from 15 percent last year.  Sixty-two percent reported no change in their number of full-time, permanent employees while one percent were undecided.

What’s ahead for Q4?

Well, things are looking consistent as far as projected hiring, as this is the fourth consecutive quarter where at least one in five employers planned to increase headcount. Specifically:

  • Twenty-one percent of employers plan to increase their full-time, permanent headcount in the fourth quarter, while 10 percent expect to downsize staffs.
  • Sixty-five percent anticipate no change, while 4 percent are undecided.

Other Forecast Highlights

Temporary Hiring

  • Many employers are hesitant about ramping back up to full capacity. As a result, 30 percent hired contract and temporary workers in Q3, and 27 percent plan to do so in Q4. And some employees will be looking at full-time gigs: 24 percent of employers said they’re planning to turn some of these positions into permanent jobs.
  • At 27 percent, IT leads the pack as far as most likely to hire temporary or contract workers in Q4, followed by engineering and finance/accounting.

Hiring By Company Size

Although small businesses continue to struggle with accessing credit needed to operate and expand their businesses, some of them plan to add staff by the end of the year (as do some larger companies), while other companies plan to reduce work force in Q4:

  • Thirteen percent of employers with 50 or less employees, 24 percent of employers with 51 to 250 employees, and 26 percent of employers with more than 250 employees plan to increase headcount in the fourth quarter.
  • Seven percent of employers with 1 to 50 employees plan to reduce their work force in the fourth quarter, compared to 8 percent of businesses with 51 to 250 employees and 12 percent with more than 250 employees.

Compensation in Q4 2010

Many employers aren’t looking to increase salary — but the good news is that only 5 percent anticipate a decrease in salaries, and many employers are looking to give at least small salary increases.

  • Forty-one percent of employers anticipate no change in salary levels in the fourth quarter compared to the same period last year.
  • Thirty-five percent expect there will be an increase of 3 percent or less.
  • Fourteen percent expect their average changes will be between 4 and 10 percent and 1 percent predict an increase of 11 percent or more.

The Worker’s Perspective

As we’ve mentioned before in our mid-year job forecast, only half of full-time, employed workers said they are happier with their employment situation today than they were one year ago.  The other half, predictably, are not.

Why the lack of job satisfaction? Well, workers report several contributing factors; one of the biggest is that they say they’re not able to contribute to their roles at the levels they would like to be.

  • Nearly three in ten workers (29 percent) reported feeling underemployed.
  • Of these workers, 71 percent stated their skills and experience aren’t being utilized to their full potential, 45 percent don’t feel challenged and 30 percent stated they don’t feel a sense of autonomy in their positions.
  • Nineteen percent said they feel underemployed because they took a job during the recession that was lower than their previous position.
  • Twenty-seven percent of all workers reported they don’t feel loyal to their current employer.

You can read the full report here.

What do you think about Q4′s job forecast and the outlook for hiring?

Are Potential Employees Scoffing at Your Salary Offer?

September 23rd, 2010 Comments off

Woman rejecting a job offer“Employers are at an advantage in our current economy.”
“Candidates will take any offer you make because they need a job.”
“It’s an employer’s market — candidates can’t expect to make what they used to.”

Heard any of these statements lately? Think they’re true yourself and are abiding by this philosophy — or know a company that is? Well, companies with this mentality may be in for a rude awakening, as the idea that all unemployed workers in our current market will “take anything” just to get a paycheck is a misconception. Evidence of this is shown in the survey just released by Personified, CareerBuilder’s talent consulting arm, among 925 unemployed U.S. workers. The overwhelming majority of unemployed workers surveyed who have received a job offer since unemployment have rejected the offer because the offer was too low. In fact, 17 percent of unemployed workers surveyed have received at least one job offer since they’ve become unemployed, and of those people, a whopping 92 percent rejected the offer. More than half (54 percent) reported that they did so because the offer was more than 25 percent lower than the salary they had earned in their most recent position.

Many unemployed workers are looking for the right job

Although many unemployed workers are eager to start earning a paycheck, not all of them are willing to jump at the first thing they can get. And really, as an employer, would you want them to? I mean, sure, you may need to hire people quickly, but you still need to find quality employees who  truly want to work for your company and are going to stick around. Otherwise, you’re just getting warm bodies who are going to walk right back out that door once they find something better (or with better pay, or prestige, or opportunities, or — well, see below).

Job offers not paying off for other reasons, too

While insufficient pay was the number one reason unemployed workers turned down a job opportunity, workers had other things to say about the jobs they were being offered — and the companies offering them.

Other factors cited include:

  • A long commute
  • A lower title
  • The position was outside of their field
  • Little room for career advancement
  • A poor hiring process.

“Rather than jumping on the first job offer that comes their way, workers are assessing which opportunities really make the most sense for them in terms of compensation and long-term potential,” said Mary Delaney, President of Personified.

While the above factors are not always in a company’s hands, there are certainly things employers can do to improve the hiring experience for candidates and enrich the opportunities of the job position in question. And while it may be true that a job is better than no job, and desperate times call for desperate measures, and (insert cliché phrase here), many unemployed workers are looking for not just a job, but a job that suits their lifestyle and long-term goals — and they’re willing to wait a bit to find it. And didn’t our parents always tell us, the best things come to those who wait?

How often are the hunters hunting?

Speaking of waiting, some unemployed workers aren’t spending much time looking for jobs; 18 percent reported they spend five hours or less per week searching for a job. While it’s true that some of those workers may also have inflated expectations of what’s out there in terms of jobs, thinking they can get the job of their dreams without much or any effort, this appears to be the exception rather than the rule.

Many are treating job searching like the full-time job it often is: Thirty percent of those surveyed allocate more than 20 hours a week, and 62 percent apply to an average of more than ten jobs per week. The amount of time unemployed workers are spending searching for jobs also trended by education and pay levels; see full details in the press release here.

If you mean it, they will come

Candidates and employees, whether in an up or a down economy, deserve to be treated with respect — and even in a down economy, they still need to know you fit into their goals and have their future in mind. If you’ve tried working the numbers every which way, made sure your compensation strategy is solid, and just can’t pay more than you’re offering, you’ve at least made the effort — and that’s when you can focus on making your company offerings shine in other ways. Start with your employees — the things they love about their job are likely the same things a potential employee will love about it, too. It’s not always about the money — and a candidate may really want to work for you because of the great career advancement you offer or your awesome company culture or your stellar reputation. Everyone is different, and that translates to different motivations. Our own readers on The Hiring Site shared the factors — both abstract and tangible — that make their company special and sell their ideal candidates on the job.

It’s the companies with the “candidates will take whatever they can get” mentality, the ones who take advantage of the situation unemployed workers are in by grossly undercutting what workers are worth, who need to adjust their way of thinking.  Otherwise, they’re going to be left with a lot of empty seats where employees briefly sat before moving on to that job they really wanted.

Thoughts? Completely disagree or see it from another angle?

Call Off Your Goons: ‘No Signs of Double Dip’ in Latest Jobs Report

September 3rd, 2010 Comments off

Another monthly jobs report from the Labor Department, another mix of decent and not-overly-fantastic news.  Take a look at some of the more positive findings from the report:

  • Private companies added 67,000 jobs in August, more than the 41,000 economists had forecast, bringing the total number of jobs added in private sector employment since December 2009 to 763,000.
  • The numbers for previous months were revised to show an overall loss of 175,000 jobs in June rather than 221,000; and a loss of 54,000 in July, instead of 131,000.
  • Average hourly earnings rose 0.3 percent in August, and the number of temporary jobs rose by 16,800.

…and some of the not-so-positive findings:

  • Overall, the government lost 121,000 jobs in August, bring the total number of unemployed people to 14.86 million in August, up from 14.59 million in July.
  • The unemployment rate rose slightly to 9.6 percent from 9.5 percent (however, the increase is due mainly to the surge of people rejoining the labor force rather than job loss). 

While  today’s numbers didn’t reveal anything that hasn’t already been made very clear over the past several months (yes, we get that the economy is recovering, and yes, we also understand that it’s taking its sweet time to do so, and yes, we’re more than aware that we shouldn’t get too excited just yet, okay?)…

…there is one little nugget of information we can take home: August’s better-than-predicted job growth seems to disprove recent speculation from economists that we might be headed toward a double-dip recession. Scott Brown, an economist at Raymond James, told NPR that he sees no sign of the country slipping back into recession. “You’re still seeing broad-based job gains. It’s not strong, but it’s positive,” he said.

Over at The New York Times, however, Credit Union National Association economist Bill Hampel indicated that he’d like to see the job growth numbers surpass 100,000 before we can be sure we won’t slip back into a recession. “We need it over 150,000 to feel confident we have a nice, sustainable recovery,” he was quoted as saying.

More Reactions to Today’s Numbers…
Overall, economists’ speculation on the future of the recovery is cautious but optimistic. Here’s what others are saying in response to today’s numbers:

 “While the economy is still soft, at least it is expanding. Unless the Fed sees a double-dip recession or deflation as a risk, it will be in wait-and-see mode and we do not expect Fed hikes until 2012.” – Michell Meyer, senior US economist, Bank of America Merrill Lynch

“If you look at it in absolute terms, it’s not very good. But relative to expectations, it’s clearly better than expected and it suggests we’re still growing. We’re not growing very fast, but it doesn’t suggest the situation is continuing to deteriorate.” – Nigel Gault, chief US economist, IHS Global Insight

“You have to take these earnings reports relative to expectations, so all in all this will be reviewed as a favorable report showing that the private sector is stabilizing and once we get past the drag from the census – and I think we are close to being past the drag from the census – that we will start to see some positive numbers for the totals in the months ahead.” - Robert Dye, senior economist, PNC Financial Services Group

“Obviously one month doesn’t make a trend, but hopefully this means the next couple of months will show continued growth.” - Cort Gwon, director of trading strategies and research, FBN Securities

“This will offer short-term relief to currency and equity markets by reducing stress on the Federal Reserve to add more stimulus.” – Kathy Lien, director of currency research, GFT

Categories: industry news Tags: ,

Do Employers Pay the Price For Employees’ Financial Woes?

September 1st, 2010 Comments off

Employers may want to pay attention to a new CareerBuilder survey that reveals that one in five workers are having trouble making ends meet. After all, financial worries don’t just take a toll on workers’ stress levels: Studies have shown that money-related distress can negatively affect employees’ quality of work - and, ultimately, the company’s bottom line

According to the survey of more than 4,400 workers nationwide, 77 percent of workers live paycheck to paycheck to make ends meet, up from 61 percent who said the same last year.  And as many as 22 percent said they’ve missed bill payment in the last year.

You might not be able to manually solve your employees’ financial problems, but you can help them better manage – and feel more in control of –  their finances. As a result, they will be less distracted on the job and more focused on their work:

Ask for feedback.  Instead of guessing what your employees want, go straight to the source to find out how you can be of assistance to your employees. From there, you can negotiate which cost-effective benefits you can provide – such as flexible schedules (to cut down on child-care costs or gas) – to best address their needs.

Focus on what you can offer them.  Maybe providing a bigger paycheck isn’t an option, but again, you’d be surprised by what you can offer your employees that doesn’t scream “cha-ching!” – such as setting up an employee assistance program, where they can go to for financial (or general) advice; inviting financial planning professionals to come speak and answer questions; or providing free educational resources such as classes and webinars or newsletters that contain information and advice on financial planning and fiscal responsibility.

Help them maximize their benefits. Many employees don’t take advantage of their employers’ benefits simply because they are unaware of them or aren’t sure how to make use of them. Step up your communication efforts to make sure your employees know of all the benefits available to them. Set up meetings with various teams or departments and HR to discuss these benefits and answer any questions they may have. 

Finally, check out what other companies are doing: When we released this survey last year, we asked readers to weigh in and tell us how their company was helping employees weather the rough spots of the uncertain economy, and here were some of their answers:

  • Offer flexible/alternative work schedules and telecommuting
  • Encourage employees to sign up for 401(k) accounts  
  • Offer educational literature or presentations specific to specific to investing/retirement planning
  • Catered breakfast or lunch (like free pizza on Fridays)
  • Provide advances on wages or 401(k) savings  
  • Offer flexible spending accounts for commuters

And should all else fail…two words: Power naps.

