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Clinton vs. Trump: Who’d Be a Better Boss?

November 3rd, 2016 Comments off
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You might have your mind made up on who you’d want leading the country. But working for him or her could be an entirely different story. Recently CareerBuilder asked employees across the U.S. one important question: “If you had to choose, which candidate would you like to be your boss?”

According to survey results, 57 percent of workers say they would prefer to work for the former Secretary of State, Hillary Clinton – while the remaining 43 percent say they would like businessman Donald Trump as a boss.

Hillary Clinton was firmly preferred by women in the survey with 62 percent saying they would prefer the former Senator as a boss. Men were tighter in their decision between candidates, with an even split between Clinton and Trump.

Broken down by race, 52 percent of workers that identify as Caucasian would like Donald Trump as their boss. On the other hand, Hillary Clinton was the preferred choice among African American (87 percent), Hispanic (79 percent) and Asian (78 percent) professionals.

What makes a good boss? “Managers who interact frequently and communicate directly are more likely to have the support of their employees. The ideal form of that communication will vary from individual to individual, but everyone’s jobs get done better when expectations and roles are clearly defined,” said Rosemary Haefner, vice president of human resources at CareerBuilder. “The best managers understand the triggers for their workers’ success and are able to course correct when productivity drops or conflict arises.”

Should you talk politics at work? While you can’t prevent an employee from expressing his or her beliefs, you can focus on the fact that your workplace may not be the appropriate forum for such conversations. Political chatter that gets too heated can hurt both the employee and the company, so having a policy on these discussions, or a broad anti-harassment policy, is encouraged. There are many ways to approach that policy. Some companies explicitly discourage discussions of flammable political topics such as abortion, others are vaguer because of the risks of free speech in the office. What’s written in the policy is dependent on your culture; what’s important is that it’s communicated to employees.

Also remember that subordinates often look up to managers, so modeling the right behavior is imperative when in a leadership role. As a manager your job is also to be a mentor. Employees should be learning from you. If employees see their managers water cooler chats getting heated, they’ll likely think that behavior is OK.

An important note on this topic is that while speaking about politics with your peers and colleagues may be alright in a more relaxed workplace, if you’re a manager, you should refrain from speaking about politics with subordinates — doing so can put your employees in an uncomfortable position. And, on the other hand, engaging your boss in a political debate could open you up to potential retaliation in the future.

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