Categories: industry news Tags: ,

BLS Employment Situation Report for July — Channeling “Groundhog Day”?

August 6th, 2010 Comments off

July’s job numbers were just released by the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics, and they may give you flashes of Bill Murray a la Groundhog Day, as the unemployment rate remained at 9.5 percent in July and another month went by without significant improvement in our employment situation.  But as Bill Murray’s character, Phil Connors,  reminded us in the film, we can see see the groundhog signifying six more weeks of winter as  bleak and dark and bereft of hope,  or look at the positives of the situation and acknowledge where we’re improving. After all, we’ve gained 630,000 private sector jobs this year — and there’s still five months of 2010 that remains to be seen.

Additionally, we’re seeing moderate, sequential improvements across almost every job category on CareerBuilder itself. Entry-level jobs are up 100 percent year over year,  and in the skilled areas for both construction and manufacturing, we’re seeing jobs up 50 percent year over year, as CareerBuilder CEO Matt Ferguson pointed out on CNBC’s Squawk Box this morning. Ferguson explained July’s job numbers from his point of view, how things have changed since 2008, and the good and the bad of what’s going on now.

Watch the VIDEO:


Let’s take a closer look at BLS’s Employment Situation report for July:

  • Both the number of unemployed persons, at 14.6 million, and the unemployment rate, at 9.5 percent, were unchanged in July.
  • Total nonfarm payroll employment declined by 131,000 in July, but those losses were due to to 143,000 temporary workers hired for the decennial census completing their work.
  • So far this year, private sector employment has increased by 630,000, with about two-thirds of the gain occurring in March and April.
  • The average hourly wage rose slightly in July, from $22.55, to $22.59. Over the past 12 months, average hourly earnings have increased by 1.8 percent.
  • Private employers added 71,000 jobs in July, up from a downwardly revised 31,000 in June but below the consensus forecast of 90,000.
  • The number of persons employed part time for economic reasons (because either their hours had been cut back or they were unable to find a full-time job) was essentially unchanged over the month at 8.5 million but has declined by 623,000 since April.
  • The average workweek for all employees on private nonfarm payrolls increased from 34.1 hours to 34.2 hours — signaling employers are looking for more productivity from the same number of workers.

NOTE: June’s number was revised dramatically downward to a total loss of 221,000 jobs. The agency originally reported that the nation lost 125,000 jobs in June.

Industry-Specific Changes for July:

  • Manufacturing employment increased by 36,000 over the month. Manufacturing employment has expanded by 183,000 since December 2009.
  • Health care added 27,000 jobs in July. Over the past 12 months, health care employment has risen by 231,000.
  • Employment in professional and business services was little changed (13,000) in July.
  • The number of jobs in temporary help services showed little movement (-6,000) over the month.
  • Employment in financial activities continued to trend down in July, with a decline of 17,000. So far this year, monthly job losses in the industry have averaged 12,000, compared with an average monthly job loss of 29,000 for all of 2009.
  • Construction employment changed little (-11,000) in July; 10,000 construction workers were off payrolls due to strike activity.
  • Employment in other private-sector industries, including wholesale trade, retail trade, information, and leisure and hospitality showed little change in July.

What happens next?

Although we’ve pointed out positives when looking at 2010 as a whole, expectations are high, and many say job market improvements are not keeping up with the number of entrants to the job market. An article in The New York Times stresses that today’s unemployment report renewed pressure on lawmakers to consider the next steps they might take to bolster the economy. After more of the same with job numbers, employers are hoping to break the Phil Connors cycle and wake up next to Rita with “I’ve Got You Babe” playing on the radio — er, wake up with more jobs to be had and more people getting work. Time will tell as to what combination of factors will get us there — and stop us from stepping in that same puddle every morning.

The HIRE Act — What Does It Mean for Your Business?

July 27th, 2010 Comments off

Woman with "Hire Me" signLast week, I talked about the pros and cons of rehiring former employees, and mentioned that the Hiring Incentives to Restore Employment (HIRE) Act is one of the major reasons employers should be looking at hiring unemployed workers (which could include former employees). But let’s explore further why the bill is so important — both for unemployed workers and the employers hiring them. After all, as a CFO, controller, business owner, vice president of human resources, hiring manager, accountant, or anyone else with a stake in your business’s bottom line, the HIRE Act could have a significant impact on your business.

What is the HIRE Act?

The $17.5 billion legislation, signed into law by President Obama on March 18, 2010, gives a potential tax exemption and credit to businesses that hire unemployed workers. Specifically, the HIRE Act grants businesses that hire workers unemployed 60 days or longer an exemption from the 6.2 percent Social Security payroll taxes for each worker for the remainder of 2010. Additionally, if workers are retained for one year, participating businesses  get a tax credit of $1,000.

The maximum value of this incentive is $6,621 per qualified employee, which equals 6.2 percent of the Social Security FICA maximum wage cap of $106,800.

The goal:

The HIRE Act aims to provide hiring incentives to stimulate the economy, restore some of the jobs lost in the latest economic recession, and put Americans back to work. The average unemployed worker has been unemployed for ten months, so the Act is in effect targeting those job seekers who have been having difficulty finding work for quite some time.  The HIRE Act calls on employers like you to hire unemployed workers and work to retain them.

Keep in mind, recent graduates who are unemployed or working part-time can qualify — so if you’re seeking out new grads or are a start-up looking for fresh talent, you should also be looking into the HIRE Act.

The two major tax incentives of the HIRE Act

No. 1:

Employers who hire unemployed workers this year (after Feb. 3, 2010 and before Jan. 1, 2011) may qualify for a 6.2-percent payroll tax exemption, in effect exempting them from their share of Social Security taxes on wages paid to these workers between Mar. 19, 2010 and Dec. 31, 2010.

  • This reduced tax withholding will have no effect on the employee’s future Social Security benefits, and as an employer, you will still need to withhold the employee’s 6.2-percent share of Social Security taxes, as well as income taxes.
  • The employer and employee’s shares of Medicare taxes would also still apply to these wages.

No. 2:

For each worker retained for at least a year, businesses may claim an additional retention credit, up to $1,000 per worker, when they file their 2011 income tax returns.

Significant savings

Let’s say you hire an employee and pay them a $60,000 salary. Normally, you would have to pay 6.2 percent Social Security payroll tax, or $3,720. With the HIRE Act, your business wouldn’t have to pay that $3,720, plus you have the potential of an additional $1,000 tax credit if that employee stays with your company for one year.

Finding the right employees with the HIRE Act

Not only are you helping stimulate the economy and employ people who need work, but you are also potentially saving a significant amount of money that will impact your bottom line. Instead of looking at hiring as an expense, the HIRE Act encourages employers to think of  hiring as an investment.

While the HIRE Act helps making hiring “cheaper,” the quality of your new hires is still paramount; you and I both know that cost savings plus a bad hire is actually more expensive in the long run. This is why CareerBuilder is focused on targeting the right people within that group who would be a good fit for your organization.

CareerBuilder currently attracts more than 9 million unique visitors each month who meet the qualifications as set by the HIRE Act. We go even further by helping you find the qualified workers who are the right fit for your particular culture and business needs. After all, you might need one employee or 100 — but it’s important that you find the right employees to stick around and grow with your business.

The Fine Print: Criteria needed for a business to receive benefits of the HIRE Act

  • New employee/s must be hired between Feb. 4, 2010 and December 31, 2010.
  • The payroll tax exemptions are effective for wages paid between Mar. 19, 2010 and Dec. 31, 2010.
  • The newly hired employees must have been unemployed during the 60 days prior to starting work, or worked fewer than 40 hours for someone else during that 60-day period (and the employer must get a statement from each eligible new hire certifying this fact).
  • New hires filling positions qualify, but only if the workers they are replacing left voluntarily or for cause.
  • Family members or relatives do not qualify.
  • Businesses, agricultural employers, tax-exempt organizations and public colleges and universities DO qualify to claim the payroll tax — although household businesses and federal, state and local governments l do not.

HIRE Act — How are businesses reacting?

It’s a bit of a chicken versus egg argument; it’s hard to say at this point whether the HIRE Act is causing employers to hire more, or businesses are catching on to it after they have already hired. Regardless, any businesses are taking advantage of the new legislation. And although the HIRE Act expires Jan. 1, 2011, President Obama is working to extend it. According to a recent report by the U.S. Department of the Treasury:

  • From Feb. to May 2010, an estimated 4.5 million workers who had been unemployed for eight weeks or longer were hired — meaning all of the employers who hired these workers are eligible for the HIRE Act payroll tax exemption.
  • Newly hired workers whose employers are eligible for the exemption constitute 12.2 percent of all workers who were unemployed for eight weeks or longer since the law took effect.
  • If the 4.5 million newly hired employees who are eligible for the exemption are employed for the rest of the year, their employers would be (collectively) eligible for an estimated $5.1 billion in payroll tax savings.

Find out more about the HIRE Act

While we’ve covered a lot of the basics here, you’ll still want to investigate further to find out how your business can qualify. Here are some additional resources:

Are You Underestimating Overqualified Workers?

July 26th, 2010 Comments off

Rejecting a candidate because they have too many credentials? On the surface, it seems absurd: Here, it seems you’ve been handed the opportunity to snag executive-level talent at an entry level price…and yet you know that doing so means you could soon be dealing with a very bitter employee who resents taking a job that is below them, or perhaps you fear they’ll leave the minute a better opportunity comes along…

That’s the dilemma employers face when it comes to hiring overqualified workers – and why so many just say no; however, while you certainly want to be wary of someone who “will just take anything” to make ends meet (not that you don’t sympathize), you could also be doing yourself a disservice by dismissing an overqualified worker outright – and miss the opportunity to score major talent for your organization.

So before you immediately dismiss an overqualified worker, just consider the following questions to help you assess why you’re really discounting them – and if you should reconsider…

How do I define “overqualified”?
Dismissing someone based only on a resume that is more extensive than what the hiring manager expected might be jumping the gun.  For one thing, having “too much” experience is relative.  Check with the hiring manager to see how much additional qualification is acceptable before ruling someone out entirely.  Not to mention that more experience and qualifications means less time spent training and developing the individual. And finally, just because the person may have more experience doesn’t mean he or she isn’t the best person for the job – it might be worth your time to let the candidate prove it to you. 

Are my biases getting in the way?
“Every organization has its own internal biases…Hiring managers and recruiters need to acknowledge these biases and realize that great candidates may not fit the typical mold,” one commenter reasoned in response to an earlier post I’d written about not writing off candidates too soon.

Echoing this sentiment, management expert F. John Reh writes that the biggest obstacle to hiring overqualified workers is dealing with underqualified managers who feel threatened by the idea of having someone on their team who is competing for their position or will do anything that might highlight their own shortcomings. What these managers fail to realize, however, is that something done well by their team will actually reflect well on them.

Also, judging from the comments generated by a recent TheWorkBuzz post asking workers to discuss how they felt about being overqualified for their jobs, it’s apparent that many job seekers are frustrated by the “overqualified” label – and many suspect that employers just use this term as an excuse for not hiring older workers. (If that’s true, it’s important to realize that mature workers “offer a wealth of knowledge and experience that has translated into a significant competitive advantage for employers,” according to Rosemary Haefner, Vice President of Human Resources at CareerBuilder.)

Am I assuming too much?
It’s understandable that you might suspect that a worker with more experience than the minimum qualifications will ask for too much pay; however, posting the salary or salary range for the position in the job ad will help to screen out these applicants.  While there’s still the risk that a more experienced worker may still push for a higher salary, that doesn’t mean they won’t ultimately – and happily – accept the salary you offer.

Perhaps you’re worried that a more experienced individual will be more difficult to manage than someone “greener,” but you shouldn’t screen based on this assumption: wait until the interview process, where you can find out about the person’s personality, work ethic and cultural fit within the organization.

It’s also common to assume that an overqualified worker will be bored in his or her “lesser” role, and is simply waiting for the job market to open up to pursue better opportunities, which is, of course, a valid concern – but it’s a concern that should apply to all of your employees.  A recent New York Times article addressed this topic, saying that while studies indicate that workers who perceive themselves as overqualified do tend to report lower job satisfaction and higher rates of turnover, various research shows that these workers tend to perform better – and that managers can mitigate many of the negatives that come with overqualified hires by giving their worker autonomy, treating them with respect, and making them feel valued.

Thoughts? Have you had experience hiring or managing what you’d consider overqualified workers?

Congratulations to our awesome Employees!

July 22nd, 2010 No comments

Congratulations to all employees at Parallel HR for receiving the award as a “Top 25 Under 5″ Company at UVEF’s 2010 event! We are so proud and thankful for all the hard work and effort that has been put forth by our TEAM! We look forward to continuing to grow and provide the best Client Services in the Staffing Industry.

Check out the links below:
UVEF Top 25 Under 5
Utah’s Fastest-Growing Startups Recognized

Small Business Hiring Shows Promise for Economic Relief

July 21st, 2010 Comments off

Could this be a good sign? CareerBuilder’s latest nationwide survey, released today, shows that small businesses will be hiring in the second half of 2010. Considering small business is one of the major drivers for economic recovery and job growth, I think the answer’s a definite …hopefully

Findings from the survey of more than 1,300 employers in businesses with 500 or fewer employees indicate that in the second half of the year, 32 percent of companies with 500 or fewer employees plan to add new employees.  Twenty-four percent of companies with 50 or fewer employees said the same.

Seeing these plans for growth mean not only good things for small businesses, but should come as good news about the state of the economy overall. In a statement for the press release, Brent Rasmussen, President of CareerBuilder North America, said, “Historically, it has been the small business sector that has created the most jobs at the end of an economic downturn, allowing the overall job market to bounce back faster.”

And according to the U.S. Small Business Administration, small businesses employ just over half of all private sector employees, account for more than half of nonfarm private gross domestic product, and have generated 64 percent of net new jobs over the past 15 years.

For more on these findings, see the full press release.

Former Employees: Should You Rehire Them?

July 20th, 2010 Comments off

This year, 54 percent of large U.S. businesses that laid off employees in the past year want to rebuild their work forces, but some will have trouble finding the skilled workers they are looking for, according to a recent study by Accenture. Because of this gap, many employers will likely consider an alternate option to gain skilled workers: rehiring former employees.

Employees may be rehired for very different reasons. Maybe they were laid off due to a company’s financial situation, but not because they weren’t a valued employee. Or perhaps they were let go unfairly and a company realized its mistake. Maybe, just maybe, they were fired but fixed whatever caused them to be fired in the first place. Regardless of the reason, the question remains: Is this a positive trend or a recipe for disaster? Let’s examine.

Firing — and rehiring

Firings and rehirings can have a major effect on the employees in question. Since George Steinbrenner’s passing last week, many have commented about his tendency as a coach to treat employees rudely and fire them, then reconsider and hire them back soon after. Most wouldn’t argue that  many of his firings were impulsive. Steinbrenner, who reportedly made 20 managerial hirings and firings in 23 seasons, even admitted he was often unreasonable in his employee dealings.

Other organizations, like the Red Cross,  recently rehired two fired employees who complained about the heat during a blood drive, amid union talks. And an ex-employee who worked for the City of Fort Worth for years alleges she was wrongly fired after whistleblowing — what would happen if she was hired back?

What about rehiring laid off employees?

While it’s true that the decision to lay off employees is generally not a hot-headed game time decision a la Steinbrenner, layoffs still create unrest with laid off employees as well as remaining staff — and can leave a lingering bitterness in both camps toward company leadership. So what happens when you rehire employees post-layoffs?

Pros of rehiring former employees

Aside from the obvious — that rehiring employees is giving someone a job who needs to support themselves or a family, rehiring employees can have many other benefits.

Employee morale – If employees see that their employer is actively working to bring back employees, it can have a positive effect on morale — and it can bring people back together who formerly worked well as a team.

Training – Rehired employees understand the company culture, and employers don’t have to retrain them. Even if company structure has changed somewhat since they left, you’re likely looking at a quick brush-up versus a training overhaul.

New perspective — Time may actually have not just healed all wounds — but may have enabled both the person or people who let an employee go, and that employee, get away from a negative situation, gain some perspective, and learn from mistakes made. Even if the situation ended on a neutral or positive note, time away in which a former employee has had a chance to pursue other interests, hobbies, and skills may benefit not only them and their place in the organization, but also their employer, once he or she is brought back into the fold.

The HIRE Act — What it Means to You

If you’re an employer rehiring currently unemployed former employees — or an employer hiring any unemployed worker in general — you could benefit from a new tax incentive. One of the major benefits to employers who hire unemployed workers comes in the form of two new tax benefits that are part of the Hiring Incentives to Restore Employment (HIRE) Act. The two major parts of the act state:

  1. Employers who hire unemployed workers this year (after Feb. 3, 2010 and before Jan. 1, 2011) may qualify for a 6.2-percent payroll tax incentive, in effect exempting them from their share of Social Security taxes on wages paid to these workers after March 18, 2010.
  2. For each worker retained for at least a year, businesses may claim an additional general business tax credit, up to $1,000 per worker, when they file their 2011 income tax returns.

Find out more about the HIRE act and what it may mean for your business (video).

Cons of rehiring former employees

As much as rehiring a former employee can have positive effects, things can just as easily swing the other way — making a situation less than happy for rehired employees, employees who haven’t been let go, and company leadership.

Resentment – If things ended on a sour note, rehiring former employees can be complicated — and may not work out well in the long run. Even if an employer did everything they could to ease the stress of the situation, an employee may harbor resentment and bitter feelings, and those feelings may have grown stronger since they left the organization.

Current employee backlash — Employees who watched someone else leave and then come back may become jealous because a rehired employee is now getting work they were handling and returning “without paying their dues” as a new employee would. After all, remaining employees are often the ones left picking up the extra work when a company downsizes.

Short-term success – It’s important to keep in mind that even if an employee is willing to come back, they may only be accepting the job because they really need one (and are still looking for something better). This is where “onboarding” a rehired employee may help (see below).

If you’re going to rehire

If you do choose to rehire laid off employees, there are some things you can do to avoid the potential pitfalls listed above and ensure it’s as smooth a transition as possible.

Claudio Fernández-Aráoz, senior adviser at global executive search firm Egon Zehnder International, offers employers a few tips; namely, to clearly communicate to the rest of the company the reasons for hiring back a former employee; sufficiently brief a former employee about the company’s current situation and present very clear expectations; and to follow up, at least quarterly, with the returning employee to make sure he or she is adjusting well.

Would you rehire a former employee? What pros or cons would you add?

Hot Off the Press: Download Your Free Mid-Year Job Forecast 2010 Here

July 1st, 2010 Comments off

In Q2 2010, we saw improvements in the nation’s hiring outlook, and we cautiously cheered a little. But this time around, we may want to grab the nearest vuvuzela and blow it in excitement. (Or, uh, not.) Because while hiring in the second half of 2010 is likely to mirror the first half of the year in many ways, CareerBuilder and USA Today’s mid-year nationwide survey of more than 2,500 hiring and HR managers and more than 4,400 workers also shows that  the economy is projected to trend upward in comparison to last year at this time — and is on par with last quarter’s positive changes.

How have things changed from one year ago?

All things considered, employer behaviors and mindsets have shifted considerably from last year at this time. Forty-one percent of employers say they plan to hire between the months of July – December 2010, and employers project that in Q3 2010 specifically, they:

  • Will add full-time, permanent headcount (21 percent)
  • Will not make changes in staff size (65 percent)
  • Will downsize staff (8 percent)
  • Are undecided on staff size changes (6 percent)

One year ago, we saw that most employers expected their staff levels to remain the same as recruiting patterns held steady and job losses trended downward. Similar to this year’s numbers, 68 percent of employers didn’t anticipate any change in their full-time, permanent headcount, but in contrast, only 15 percent expected to increase staff levels (18 percent actually did). Fifteen percent decreased headcount, which is almost twice the percentage of hiring and HR managers who project a decrease in headcount in Q3 2010.

In Q3 2009, many employers were also reporting plans to postpone start dates for job offers, put mandatory furloughs into place, and institute pay cuts and hiring freezes. Today, although we’re still not completely out of the woods, we’re beginning to see a bit of daylight.

How have things changed from last quarter?

The number of employers who added full-time, permanent headcount in Q2 2010 was slightly ahead of what was originally forecasted in the survey, continuing a trend of actual hiring beating projected hiring.

In Q2 2010:

  • 24 percent of employers reported they increased their full-time, permanent staff in the second quarter (up from 18 percent year over year and up 1 percent from Q1 2010).
  • 11 percent decreased headcount (an improvement from 17 percent last year and 12 percent in Q1 2010).
  • 64 percent reported no change in their number of full-time, permanent employees.
  • 1 percent were undecided.

“The survey indicates that we’ll see sustainable new job growth through the remainder of the year, but it will be absent of any dramatic shifts,” said Matt Ferguson, CareerBuilder CEO.

Compensation Outlook

Fifteen percent of employers reported they instituted pay cuts at their organizations in the last 12 months.  Of these employers, 28 percent were restoring pay levels in the first half of the year, 18 percent in the latter half and 25 percent in 2011 and 2012.  Twenty-nine percent were unsure if and when pay would be restored to previous levels.

For Q3 2010 specifically:

  • 42 percent of employers anticipate no change
  • 37 percent expect there will be an increase of 1 to 3 percent
  • 12 percent expect to see an increase of 4 to 10 percent
  • 3 percent expect a decrease
  • 1 percent anticipate an increase of 11 percent or more

Three trends to watch for in the second half of 2010

1. Emerging Jobs – Employers are looking to fill positions relatively new to the work force. Twenty-four percent of employers said they are recruiting for positions in social media, green energy, cyber security, global relations and health care reform.

2. Changing Jobs – Employers are implementing measures to retain top performers. This is good, because according to the forecast, 25 percent of all workers plan to leave their organizations in the next 12 months.

3. Shortage of Skilled Labor — One-in-five employers reported that, despite an abundant labor pool, they still have positions for which they can’t find qualified candidates.

Unhappy Employees

Many workers are re-evaluating their employment situations — and realizing they’re not too happy with their current employer.

  • Twenty-five percent of workers reported they have a worse opinion of their employer in the wake of the recession. Fourteen percent have a better opinion and 61 percent stayed the same.
  • Twenty-nine percent of workers plan to pursue new job opportunities when the economy shows more improvement.  As mentioned earlier, a quarter of all workers plan to leave their jobs over the next 12 months.

Why the dissatisfaction?

Several factors influenced these decisions, but many appear related to the recession.

  • 30 percent of workers reported feeling over-worked, feeling the climate changed in their work environment and harboring resentment over other workers being laid off.
  • One-third of workers (33 percent) reported they feel overqualified for their current jobs
  • 23 percent stated that a lack of interesting work was one of the main motivators for changing employers.

What can you do as an employer to retain employees?

When asked what their employers could do to retain them as employees, workers cited the following:

  1. Increased compensation is the No. 1 thing workers want.
  2. If salary increases aren’t possible, workers point to employee recognition as the next best thing.
  3. Third in line, workers want the company to set realistic performance expectations and manageable workloads, and to take the time to evaluate their potential and discuss career paths.
  4. Investments in training and the company showing an ability to adapt were also mentioned.

To get in-depth survey results broken down by industry, region, and company size, as well as further predictions for Q3 2010, you can download the complete Q3 Forecast here.

Note: Totals may not equal 100 percent due to rounding.

5 Tips For Overworked Fathers to Better Balance Work and Family Life — Just in Time for Father’s Day

June 16th, 2010 Comments off

A father working on his laptop while at home with his kids

This Sunday is Father’s Day, and while it’s a great excuse to spoil dads everywhere with the latest gadgets, grill supplies, or bacon of the month club memberships, a little extra quality time with Dad might be in order this year, in light of results from CareerBuilder’s annual Father’s Day survey.

Survey results among 800 working fathers who are employed full-time showed that a still-struggling economy is causing many working dads to experience more stress, more work — and, not surprisingly, less time spent with their families.

Why the stress?

  • One in ten working dads said their spouse or significant other has become unemployed in the last 12 months, with 50 percent of those dads indicating it’s causing stress at home.
  • Forty-two percent of working dads said they are the sole providers in their household
  • Nine percent of working fathers say they have taken on a second job in the last 12 months to provide for their family.

Office overtime on overdrive

As many of you know firsthand, leaner staffs have led to fewer people handling a higher volume of work. This has made it more difficult for working fathers to achieve a healthy work/life balance, as many are stuck at the office working longer hours — and less time with their kids.

But just how many hours?

  • Sixty-three percent of working dads said they work more than 40 hours per week.
  • Three in ten (31 percent) working dads who take work home reported they typically bring work home five days a week or more.
  • Thirty percent bring work home on the weekends.

And how much less time with their kids?

  • Close to four in ten (37 percent) of working dads said they spend two hours or less with their children each work day.
  • More than three in ten (35 percent) reported they missed two or more significant events in their child’s life due to work in the last year.

How to be a better juggler

These are bleak statistics, but as Mary Delaney, one of CareerBuilder’s own busy working mothers, has said, there are things you can do to better balance work and family. and now, Jason Ferrara, VP Corporate Marketing at CareerBuilder and a father of two, shares his tips for working dads everywhere to better manage the delicate balancing act of providing for one’s family — and being there as a partner and a father.

“Especially in tough times, working dads have to be more creative and strategic to successfully juggle both work and family commitments,” said Jason Ferrara, VP Corporate Marketing at CareerBuilder and father of two.  “Employers understand the importance of working dads’ time away from the office and continue to place an emphasis on work/life balance through benefits that encourage employees to better manage their schedules. However, year over year, we find that nearly half of working dads do not take advantage of the flexible work arrangements offered to them.”

I’m not suggesting getting Dad a juggling set for Father’s Day (though I’m not not suggesting it, either), but the following tips are designed to help working Dads more effectively juggle their professional and personal lives. After all, although our multitudes of work and life commitments won’t necessarily go away, learning to prioritize them is a strong start.

Ferrara recommends the following tips for working dads navigating through difficult economic times:

  1. Keep everyone in the mix. Remember that communication is a two-way street.  Besides just listening to what is going on in your family’s lives, talk about what is going on in your office, so everyone understands why you are away or have to do some work when you are home.
  2. Learn to say no. In addition to actual work, sometimes activities associated with your job can take a toll on your free time. Determine what additional activities you can turn down and which are necessary so that you can free up more of your time outside of the office.
  3. Develop a master family calendar. Add every family member’s schedule to one master calendar so there are no surprises.  Also, save vacation days for important events and talk to your supervisor about flexible work arrangements.
  4. Play now, work later. Put down your Blackberry and avoid checking e-mails until after your children have gone to sleep.
  5. Plan a family event in your office. Take advantage of the summer months when school is out and the office may be less hectic by scheduling a kid-friendly potluck or other event with co-workers and their families.

What’s worked for you?

Do you have a solution that’s helped you better manage your work and family lives to add? Let us know in comments — We’d love to hear about it!

Job Creation Up, Unemployment Rate Down (But There’s a Catch…)

June 4th, 2010 Comments off

And why wouldn’t there be?

Well, it’s the first Friday of June, and while it may just be a coincidence that there are free donuts available on the very same day the latest Employment Situation report is released, it is awfully convenient: After seeing these numbers, you might be in need of some comfort food.  

Because while jobs did grow this month, they fell far short of analysts’ predictions. And while the unemployment rate did go down, it’s largely because many unemployed workers gave up their job searches. Here are the highlights: 

  • Total nonfarm payroll employment grew by 431,000 in May (driven by the hiring of 411,000 temporary Census workers)
  • Private employers added just 41,000 jobs in May – down sharply from 218,000 in April and the fewest since January.
  • The unemployment rate decreased from 9.9 percent to 9.7 percent (which seems like good news until you realize that it reflects that people gave up searching for work.)
  • The underemployment rate (those who’ve given up looking for work and part-timers who would rather be working full time) fell from 17.1 percent in April to 16.6 percent in May.
  • All told, 15 million people were unemployed in May.

Understandably, this month’s report is being called “disappointing,” and, indeed, it is; however, I’m kind of trying to view this report like I did the ending of “Lost” (no spoilers here, I promise).  While both fell short of my expectations and left a lot of unanswered questions, I also kind of saw this coming all along…That is to say, there’s nothing to me all that shocking in the report.

After all, the overall takeaways from the report remain are the same as they’ve been in previous months:  Private employers are still hesitant to bring on full-time workers, jobs are still being added – but still at a frustratingly slow pace – and it still looks like it’s going to be a while before there is significant relief for the roughly 15 million unemployed Americans.

Categories: industry news Tags: ,

Increased Listings on CareerBuilder.com Point to a Tightening Job Market

June 3rd, 2010 Comments off

Leading up to tomorrow’s unemployment report, CareerBuilder CEO Matt Ferguson appeared on CNBC’s “Squawk Box” this morning to discuss regional job market trends based on CareerBuilder.com listings. 

Regional Job Market Trends
Among the highlights of Ferguson’s interview:

  • In terms of jobs opening up, there has been a continual, but moderate increase of job postings on CareerBuilder.com, indicating that employers are starting to hire again
  • Big cities, like New York and San Francisco, are seeing the most improvement in terms of the number of jobs available
  • General positions, such as those in the sales, marketing, healthcare and hospitality, are making the biggest comebacks right now
  • The Silicon Valley job market is also tightening up, with IT execs claiming they are having a hard time filling open positions

New Tool to Help Employers
Ferguson also discussed the official launch of hireINSIDER, a new tool from CareerBuilder with benefits for both job seekers and employers. According to the press release:

hireINSIDER also benefits employers who may not have the time or resources to respond to an increasing amount of applications in a tough economy.  By providing the feedback that job seekers need, it helps to alleviate the negative impact that a lack of response can have on a company’s employment brand.  Employers can also utilize hireINSIDER’s technology to gain a better understanding of the demographics of their applicant pool.   

Tomorrow, the BLS releases it’s monthly employment report. Check back here for highlights from the report.

One Third of Workers Plan to Look for New Jobs When the Economy Picks Up

May 13th, 2010 Comments off

True story.  According to a new CareerBuilder survey of more than 2,700 employers and 4,800 workers nationwide, 33 percent of workers said they are likely to start looking for a new job when the economy picks up. 

(Could you imagine losing an entire third of your employee base? That would be like, say your staff was the Jonas Brothers, okay? And Joe Jonas suddenly up and leaves to join another band.  Consider the toll that would take on the quality of…Okay, maybe that’s not the world’s greatest analogy, but the point is, it would be bad.)

Anyway, in the same survey, nearly the same amount of employers (32 percent) say they are concerned about losing their high performing workers in the second quarter of this year (as, apparently, they should be). 

What Makes Good Employees Stray?
Dissatisfaction with pay (32 percent), career advancement opportunities (27 percent) and work/life balance (22 percent) were the top reasons employees gave for wanting to leave their current jobs, an increase from the 29 percent, 24 percent and 20 percent, respectively, who said the same in 2009.  

The increased levels of dissatisfaction could be attributed that increased workloads, longer hours and fewer resources related to the recession may be contributing to higher job dissatisfaction.

What Makes Good Employees Stay?
Understanding what you’re employees want is the first step to keeping them motivated and happy and retaining them.  After competitive pay and benefits, the following incentives topped hospitality workers’ “most wanted” list of employer offerings:

  1. Good career advancement opportunities (60 percent)
  2. A good work culture (57 percent)
  3. Company’s financial stability and growth potential (52 percent)
  4. Training and learning opportunities (47 percent)
  5. Less stressful work environment (45 percent)
  6. Flexible work arrangements (43 percent)
  7. Sense of ownership in their position, that they can make a difference (42 percent)
  8. Camaraderie, more family-like work environment (34 percent)

Asked what they were doing to hold on to top talent and reduce turnover, employers listed the following:

  • Offering more flexible work arrangements
  • Investing more in employee training
  • Promising future raises or promotions
  • Offering more performance-based incentives, such as trips and bonuses
  • Providing a higher title without a higher salary

 What is your company doing to keep Joe Jonas in the band retain workers?

April’s Job Growth Surpasses Economists’ Predictions

May 11th, 2010 Comments off

In case you missed the BLS’ employment report released Friday, check out a quick recap in the First Business video below, where Brent Rasmussen, President of North America at CareerBuilder, talks about the highlights of the report and what it means for the current and future state of the job market:

Among the highlights of the report:

  • Employment rose by 290,000 in April, surpassing the 185,000 predicted by economists
  • The unemployment rate, which hit 9.9 percent, increased due to the number of people who, previously discouraged from looking for jobs, have resumed their job searches (the unemployment rate only captures those who are actively looking for jobs)
  • Hourly wages increased slightly last month, to $22.47 from $22.46
  • The average work week increased to 34.1 hours from 34 hours in March
  • The manufacturing industry sector experienced the biggest boost in growth, adding 44,000 jobs; followed by temporary help services (26,000); health care (20,100); construction (14,000); retail (12,400); mining (7,000); computer systems design (7,000) and federal government (66,000 – due largely to temporary workers hired for the census) 
  • The transportation and warehousing and information companies industry sectors all cut jobs last month

While recovery is well underway, its status as a slow one has yet to change. With the economy growing at just a 3.2 percent pace in the first quarter of this year, it has a long way to go to catch up for the 6 percent to 8 percent per quarter gains it needs in order for employers to start hiring significantly.

A Working Mother at CareerBuilder Offers Six Tips to Better Balance Work and Family

May 5th, 2010 Comments off

Mary Delaney, President of PersonifiedYou may have a dozen reasons to celebrate Mother’s Day this Sunday, but here’s one you may not have thought of — a tough economy. A recent CareerBuilder survey of 604 women, employed full-time with children 18 and under living in the household, shows that working moms may be feeling more stressed — and less appreciated — in our current economic climate.

Working moms, many of them recently tasked with the responsibility of keeping their families afloat due to unemployed spouses or other financial issues, have had to become more resourceful than ever.

According to survey results:

  • Twelve percent of working moms said their spouse or significant other has become unemployed in the last 12 months, with two-thirds (67 percent) indicating that it is causing stress at home.
  • Thirty-six percent of working moms said they are the sole provider for their household.
  • Nearly one-in-ten (9 percent) have taken on a second job in the last 12 months to provide for their family.

Work/life balance — what’s that again?

As a result, achieving a work/life balance can be a lot of work in itself, as moms are working more hours — which often translates to less time at home with the family:

  • Forty-three percent of working moms work more than 40 hours per week.
  • More than one-third (34 percent) who take work home reported they typically bring work home three days a week or more.
  • Twenty-three percent bring work home on the weekends.
  • Nearly one-in-five (18 percent) of working moms said they spend two hours or less with their children each work day.
  • Nearly three-in-ten (29 percent) reported they missed two or more significant events in their child’s life due to work in the last year.

So what can working moms do to achieve more balance?

CareerBuilder’s Mary Delaney, a working mother herself, offers other working moms her thoughts and tips:

“The tough economy has taken its toll on family units and working moms are challenged with doing more with less time,” said Mary Delaney, President of Personified, CareerBuilder’s talent consulting division, and mother of three.

“What we’re seeing from these moms is a great deal of resourcefulness and resilience as they provide for their families.  While they may not be able to spend as much time with their children as they would like, working moms are making the most of the time they do have and getting creative in work arrangements.”

Delaney recommends the following tips to help working moms navigate through difficult economic times:

  1. Talk to other working moms. Many families are in the same boat as you and having a support network is essential to your personal and professional sanity.  Getting tips from other working moms on how they juggle personal and professional commitments can be a big help.
  2. Seek out flexible work arrangements. The vast majority of working moms who have taken advantage of flexible work arrangements said it hasn’t negatively impacted their careers.  In fact, one-in-five (21 percent) said it has actually helped their careers.
  3. Have a plan. Structure in your life will save you time, stress and mental energy.  Keep one calendar for business and family commitments to avoid double-booking. Set up a schedule for chores, homework, family activities, playtime, etc.
  4. Take advantage of work perks. Companies offer a variety of perks such as wellness benefits, company discounts on entertainment venues, etc.  Talk to your HR department and see what is available to help save money on monthly expenses and fun family outings.
  5. Make the most of your family time. When you’re home, it’s all about them.  Wait until after the children go to bed before checking email or finishing up that presentation.
  6. Schedule some “me time.” Working moms need to take care of themselves too.  Put actual time on the calendar for an hour or more of doing something you enjoy such as going to the gym, taking a walk, reading, etc.

Working moms (or dads) — any tips to add that have helped your family get things back in order?

Ready for Earth Day 2010? Majority of Employers Making an Effort to Be More Environmentally Conscious, Finds New Survey

April 21st, 2010 Comments off

Man in green suitAs many of you are likely aware, the 40th anniversary of Earth Day is tomorrow, April 22. Around the world, people are taking part in everything from planting gardens, to clean water projects, to climate rallies, to people-powered smoothie making to celebrate and raise awareness. The White House is making a splash by dedicating five days of events to celebrate Earth Day.

In addition, Vice President Joe Biden announced earlier today that $452 million in Recovery Act funding will go toward energy-efficient building retrofits in 25 communities. These 25 projects will leverage an estimated $2.8 billion from other sources, which will go toward retrofitting hundreds of thousands of U.S. homes and businesses in the next three years.

Are businesses ready?

So, with all this retrofitting to come — and with many job seekers seeking out socially responsible companies — it’s exciting to hear that many companies are paying attention and have taken steps — or plan to take steps — to become more environmentally friendly, as indicated by a new CareerBuilder survey of more than 2,700 hiring managers. As Kimberly, a recent commenter on The Hiring Site, wrote:

“Our job descriptions have been revamped to instill a “day-in-the-life” of… to example our culture. We also include our organization’s work/life balance, community involvement and our “green” initiatives.”

According to survey results, one in ten employers say they have added “green jobs,” otherwise known as environmentally-focused positions, in the last 12 months, despite the tough economy, and nearly 10 percent plan to add more in 2010.

Which region’s leading the pack?

Employers in the Northeast (14 percent) added the most “green,” or environmentally friendly, jobs over the last year, followed by 11 percent in the South, 10 percent in the West and 9 percent in the Midwest.

Of those surveyed, which industry’s most green?

Retail led the industries surveyed, with 24 percent indicating they have added green jobs over the last 12 months. What percentage of other industries indicated they’ve done the same?

  • Eighteen percent of transportation and utilities
  • Fifteen percent of sales
  • Fourteen percent of IT and manufacturing
  • Ten percent of financial services

Companies are not only adding environmentally friendly positions within their organizations, but they are also strengthening their current in-house green programs. Nearly 70 percent of companies say they have added programs to be more environmentally conscious in the last year. The most popular green programs include:

  • Recycling (47 percent)
  • Using less paper (43 percent)
  • Controlling lighting (40 percent)
  • Powering down computers at the end of the day (29 percent)
  • Purchasing office supplies made from recycled materials (25 percent)

“Green opportunities continue to grow as companies take advantage of increased government programs designed to spur job growth and reduce the country’s carbon footprint,” said Rosemary Haefner, vice president of human resources for CareerBuilder. “The green category has expanded over the past few years and job seekers are finding environmentally friendly positions in virtually every industry and at every job level.”

What’s going on in the marketplace?

The following are some examples of green job opportunities that can be found at Going Green Jobs, CareerBuilder’s site designed to connect green employers and job seekers:

1. Hydrologist — The median annual income is $78,458.*
2. Solar energy system designer –The median annual income is $65,160.
3.Wildlife biologist – The median annual income is $38,301.
4. Science teacher – The median annual income of kindergarten, elementary, middle and secondary school teachers ranges from $51,373 to 57,537.
5. Waste management engineer — The median annual income is $89,067.
6. Environmental attorney — The median annual income for attorneys specializing in construction, real estate and land use is $99,579.
7. Urban planner — The media annual income is $65,768.

* Salary information from CBsalary.com.

What are you doing for Earth Day 2010?

What is your company doing to take part in Earth Day — or what has your business done recently to become more environmentally friendly? What kind of an impact is it having on your business and on your employees?

If you are looking for ideas of service projects in your local area, check out the Earth Day 2010 list.

How Are Workers Spending Their Tax Refunds?

April 7th, 2010 Comments off

Woman stressing out over billsMany workers have likely been saving their pennies for Apple’s iPad, lamenting steep carry-on luggage fees they may now be incurring en route to this summer’s family reunion, or figuring out how they will fit higher gas prices into that “big coffee pots” road tour. But wait! Tax refunds are coming! Problem solved… right? Not so fast.

The reality is much less fun than giant coffee pot pours tours. As it turns out, more than half (56 percent) of workers report they will use the money they get from their tax refunds to pay off the bills that have been stacking up, according to a new CareerBuilder survey of more than 5,200 workers. This seems to be in line with what a recent CNNMoney.com article suggests workers use tax refund money for.

Although the majority are planning to use tax refunds to tackle bills, some are planning to use their refunds (or at least that which remains after paying off said bills) in other ways.

What do they plan to do with the money?

  • Put it into savings – 34 percent
  • Make home improvements – 12 percent
  • Go on vacation – 11 percent
  • Pay back money I owe to people – 8 percent
  • Invest it – 7 percent
  • Buy a car – 2 percent

How We’re Living

In the past, many workers have likely been able to spend tax refund money on indulgences or “fun” things. In light of a struggling economy, however, tax refunds have become a needed income boost for cash-strapped workers. Nearly eight in ten workers (78 percent) said they currently live paycheck to paycheck, up from 61 percent who said the same in May 2009.

In addition, economic pressures have resulted in some workers downsizing their investments to help make ends meet. Nearly one in five (17 percent) reported they reduced their 401(k) contributions in the last year.

“Workers’ wallets are still feeling the ripple effects of the past year,” said Rosemary Haefner, vice president of human resources for CareerBuilder. “In addition to scaling back their investments and cutting back on expenses, workers are using their tax refunds to help supplement their incomes. Our survey indicates that more workers plan to spend their refunds on everyday expenses than on savings or other items.”

But, if you’re one of the lucky workers who is scraping enough money together to buy an iPad, at least you can take comfort in some free apps to go along with it.

Are We There Yet? Latest Employment Report Shows Largest Job Gain in Three Years

April 2nd, 2010 Comments off

With 162,000 jobs added in March, the nation’s economy saw its largest job gain in three years, according to the latest Employment Situation report, released by the BLS today.

While the unemployment rate remained at 9.7 percent (and will likely stay that way for a while), the increase is a sign that economic recovery is sustainable, and healing in the job market has definitely, finally, offically BEGUN! begun to turn a corner

Not exactly the kind of good news that warrants a ticker-tape parade, but hey, I’ll take it.

Highlights from the report include the following:

  • Employers added 162,000 jobs in March, the most since the recession began but below analysts’ expectations of 190,000. The total includes 48,000 temporary workers hired for the U.S. Census.
  • Private employers added 123,000 jobs, the most since May 2007.
  • Among industries: Manufacturers added 17,000 jobs, for a third straight month of gains. Meanwhile, temporary help services added 40,000 jobs; health care added 37,000; leisure and hospitality added 22,000; and the construction industry added 15,000.
  • The average work week increased to 34 hours from 33.9 (a positive sign as most employers are likely to work current employees longer before they hire new workers).
  • Average hourly earnings fell by two cents to $22.47, but average weekly earnings rose by about $3 to $629.37, partly reflecting the longer work week.
  • The “underemployment” rate – made up of Americans who are working part-time but prefer full-time work and discouraged workers who have given up searching for jobs – ticked up to 16.9 percent from 16.8 percent.

Latest Job Forecast Supports BLS Findings
Further evidence of the recovering jobs market can be found in CareerBuilder and USA Today’s latest quarterly job forecast, which showed that for the third consecutive quarter, more employers plan to increase their headcount in the next three months, while fewer will cut staffs.

This morning, CareerBuilder CEO Matt Ferguson appeared on CNBC’s SquawkBox to discuss the results of the forecast and what they mean for the current state of the job market and the economy:

BLS Experts Answer Consumer Questions in Live Chat
Finally, the BLS conducted its first live web chat this morning devoted to the employment report.  You can see of  full transcript of the chat here, or continue reading for chat highlights:

This morning, the BLS held a live web chat with a panel of experts from both the Current Population Survey (CPS) and the Current Employment Statistics (CES) programs on hand to answer users’ questions.  Below are some of the highlights of that chat, with user questions in bold:

 Is there an estimate for how many census workers will be hired for the current census and when those hires will occur? Are these employees full, or part-time? How does the BLS treat these employees? Are they counted as “regular” employees? Current information on the census intermittent worker impact on CES estimates can be found on www.bls.gov/ces/cescensusworkers.pdf. To be considered employed in the CES survey, workers need to receive pay for any time during their pay period including the 12th of the month. Workers getting paid for just one hour would be considered employed. The CES survey cannot distinguish between full- and part-time workers. For future hiring expectations for census intermittent workers, you should consult the Bureau of the Census or visit http://www.census.gov/

Why have people on extended unemployment benefits dropped by over 50% since the beginning of the year while those on EUC are up? BLS does not produce the data on unemployment benefits. The Employment and Training Administration is the source of that data. Information is available on the Department of Labor website at http://ows.doleta.gov/unemploy/claims_arch.asp.

Why was the weather effect in February not larger given the severity of the snow storms and past similar storms, i.e. Jan. 1996? It is not possible to determine specifically how weather impacted employment estimates from data reported through the CES survey. The dynamics of the economy, as well as differences in weather systems, vary.

What states are enjoying a growth in employment? Details on statewide job growth can be found in the Regional and State Employment and Unemployment news release issued most recently on March 26, 2010. In February, nonfarm payroll employment decreased in 27 states and the District of Columbia and increased in 23 states. The largest over-the-month increases in employment occurred in Florida (+26,300), followed by New York (+5,800), Alabama (+5,600), Wisconsin (+5,200), Nevada (+5,100), and South Carolina (+5,000). Nevada experienced the largest over-the-month percentage increase in employment (+0.5 percent), followed by Florida and New Hampshire (+0.4 percent each) and Alabama, South Carolina, and Vermont (+0.3 percent each). Over the year, nonfarm employment decreased in 49 states and increased in 1 state and the District of Columbia.

Unemployment rates for Metropolitan Statistical Areas (MSAs) and cities are issued in a separate release, several weeks after the Regional and State news release, cited above. Currently, data is available for January 2010

Why is this report released on Good Friday? The BLS news release schedule for major economic indicators, including the Employment Situation, is announced prior to the beginning of the calendar year, allowing advance notice to all users, and is rarely subject to change. BLS schedules news releases any day the Federal government is scheduled to be open, based on when data will become final.

Why is the civilian non institutional population listed as 237,159? The civilian non institutional population is 237,159,000. The figure excludes persons under the age of 16, members of the Armed Forces, and those in institutions such as prisons.

Does the payroll data differentiate between part time and full time? The payroll data does not differentiate between part- and full-time workers.  The CPS survey does have employment by full- and part-time workers.   

How are the adjustments to prior months reports determined? The CES survey is a voluntary survey, and respondents report employment for their pay period that includes the 12th of the month. BLS first produces estimates with less than full response. We collect data on a continuous basis and update our estimates during the 2 months following initial release. In addition to additional sample, BLS also recalculates seasonal factors using the latest estimates.  Once a year, BLS resets its employment level (for March) to an actual count and revises seasonally adjusted estimates back 5 years. The latest of these benchmark update was for March 2009, released on February 5, 2010.

Does the BLS make available the raw data results of the surveys? The mission of the Bureau of Labor Statistics (BLS) is to collect, process, analyze, and disseminate essential statistical data to the American public, the U.S. Congress, other Federal agencies, State and local governments, business, and labor. In order to maintain credibility and trust with our survey respondents, confidentiality protections for our data are essential. Protecting the confidentiality of data is central to accomplishing the BLS mission. More information can be found on this subject at http://www.bls.gov/bls/confidentiality.htm.

What are the standard errors on the employment number and unemployment rate? At the 90 percent level of confidence, the standard error on the change in CPS employment is about +/- 400,000, and the standard error on the change in the unemployment rate is about +/- 0.2 percentage point. For the payroll survey, at the 90 percent level of confidence, the standard error on the monthly change in nonfarm employment is about +/- 100,000.

Who do you survey to get the temp employment number? The CES survey samples Temporary Help companies to estimate employment in Temp Help.  Our sample includes firms of all sizes.

When will the data from the 2010 Displaced Worker Survey supplement be available for download? Those data should be available in the fall of this year.

Does the BLS break out employment by size of firm? The BLS does break out employment by size of firm from the Quarterly Census of Employment and Wages program.  For more details see:  www.bls.gov/cew

How are independent contractors and the self-employed counted? In the household survey, independent contractors and the self employed are counted as employed if they are operating their business. If their businesses are closed and they are actively seeking other employment, they would be considered unemployed.

Why is March selected as the bench mark month as opposed to other months? March is selected for the annual benchmark, because it has less seasonal variation than most months and no holidays.

Where can I find more specific information about the BLS’ unemployment calculation methodologies? You can find a number of documents describing the concepts and methods used in the unemployment calculations at: http://stats.bls.gov/cps/documentation.htm#ces_cps

What are some of the common reasons why the numbers in a prior months’ report could be revised? CES estimates may revise from additional sample received, corrections to previously reported data, and recalculation of seasonal adjustment factors using the most current data.

Do you have data regarding individuals working beyond the age of retirement? You might be interested to see a recent piece that Emy Sok published on older workers http://www.bls.gov/opub/ils/summary_10_04/older_workers.htm

U.S. Employers Dish on Their Best Sources of Hire in 2009 and Job Opening Outlook for 2010

March 23rd, 2010 Comments off

Someone whispering to someone else, cupped handsWell, kind of. If you’re imagining a bunch of ladies sitting around spilling their deepest, darkest employee secrets a la “The View,” replace that image with an independent report obtained with survey results from 41 companies and representing a total of 176,000 positions and 1.8 million U.S.-based employees in CareerXroads’ 9th Annual Source of Hire Study.

Still, the study’s findings are pretty interesting — and include survey results about how many companies plan to fill job openings this year,best sources of hire, and information on how companies can use and leverage this sources-of-hire data.

A couple of highlights from the study:

Best sources of hire

  • According to survey results, U.S. employers said referrals, career sites and job boards accounted for the majority of their new external hires in 2009 (62.2 percent).
  • Career sites and job boards accounted for 35.5 percent of new external hires in the U.S. in 2009.
  • CareerBuilder was ranked as the No. 1 source of hire within the job board category at 41.6 percent compared to 11.6 percent for its largest competitor.

Majority report more job openings this year

  • As far as job openings, almost half (48 percent) of company respondents say they plan to grow this year, while 37.9 percent of respondents say they will hold steady this year.
  • Only 10.8 percent say they will fill fewer openings in 2010.

Ch-Ch-Ch-Changes

Although we strive not to self-promote on The Hiring Site, this survey reminded us that some of you who are not customers may not be aware of our T-E-A-M philosophy and the new solutions we’ve recently launched as a response to the changing job market. As we have evolved beyond just a job board, we’ve started offering a suite of human capital solutions like talent consulting, in-depth data analysis and talent flow tracking, niche industry job sites, social media brand management, outplacement services and more. If you want to learn more or get a brush-up on the solutions we’re working on with other customers, you can check them out here.

What Does It All Mean? Making Sense of the New Jobs, Healthcare Bills

March 22nd, 2010 Comments off

With the recent passing of two major bills, the jobs bill (signed by President Obama on March 18) and the healthcare bill (signed by the House of Representatives on Sunday),  The Hiring Site thought it important to educate our readers on the specifics of these bills and the implications they will have on you as an employer.  Below is a summary of each bill, what the passing of the bill means for you, and where to go for further information: 

The Jobs Bill – HIRE (Hiring Incentives to Restore Employment) Act

HIRE was signed by the president March 18th. This bill is written to positively affect investment both in equipment and hiring. Business investment in equipment ripples through the economy, affecting suppliers’ inventories and their ability to produce and fulfill orders. Waiving taxes and giving credits to business is intended to loosen some of the hiring barriers, especially in a tight economy where a hire is seen as an expense rather than an investment in future growth. The main areas of focus include:

  1. Waiving the 6.2 percent social security tax for each new worker until December 31, 2010
  2. Getting up to $1,000 in tax credit for each new worker on payroll
  3. Company can write off up to $250k of new equipment in 2010 rather than depreciate over several years

Based on CareerBuilder research, employers report two of their top initiatives for 2010 are replacing lower-performing employees and rehiring laid-off workers. Employers are focusing their hiring efforts on filling jobs that drive revenue, evidenced by the year-over-year increase in job postings in the following areas:

  • Business development posting are up 4 percent
  • Sales postings are up 11 percent
  • Marketing postings are up 40 percent
  • Government postings are up 16 percent
  • Education postings are up 18 percent
  • Entry level postings are up 47 percent

For further information and analysis…

The Healthcare Bill – The Health Care &  Education Affordability Reconciliation Act of 2010*

The healthcare legislation, as it is currently written, has elements taking effect both immediately through 2014 and beyond. Regardless, this bill will touch every business at some point and could have impact on hiring. The Congressional Budget Office (CBO) estimates 95 percent of legal residents will have insurance by 2019 under the current bill. The total cost of the bill is $940 billion over 10 years ,with $143 billion in deficit savings over the same time frame. The main points of the legislation include:

  • Immediate impact:  Health insurance companies barred from denying coverage to children with pre-existing conditions; children permitted to stay on parents’ insurance until their 26th birthday; indoor tanning tax of 10 percent
  • Effective in 2013:  New Medicare taxes go into effect for families with income over $250k and individuals over $200k; Medicare tax on “unearned” income such as dividends and interest; medical device excise tax imposed
  • Effective in 2014:  Insurance exchanges where individuals and companies can purchase health insurance will be created; subsidies begin for low- to middle-income people to purchase health insurance; employers with 50 or more employees must provide affordable health coverage or pay a fine up to $3k per employee; employers with fewer than 50 employees would be exempt from health care fines

The aging population continues to drive strong health care hiring numbers:

  • The health care industry has added over 631,000 jobs since the start of the recession.
  • Health care added 32,000 jobs in February 2010 alone
  • CareerBuilder experienced a 4 percent increase in health care postings in Q4 2009 focused on physician office jobs and home health care jobs.
  • More insured Americans will mean larger patient load driving the need for many different new health care roles.

For more information and resources, you can check out the following: 

*Based on the version of the bill passed by the House of Representatives Sunday, March 21st.

Employees Are on Smart Phones While Driving – But What’s An Employer Got to Do With It?

March 10th, 2010 Comments off

There are six words that, when used together, can cause a bit of anxiety (no, I’m not talking about So You Think You Can Dance?).

Consider this scenario: Your employee is rushing to get to work. He or she is driving a car, one hand on the wheel — and one hand on the smart phone. Every once in a while your employee anxiously glances down at the phone, anticipating the inevitable work correspondence. Your employee doesn’t have to wait long, because five minutes into the drive, you, the frazzled boss who’s up early and thinking about a project, decides to e-mail said employee, knowing full well your employee will check the message right away – and feel compelled to respond. You type those six very important words: What is the status on this?

You hit send.

This type of situation may be more of a problem than you realize. Whether you’re a boss who’s always connected and expects the same of your employees, or you’re an employee who feels pressured to be “on” at all times, even while driving – you may need to slow down a bit. According to the results of a new CareerBuilder survey of more than 5,200 workers, more than half (54 percent) of workers who have a smart phone or similar device said they check it when driving a vehicle — and many are risking safety on the road because they feel pressured to respond.

Which Industries are Most Connected On the Commute?

In comparing industries:

  • Sixty-six percent of sales workers used their smart phones while driving, more than any other group surveyed.
  • They were followed by  professional and business services workers (59 percent).
  • Health care workers were third in terms of industry use (50 percent).

How Bad Is It?

It’s bad enough that almost of quarter (21 percent) of workers say they check their mobile device every time it vibrates or beeps — but worse that 18 percent report they are required by their company to be accessible beyond office hours via mobile device. In addition, 14 percent of workers said they feel obligated to constantly stay in touch with work because of the current tough economy.

It’s true that the lines between work and home lives are often blurry at best due to our ability to be connected in so many ways and at all hours of the day. It’s important for bosses to keep in mind, however, that if employees are not at work and you require them to correspond or make work decisions, there’s a possibility you could be putting them in danger.

And while it’s also true that employees are not always in the precarious position of driving while texting or e-mailing, consider that your employees have personal lives just like you. By corresponding during off-hours, you may be forcing them to respond while they’re mid-first-date (and nervous to begin with), enjoying a Broadway show, praying, or even attending to other “personal business” — in the bathroom. Workers with smart phones said they are checking in with the office on their smart phones from virtually anywhere and everywhere, including:

  • During a meal:  62 percent
  • On vacation:  60 percent
  • While in the bathroom:  57 percent
  • Lying in bed at night:  50 percent
  • At a movie, play, or musical:  25 percent
  • On a date:  18 percent
  • Working out at the gym:  17 percent
  • At a child’s event of function:  17 percent
  • At church:  11 percent

Think Before You Hit “Send”

While sometimes communication outside of the office may be necessary, consider your options before contacting — and decide whether the message you’re communicating is important enough to hit “send” regardless of where your employee may be at that moment. And think of your frequency — are you abusing your power as an employer, as well as your employee’s time? Or are you acting in good faith?

“It is challenging for workers to maintain a good work/life balance when they are constantly connected to the office, so turning their devices off is important for their health and safety,” said Rosemary Haefner, vice president of human resources for CareerBuilder. “The lines between work and life can be very blurry these days – 17 percent of workers said they feel like their work day never ends because of technology connecting them to the office. To reduce burnout and avoid potentially risky behavior, workers should allot technology-free time when away from work.”

Consider the three tips below to help you and your employee to work together on a work/life balance:

  • Encourage employees to turn off the smart phone while driving. Not only is it illegal in many states, but using a mobile device while driving is dangerous to both your employee and others on the road. Let your employees know that if it’s necessary to leave his or her smart phone on and a conference call or other urgent matter comes up, you want them to pull over to safely handle the situation.
  • Help your employee create a backup plan: Help your employee plan to have an out-of-office message or voicemail at the ready, and arrange for them to leave contact information for others on your team familiar with your employee’s area of the business who are able to step in if needed. Alternately, arrange to handle business yourself if you’re able to in a sticky situation. That way, any emergency can be handled appropriately if your employee can’t get to it — and you’ll still be aware of what’s going on.
  • Have a personal policy in mind. What are your parameters for getting in touch with your employees on off-hours or while out of the office? Where do you draw the line — and if you don’t, consider whether there are ways you can modify your plan and communicate that out to your employees.

What’s your take on the issue — is it a problem or a necessary evil in our current work environment?

Latest Employment Report a Mix of Good and Bad (But Mostly Good) News

March 5th, 2010 Comments off

Anyone else looking forward to the day we can say that we’re actually out of the woods with the current financial crisis (if only so we can put a moratorium on the phrase “out of the woods”)?  

Well, we might have to hold out a little while longer, because as the latest employment report indicates, we’re, um…well, you know. Today, the Labor Department released its Employment Situation report for the month of February, and, as is often the case lately, there’s both good news and bad news.

The good news is that the number of jobs in February fell far below analysts’ expectations and that the unemployment rate did not go up. Despite this fact, the bad news, of course, is that unemployment is still at a remarkably high 9.7 percent and that employers cut 36,000 jobs.

Among the highlights of the report:

  •  Employers cut 36,000 jobs in February (below analysts’ expectation of 50,000), compared with 26,000 jobs shed in January.
  • Since the start of the recession in December 2007, the number of unemployed Americans has nearly doubled to 14.9 million and the economy has shed 8.4 million jobs.
  • The U.S. unemployment rate held at 9.7 percent in February, and nonfarm payroll employment dipped slightly (-36,000).
  • Severe winter weather in parts of the country may have affected payroll employment and hours; however, it is not possible to quantify precisely the net impact of the winter storms on these measures.
  • Looking at various industries: Temporary help services added 48,000 jobs, while Health Care also continued to trend upward in February. Construction and Information both fell, at 64,000 and 18,000 jobs lost, respectively, while both Manufacturing and Retail were essentially unchanged.

Despite the up-and-down numbers over the last few months (36,000 jobs shed in February…26,000 shed in January…109,000 shed in December… 64,000 added in November, etc.), conditions are stabilizing overall.

“The large declines are behind us,” said Joel Naroff of Joel Naroff Economic Advisors in a podcast interview with MarketWatch today, in reference to the job loss numbers.  Naroff added that the latest report gives a strong indication that, while we may not see strong job growth anytime soon, we will see positive growth.

In fact, employers are expected to add as many as 100,000 jobs a month later this year (and if President Obama okays the House’s new $15 billion plan to offer tax breaks to employers, it could further impact job growth in the coming months). 

Thoughts?

Categories: industry news Tags: ,

Millenials: Electric, and No Longer Youth

March 4th, 2010 Comments off

Eebbie Gibson's "Electric Youth" perfumeMillenials. Comprised of those born after 1980, or those 18-29 years old, they’re America’s newest generation.  (And it’d be more fun if they were called this, no?) But what else are we learning about them, particularly when it comes to the workplace? A new report aimed at Millenials attempts to answer some of our unanswered questions.

Who are Millenials?

Fifty million people currently fall into the “Millenials” category. Pew Research Center, a nonpartisan fact tank that provides information on the issues, attitudes and trends shaping America and the world, has just released a report called “Millenials: Confident. Connected. Open to Change.

The report, conducted by Pew Research Center’s “Social & Demographic Trends Project,” compares the values, attitudes and behaviors of Millenials with those of older adults, and seeks to shed some light on which formative experiences Millenials will carry throughout their life cycle. Among other findings, the report found that personality-wise, Millenials are confident, self-expressive, liberal, and upbeat, and are open to change.

Dissatisfied With Work Now — But Optimistic for the Future

Interestingly, although Millenials’ careers have been derailed — or at least detoured — with a recession, they are more upbeat than their elders about both their own economic futures and the state of the nation.

Having a high-paying career is cited by only 15 percent of 18- to 29-year-old respondents as one of the most important things in their lives, while things like a successful marriage and being a good parent rank much higher — even though unemployment for this age group is higher now than it has been in more than three decades.

Unemployed Millenials

  • Only 19 percent of unemployed Millenials say they have enough money to live the kind of live they want
  • 89 percent, however, believe they will have enough income in the future

Employed Millenials

  • Just 31 percent of employed Millenials reported making enough money to lead the kind of life they want — leaving 69 percent who are not satisfied.
  • They are less satisfied than previous generations; 46 percent of Gen Xers, for example, cite satisfaction with their income.
  • Among those employed Millenials dissatisfied with their income, 88 percent are confident that they will be able to earn enough in the future.

How They View Their Elders

They respect their elders. Surprised? According to the report:

“A majority say that the older generation is superior to the younger generation when it comes to moral values and work ethic.”

New Einsteins

This generation is also poised to become the most educated generation in American history — a trend which, according to the report, is driven largely by the demands of a modern knowledge-based economy, but also by the millions of 20-somethings enrolling in educational institutions like graduate school or community college due to lack of a job. A record share of 18- to 24-year-olds (39.6 percent) were enrolled in college in 2008, according to census data.

BlackBerrys in the Bed

As we’ve discussed on the blog before, the lines between work and personal lives are getting blurrier by the minute. And now, Millenials are being called the first “always-connected” generation in history. According to the report:

“Steeped in digital technology and social media, they treat their multi-tasking hand-held gadgets almost like a body part — for better and worse. More than eight-in-ten say they sleep with a cell phone glowing by the bed, poised to disgorge texts, phone calls, e-mails, songs, news, videos, games and wake-up jingles,” the report says.

Social Media? Yes Please!

A whopping 75 percent of 18- to 29-year-old respondents said they have a social networking profile. And although this generation is characterized as wary of human nature and many have their profile on lockdown, there are still great ways to c0nnect on public pages and forums.

If you’re an employer and you’re not involved in social networks, you’re missing an opportunity to get in front of a huge group of potential candidates.

Education

When ranked with older generations at comparable ages, Millenials are shown to be more highly educated (in the formal sense).

  • More than half of Millenials (54 percent) have at least some college education, compared with 49 percent of Gen X, 36 percent of baby boomers, and 24 percent of the Silent Generation
  • Millenials, when compared with previous generations at the same age, are also more likely to have finished high school
  • Conversely,  Millenials are less likely to be employed than their elder generations; 63 percent of Millenials are likely to be employed, compared to 70 percent of Gen Xers or 66 of baby boomers had been at the same age
  • Compared with the Silent Generation at the same age, Millenials are overall are more likely to be in the labor force

We’re Different

Like many of us (see what I did there?), sixty-seven percent of Millenials also see their age group as unique, according to the report. When asked why, the most popular response at 24 percent was “technology use.” Other responses included music, pop culture, and tolerance. And 6 percent say it’s because they’re smarter.

There’s much more to the report — you can read it in its entirety here.

Employers, what do you think, based on what you’ve experienced with Millenials in the workplace? And Millenials, do you agree with the report’s findings?

Six in Ten Workers Laid Off in Last Year Have Found New Jobs, According to CareerBuilder Survey

February 3rd, 2010 Comments off

Resilience is not only found among the Oceanic 815 survivors of “LOST” — who returned to TV last night after five seasons of battling hostile island dwellers, a mysterious smoke monster, and the bounds of space and time  — but in taking a look at CareerBuilder’s updated survey among more than U.S. workers, it’s also evident among many workers who have been laid off in the last 12 months.

Although Bureau of Labor Statistics job loss numbers could be in the negative range for January, unemployed Americans continue to be steadfast in their job searches, and, according to CareerBuilder survey results, many workers laid off in the last 12 months have found new employment.


The Results

1. New Employment

Your company may even be among those who have brought on laid off workers this past year, as over half (58 percent) of those laid off in the last twelve months have found new jobs. Fifty-one percent have found full-time positions (up from 48 percent in June 2009) and 7 percent have found part-time positions (up from 3 percent in June 2009).

“Despite one of the most competitive job markets in decades, nine-in-ten workers say they have not given up on their job searches, and the amount of workers who have found work is evidence that their drive and determination are paying off,” said Brent Rasmussen, President of CareerBuilder North America.  “The number of laid-off workers who have found new full-time and part-time jobs rose in the last six months.  Although this good news reflects a healing economy, it also shows that job seekers are exploring career options in new industries and locations.”

2. Higher Salaries
Of those workers who were laid off in the last 12 months and found new jobs, 61 percent reported they were able to negotiate comparable or higher pay for their new positions. Thirty-nine percent of workers took a pay cut.

3. Greener Grass
More than half (51 percent) of laid off workers who landed new jobs said they found work in a different field than where they were previously employed. One-third of workers said they really enjoy their new positions.

4. Movin’ Out
It appears from survey results that fewer unemployed workers would consider relocating for a job opportunity; on the other hand, the number of workers who actually took an out-of-area opportunity when it arose increased in comparison to June 2009 results.

  • Twenty-six percent of workers who were laid off in the last twelve months and found jobs relocated to a new city or state, up from 20 percent in June 2009.
  • Of those who are still looking for employment, 37 percent reported they would consider relocating for a job opportunity, down from 44 percent in June.

5. Entrepreneurship
Consistent with June 2009 survey results, many job seekers, unable to find jobs,  are considering creating their own job.  Twenty-nine percent of workers who have not found jobs are considering starting their own business.

6. Expanding the Search
How did workers who were laid off in the last 12 months have since gained employment find their jobs?

  • Personal referrals (22%)
  • Online job boards (21%)
  • Newspapers and other print classifieds (11%)
  • Recruiting/staffing firms (8%)
  • Career fairs (5%)
  • Social media sites such as Facebook, MySpace, and LinkedIn (4%)

You can read the full press release here.

Productivity, Compensation, and Retention Top the List of Employers’ Staffing Challenges, Says New CareerBuilder Survey

February 1st, 2010 Comments off

Amid news of strides toward economic recovery and growth in 2010, organizations are still facing a myriad of staffing challenges this year, according to a new CareerBuilder survey conducted in November 2009 among more than 2,700 employers. Employers listed a number of factors with which they are struggling — covering everything from handling worker burnout to strengthening their employment brand. In looking at employers’ responses, it’s also evident that many of these challenges are interconnected.

What are survey respondents’ top five staffing concerns?

1. Providing competitive compensation (34 percent)
2. Maintaining productivity levels (33 percent)
3. Retaining top talent (31 percent)
4. Worker burnout (30 percent)
5. Providing employees opportunities for upward mobility (25 percent)

Ten percent of employers also expressed concern about the difficulty of strengthening their company’s employment brand after layoffs or cutbacks.

Despite these challenges, it appears that many employers are determined to find ways to keep talented employees on their payroll. Among them:

  • Offering more flexible work arrangements (28 percent)
  • Investing more into training (21 percent)
  • Promising future benefits like raises or promotions when the economy picks up (18 percent)
  • Offering more performance-based incentives like trips and bonuses (16 percent)
  • Providing higher salary without the title (11 percent)
  • Providing both higher title and salary (10 percent)
  • Providing higher title without the salary (7 percent)

Only 6 percent of employers responded by saying they haven’t been able to hold on to top talent.

“Retention is just one area that companies will need to address to maintain and grow their businesses this year,” said Jason Ferrara, vice president of corporate marketing for CareerBuilder. “Having the right people on board is a top concern. Our survey found that forty percent of companies are concerned about top workers leaving their organization in 2010 and that nearly one in five think morale at their company is poor. At the same time, companies have their eyes on future hiring challenges, especially as the economy moves into recovery.”

What do you anticipate as your biggest recruitment challenge this year?

More Than One In Five Health Care Employers Plan to Hire in 2010, Reveals Annual CareerBuilder Forecast

January 28th, 2010 Comments off

Although the recession has been hard on many industries, the health care industry is one that has managed to thrive. Since the recession’s start, the health care industry has added 631,000 jobs, according to the Bureau of Labor Statistics, and has consistently added headcount each month. CareerBuilder’s annual health care hiring forecast indicates that this hiring momentum will likely continue into 2010. The survey was conducted between November 5 and November 23, 2009, among more than 240 health care employers.

Hiring in 2010

  • More than one in five (22 percent) health employers said they plan to increase the number of full-time, permanent employees this year, up from 17 percent last year.
  • Ten percent of employers said they had plans to increase the number of part-time employees at their organizations in 2010, in order to help meet demand.

“While most industries struggled with headcount since the start of the recession, health care was and continues to be one of the strongest industries for hiring,” said Jason Ferrara, vice president of corporate marketing for CareerBuilder.

“Forty percent of health care employers, by far the highest among industries we surveyed, have open positions for which they can’t find qualified candidates. This shows that there is high demand for qualified health care workers across a variety of areas; everything from medical assistants to records specialists to nurses.”

Five Health Care Recruitment Trends for 2010

1. Replacing Low-Performing Employees

Health care employers are taking advantage of the current labor pool’s large number of highly qualified candidates to strengthen their work force. Forty-three percent of health care employers say they plan to replace low-performing employees with higher performers in 2010.

What do health care employers really think of their employees’ performance? When asked to grade their current work force, 18 percent rated their employees an “A”, 68 percent a “B”, 13 percent a “C”, and less than one percent a “D” or “F. Whew.

2. More Flexibility

Flexible work options continue to be important to health care employers. Over a third (37 percent) of health care employers said they will provide more flexible work arrangements for employees in 2010, including:

  • Alternative schedules (74%) — Employees can come into work early and leave early, or come in later and leave later
  • Compressed work weeks (53%) Employees work the same hours, but consolidate work into fewer days
  • Telecommuting (40%) — Employees work from home or from another remote location
  • Job sharing (12%) — Employees share the same position in a company, each working part of the week
  • Summer hours (12%) — Workers enjoy condensed hours during the summer; typically 1/2 days on Fridays

3. Recruitment Tools

As the demand for quality health care employees continues this year, health care employers will leverage a variety of recruitment tools to fill their open positions. But on what are they planning to spend more money, exactly?

  • Online recruitment sites — (25%)
  • Newspaper classifieds — (20%)
  • Career fairs — (18%)
  • Social and professional networking sites — (13%)
  • Staffing firms and recruiters — (7%)

4. Freelance Workers

Because of the great demand for qualified workers, many health care employers are seeking out freelance or contract health care workers to supplement their needs.  In fact, 34 percent of health care employers are hiring contract or freelance workers in 2010.

5. Green Jobs

“Green jobs” are defined as jobs that contribute significantly to preserving or restoring environmental quality. Being “green” is a rapidly growing movement within the health care industry as companies seek ways to run more efficiently; 10 percent of health care employers plan to add “green” jobs in 2010.
If you missed it, read the full press release here.

Small Businesses Report on Access to Credit, Other 2010 Challenges In New CareerBuilder Survey

January 13th, 2010 Comments off

Although there are signs that the economy is beginning to heal, small businesses are still feeling aches and pains caused by the recession. About a third (34 percent) of small businesses — organizations with 500 employees or fewer — are unsure if they will have access to necessary credit in 2010, according to a new CareerBuilder survey conducted between Nov. 5 and Nov. 23, 2009, among more than 1,450 small businesses. In addition, 15 percent of small businesses said that an inability to access credit this year will prevent them from adding headcount.

A Look Back at 2009

Credit was more difficult to obtain in 2009, and small businesses tried, yet were at times unable, to meet the challenge. Seventeen percent of small businesses reported they were unable to access the credit needed to support their businesses in 2009, and of those companies, 26 percent were unable to add employees. On a positive note, however, of those companies who were able to access credit last year, 73 percent were able to hire new employees.

“While small businesses were hit hard during this recession, they will play a vital role as the economy bounces back,” said Brent Rasmussen, President of CareerBuilder North America. “After past recessions, small businesses re-energized the economy by driving innovation and putting people back to work. The majority of small businesses we talked to say they are confident they will not lose their businesses in 2010, and many are hopeful that they will be able to add staff to support their bottom lines and remain competitive.”

Looking Ahead -- Cautiously

While small businesses are cautiously optimistic as they begin this new year, they are still preparing to face some hurdles. When asked what their organization’s top challenges would be for 2010, small businesses reported the following:

  • Cost of health insurance — 42 percent
  • Marketing expenses and costs to build awareness — 26 percent
  • Attracting and hiring top talent — 22 percent
  • Government regulations — 21 percent

What do you predict your business’s biggest challenges will be for 2010, and what is your strategy for attack?

The Annual Review: 2009’s Top 10 Workplace Trends

December 21st, 2009 Comments off

Countdown_1The year is almost over, which of course means it’s time for a completely unprecedented, unexpected-in-every-way “top 10 of 2009” list…

Here, I give you my list of the 10 biggest trends we saw this year in the world of workforce management.  (Notice anything I missed? Let me know in the comments section below!)

 

  1. Social Media Specialists made their way to corporate America. Recognizing the value in using social media as both a branding and recruiting tool, companies like Comcast, General Motors and JetBlue Airways,  began hiring professionals specifically for the sake of managing and monitoring their social media sites.  (Even Britney Spears got in on the action.) 
  2. Internships made a comeback…in various forms. In the tightened economy, internship positions became more competitive among job seekers– as well as an attractive alternative for employers looking for cheap labor and a way to “test” new employees before hiring them full-time. One position that stood out was Pizza Hut’s “Twintern,” an intern responsible for posting updates on – and monitoring – the company’s Twitter account. The experiment turned out to be a success on both ends – come fall, Pizza Hut offered the twintern a full-time position. Similarly, 2009 also saw the rise of virtual internships made possible through improving technology and the growth of social media, and enabling employers to expand their pool of candidates while saving money on office overhead. 
  3. Older workers were forced to rethink retirement. Nearly 60 percent of workers aged 65 and older reported that they were postponing retirement due to financial strains, according to a March 2009 CareerBuilder survey. While employers may be worried over how they will manage this aging workforce, multigenerational workforces are actually an asset to employers; they simply need to be “proactive in devising new strategies to harness and harmonize the multigenerational workforce,” advises BusinessWeek’s Roselyn Feinsod.
  4.  “Qwittered” entered the American lexicon…joining the prestigious ranks “Facebook fired.” Stories abounded this year of employees getting reprimanded for posting inappropriate comments or – as we saw in this year’s most infamous case - videos on online social media sites. Even celebrities were not immune to this trend, as ESPN’s Sports Guy recently found out.  What can we learn from these stories? For one thing, having a well-thought out and clearly stated social media policy in place can eliminate these sorts of incidents. Make sure employees are aware of the policy and that what they say can be grounds for punishment. (For tips on creating a social media policy, check out Sharlyn Lauby’s excellent post on 10 Must-Haves for Your Social Media Policy)
  5. Medical cost-cutting efforts got more creative. As health care costs soared, businesses began looking for ways to reduce medical coverage expenses with a new sense of urgency. Whole Foods, for instance, began offering workers incentives for losing weight and improving their overall health to ultimately reduce medical coverage costs; while other employers started expanding their employee assistance program offerings to include counseling – a less expensive alternative to therapy obtained through company medical coverage… Then of course there were those companies making the case for legalizing medical marijuana, saying the move could save them money on drug costs.
  6. Thursday became the new Friday. Taking a cue from Utah’s institution of a four-day workweek for state workers, employers nationwide began to follow suit – hoping to generate the same benefits Utah saw as a result of its experiment.  Not only did the state successfully reduce energy and help workers save money on commuting costs, as it had hoped, but workers took fewer sick days and state services improved, as well. 
  7. Women made workplace history. As layoffs hit men at a disproportionate rate, the ratio of women to men in the workforce evened out. As of September, women held half of the nation’s jobs – for the first time in our nation’s history.
  8. Sex at the office became a hot(ter?) topic: While sex in the workplace is nothing new, the debate – both in the media and at the water cooler – over if and when it’s ever okay reignited after David Letterman admitted to having an affair with a “Late Night” staffer – and gained even more steam when two other, high profile sex-in-the-workplace stories surfaced soon after. (Regardless of where you stand on the issue, it’s always good to have a refresher on the rules regarding sex in the workplace.) 
  9. Year-end bonuses, gifts and holiday parties disappeared. No surprises here: Fewer businesses planned office parties this year – whether due to budget concerns, or out of mindfulness of the hardships clients and employees’ families are experiencing. In the spirit of the season, however, some employers are organizing company-wide charitable events as an alternative. As is the case with holiday parties, the economy is also preventing many businesses from offering the typical year-end gifts or grant bonuses…but that doesn’t mean they’re not trying to appease their employees and clients with alternative gifts, such as car washes, choice parking spots and complimentary breakfasts.  
  10. Office personal space became scarcer. In efforts to trim costs and boost productivity, many employers nationwide began reducing per-employee office space – from removing cubicle walls to create open floor plans, to eliminating assigned workspaces for employees who spend a lot of time away from their desks. Despite employers’ good intentions, however, some employees are finding that the closer quarters disrupt their work flow and increase tensions, according to the Wall Street Journal. (The lesson? Know your audience: While some people may thrive in tighter quarters, it can be distracting to others. Help your employees by giving them the option to work remotely or make sure you arrange the office in a way that maximizes the available space.)

What trends did you notice popping up this year? (And what do you anticipate we’ll see more or less of in 2010?)

What Do Candidates Really Want This Holiday Season — and Are They Getting It?

December 10th, 2009 Comments off

coloreddotsWhile it’s true that many companies have been forced to make difficult business decisions this year, many employers still plan to reward their employees for hard work with holiday perks like bonuses, gifts and parties — even if these perks are scaled back a bit. These results are from CareerBuilder’s recent survey about workplace holiday giving among more than 3,000 hiring managers and HR professionals. We’ve got the lowdown on what businesses are doing about bonuses, gifts, and the oft-infamous work holiday party.

Bonuses:

  • Nearly three in ten (29 percent) employers plan to give their employees holiday bonuses this year.  Among that group, 16 percent are planning to give the same amount as in previous years, while 11 percent plan to give less.
  • Twelve percent of employers say they will not be issuing holiday bonuses even though they have in previous years.

Gifts:

  • More than a quarter (26 percent) of employers plan to give holiday gifts, with 15 percent planning to spend the same amount for workers as in previous years.  Eight percent plan to spend less.
  • Another eight percent say they are not planning to give holidays gifts in 2009, even though they have in years past.

Parties:

  • Almost half (49 percent) of employers are planning a holiday party for their employees this year.  Of that group, 30 percent plan to throw the same party as in previous years, while 18 percent are planning something on a smaller scale.
  • Eleven percent of employers don’t plan to have a holiday party in 2009 even though they have in previous years.

“After a challenging year, some organizations are cutting back on the holiday perks that they may have offered in previous years,” said Rosemary Haefner, Vice President of Human Resources for CareerBuilder. “Even though holiday bonuses, gifts and parties may be trimmed back this season, employers are doing what they can to reward their workers and get their staffs in the holiday spirit.”

So with cutbacks more prevalent in the workplace,  how can you make your employees happy this holiday season? What do they really want?

Here are some alternative workplace gift-giving ideas:

  • The gift of financial preparedness. Help employees be realistic in their holiday budgeting this holiday season. Workers often need to budget more carefully around the holidays, so let your employees know upfront and early whether or not they can expect a bonus this season. This way, they will be able to gauge whether they’ll have that extra money for a plane ticket — or whether they’ll have to stock up on canned soups for dinner this season. Give your employees the gift of preparedness; their pocketbooks will thank you.
  • The gift of giving. Volunteering is a great workplace activity all year ’round, but if you’re looking for an alternative to the typical (and pricey) holiday bash, I can’t think of a better way than helping others in need by donating time to local charities.  Volunteering with your team or company still allows you to be out of the office in a social setting while fostering your holiday spirit, giving back to your local community, and making the holiday a bit nicer for someone else. Sites like VolunteerMatch let you search for volunteer opportunities in your local area. Read more tips about finding a charity here and here, find an extensive list of charities here, and check out the Better Business Bureau’s “Charities and Donors” section for more resources.
  • The gift of fun. Even if your company holiday party is canceled, you can still  celebrate the season with your employees with some warm drinks and hot food. Office potlucks are a great and budget-friendly way to have a low-key celebration in the office with your employees. Even better, as commuting after work hours can sometimes present obstacles for employees, you can host a potluck breakfast or lunch during the work day. As an alternative, screen a movie of your employees’ choosing, pop some popcorn and provide sodas, and have a low-key but entertaining in-office party.
  • The gift of appreciation. While material gifts are nice, sometimes nothing is better than getting a bit of recognition for work well done, whether it’s for a single project or an entire financial quarter’s worth of blood, sweat and tears. As we have learned, 79 of employees who quit their jobs cite a lack of appreciation as a key reason for leaving. Remember to say “thank you” to your employees this holiday season! Even small gestures, like a  card or letter with your sincere words of thanks can mean a lot to your employees. Spontaneity of gestures can also be a nice change in the work routine; grab your employees coffee and bagels unexpectedly one morning — or dream up your own creative way to say “thanks.”

  • The gift of friends and family. While employees may enjoy coming to work, they may in fact be longing to spend more time with loved ones outside the office, especially around the holidays. Yes, businesses are busier than ever, often juggling fewer people and more work — but your employees will enjoy and appreciate even a small break from the grind. Consider letting them leave a bit early one afternoon, or offer a flexible work option for a week or two, like coming in early/leaving early, or working four 10-hour days so they can take a long weekend. Different options will work for different types of businesses — but employees will savor the gift of more time with loved ones — and they’ll likely come back more refreshed, relaxed, and focused post-holiday.
  • The gift of choice. One final idea: Ask your employees what they want this holiday season! Let them know that budgets are tight, but that you want to celebrate with them and show them your gratitude for their work and dedication. Let them brainstorm ideas, and pick one or implement them all.

What are you giving your employees this holiday season?